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AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Review: The Best APU Not on the Market

AMD Ryzen 3000 CPU
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If it were available on store shelves, AMD's as-yet unreleased-to-retail Ryzen 3 5300G would be the best value APU on the market. In fact, with four Zen 3 CPU cores and eight threads paired with the surprisingly still-powerful Vega 6 graphics engine, this chip could revitalize the value chip segment if priced in the $130 to $150 range. However, for now, this Cezzane chip and its surprisingly potent integrated graphics remain confined to often-crippled OEM systems — AMD hasn't brought it to retail yet. But as we've seen with the 5300Gs' more powerful counterparts, AMD could choose to open these up to DIYers, upsetting our CPU Benchmark Hierarchy and setting up a pitched battle for supremacy on both our Best CPUs and Best Cheap CPUs rankings.

AMD's first salvo of 7nm 'Cezanne' APUs for desktop PCs proved to be exceptionally attractive during these soul-crushing times of the GPU shortage. Those chips come bristling with the most potent integrated graphics you can get in an x86 desktop chip, and remarkably, they've remained in stock at suggested pricing since launch — a rarity in this silicon-starved world. Provided that you align your expectations accordingly, both the $359 Ryzen 7 5700G and $259 Ryzen 5 5600G serve up impressive iGPU gaming performance, showing that the Zen 3 architecture paired with Vega graphics can still outclass the best integrated graphics that Intel has to offer.

AMD's Ryzen 5000G chips mark a huge step forward, but the company's decision to keep the Ryzen 3 5300G off of store shelves is disappointing. That's probably because the chip is too good for its own good, though.

Assuming that AMD would price the 5300G at $150, it would retail for 60% less than $359 5700G and 40% less than the $259 5600G. However, according to our testing, the Ryzen 3 5300G delivers 86% of the gaming performance of the 5700G and 90% of the 5600G at 1280x720. That's a great value if we focus specifically on integrated graphics performance, which is really the only reason to consider buying this chip. However, it's clear that this could siphon away AMD's sales of pricier alternatives. 

AMD Ryzen 5000 G-Series 65W Cezanne APUs
CPU
Arch.PriceCores/ ThreadsBase/ Boost Freq.GPU CoresGPU Freq. (MHz)TDPL3 (MB)
Ryzen 7 5700GZen 3$3598 / 163.8 / 4.6RX Vega 8200065W16
Ryzen 5 5600GZen 3$2596 / 123.9 / 4.4RX Vega 7190065W16
Ryzen 3 5300GZen 3N/A (possibly ~$150)4 / 84.0 / 4.2RX Vega 6170065W8

That wouldn't make good business sense for AMD because it certainly doesn't have any issues selling its Ryzen chips at a premium. Besides, before the Ryzen 5000G chips came to market, AMD had already put its APU lineup on the backburner for a few years — the Cezanne chips arrived three chip generations (Zen 2, XT, Zen 3) after AMD launched its last round of 12nm quad-core Zen+ APUs for the DIY market in 2019 — so in many ways, this is more of the same.

AMD still hasn't brought any Zen 3-powered Ryzen 3 chip to retail yet, or the three 35W GE-Series APUs that would also be great lower-priced chips.

AMD has used the 5000G series to plug pricing gaps in its Ryzen 5000 lineup, the company insists they serve as replacements for the traditional non-X equivalents (we disagree), and the Ryzen 5 5600G lowered the steep $299 price of entry to Ryzen 5000 down to $259.

That's still plenty expensive for the cheapest Zen 3 chip, so a $150 Ryzen 3 5300G, conceivably with a bundled cooler, would be a boon for enthusiasts, especially for extreme budget gaming rigs while we wait out the GPU shortage, or small form factor and HTPC rigs.

Our list of Best Cheap CPUs could certainly use an update, too: There simply hasn't been any significant releases of cheaper CPUs in the recent past, and most of our top picks sell well above standard pricing or simply aren't available. Given that cryptocurrency mining has risen in popularity again, we don't expect GPU pricing to normalize any time soon, either. All of which would make the Ryzen 3 5300G an almost perfect solution for value seekers, especially given its great performance in our integrated graphics test suite. 

AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Specifications and Pricing

The Ryzen 5000G 'Cezanne' family spans from four to eight cores and has the Zen 3 architecture that provides a 19% IPC uplift over the Zen 2 architecture used in the previous-gen Ryzen 4000G models (those chips never came to retail, though). We've covered Cezanne's architectural details here

AMD Ryzen 5000 G-Series 65W Cezanne APUs
CPU
Arch.PriceCores/ ThreadsBase/ Boost Freq.TDPL3 (MB)GPU CoresGPU Freq. (MHz)
Ryzen 7 5800XZen 3$4498 / 163.8 / 4.7 GHz105W32 (1x32)N/AN/A
Core i7-11700K (KF)Rocket Lake$374 - $3498 / 163.6 / 5.0125W16UHD Graphics 750 Xe 32EU1300
Ryzen 7 5700GZen 3$3598 / 163.8 / 4.665W16RX Vega 82000
Ryzen 7 4750GZen 2~$3108 / 163.6 / 4.465W8RX Vega 82100
Ryzen 5 5600XZen 3$2996 / 123.7 / 4.6 GHz65W32 (1x32)N/AN/A
Core i5-11600K (KF)Rocket Lake$262 (K) - $237(KF)6 / 123.9 / 4.9125W12UHD Graphics 750 Xe 32EU1300
Ryzen 5 5600GZen 3$2596 / 123.9 / 4.465W16RX Vega 71900
Ryzen 5 3600Zen 2$2006 / 123.6 / 4.265W32N/AN/a
Core i5-11400 (F)Rocket Lake$182 - $1576 / 122.6 / 4.265W12UHD Graphics 750 Xe 24EU1300
Ryzen 3 5300GZen 3N/A4 / 84.0 / 4.265W8RX Vega 61700
Ryzen 5 3400GZen+$1494 / 83.7 / 4.265W4RX Vega 111400
Ryzen 3 3200GZen+$994 / 43.6 / 4.065W4RX Vega 81250

If we go strictly by product naming, the Ryzen 3 5300G replaces the aged $99 Ryzen 3 3200G. However, its four cores are threaded, whereas the 3200G only had four threads, so the 5300G feels more like the old Ryzen 5 3400G that came with the same number of CPU cores. 

The Ryzen 3 5300G comes with four CPU cores and eight threads running at a 4.0 GHz base and 4.2 GHz boost clock. It also comes with 8MB of L3 cache, but it's more generously-equipped Ryzen 5000G counterparts come with 16MB. As you'll soon see, that has a big impact on gaming performance when you pair the 5300G with a discrete GPU, so it doesn't really slot into the role of a stop-gap replacement that you would continue to use if you plan to buy a discrete GPU in the future when pricing returns to some form of normal. 

The $259 Ryzen 5 5600G plugged the $100 gap between the $299 Ryzen 5 5600X and AMD's entire sub-$299 product stack. For now, the previous-gen $200 Ryzen 5 3600 represents the next step down AMD's product stack. Given the performance we've seen from the Ryzen 3 5300G, we think that AMD would price the chip from $130 to $150, with the latter being more likely due to Intel's lack of a competing chip with robust integrated graphics in this segment.

Speaking of Intel, it doesn't have any Rocket Lake Core i3 processors. Instead, it relies on the refreshed 10th-Gen Comet Lake models to firm up its low end lineup. As a result, Intel's 10th-Gen Core i3-10325 would be the only competing chip, but it still comes with the entirely inadequate UHD Graphics 630 engine that doesn't put the chip in the same class as the Ryzen 3 5300G. 

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AMD chose to reuse the 7nm Vega graphics engine instead of incorporating newer RDNA variants. The Ryzen 3 5300G comes with the Vega 6 graphics engine with six CUs running at 1.7 GHz. That's one fewer CU and a 200 MHz reduction from the Ryzen 5 5600G, which results in a larger iGPU performance delta between the two chips that we've measured with the other Ryzen 5000G models. The chip has a configurable TDP (cTDP) that stretches from 45W to 65W, though most desktop PCs will operate at the latter threshold.  

As with all Zen 3 processors, the Ryzen 5000G chips step up from DDR4-2933 to the DDR4-3200 interface, which will help boost gaming performance with the integrated GPU. Surprisingly, the majority of the Ryzen 5000G 'Cezanne' SoC comes from the Ryzen 4000 'Renoir' SoC. To improve time to market, AMD essentially swapped in new Zen 3 cores, leaving the I/O, 7nm Radeon RX Vega integrated graphics engine, and SoC design intact. As such, the 5600G has 24 lanes of PCIe 3.0 connectivity compared to 24 lanes of PCIe 4.0 found on the Ryzen 5000 models for the desktop PC. 

The Cezanne desktop chips drop into 500-series and some 400-series motherboards, though support on the latter will vary by vendor. 

AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Test Setup and Overclocking

Overclocking the Ryzen 3 5300G was similar to the other Ryzen 5000G chips we've tested — we even matched the 5600G's iGPU overclock. The integrated RX Vega graphics engine is an easy overclocker, jumping up to 2.3 GHz (a 500 MHz improvement over stock settings) with the SoC dialed in at 1.35V (this power domain feeds both the iGPU and SoC). Higher settings introduced artifacting, though, and we didn't attempt to add too much additional voltage to the graphics due to our memory and core overclocks. Notably, this is only 100 MHz less iGPU frequency than we achieved with the 5700G.  

APUs are one of the trickiest types of chips to overclock, at least when it comes to balancing the different units. Because gaming performance scales far better with iGPU and memory throughput than core clocks, we toggled AMD's auto-overclocking Precision Boost Overdrive (PBO) for the CPU cores. PBO reduced the difficulties balancing the CPU, iGPU, and memory clocks, but further tuning might have yielded a better all-core overclock. Of course, the silicon lottery always comes into play, so your mileage might vary. 

Good Cezanne chips support a fabric clock (FCLK) up to 2400 MHz, but it's a balancing act. We settled for a 2000 MHz FCLK and dialed in an easy DDR4-4000 with a 1:1 FCLK/memory ratio. That's pretty impressive for a Ryzen 3 model. This 'coupled mode' is the sweet spot for memory latency on AMD's Zen 2 and 3 platforms, but dialing in a higher FCLK can unlock higher coupled frequencies. A DDR4-4000 kit is extremely pricey for a Ryzen 3 APU build, so we stopped there. You should shoot for a DDR4-3200 kit with this type of chip, provided you can nab one at a reasonable price. 

AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Gaming Benchmarks 

AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Integrated GPU Gaming Performance — The TLDR 

Below you can see the geometric mean of our integrated graphics gaming tests across five titles at 1280x720 and 1080p, with each resolution split into its own chart to give us a decent overall view of the current landscape. These are cumulative metrics, so individual wins vary on a per-title basis. You'll find the game-by-game test results further below.

The Ryzen 3 5300G is currently only available in pre-built OEM systems, and those systems are often only available with a single stick of memory. We included a test setup with a single channel of memory as a reminder to check the memory configuration on pre-builts, as that is how many OEMs ship their systems. That's particularly painful for APUs. You can read more about that in our Ryzen 7 5700G review. 

Here are the test configurations for the entries in the charts below:

  • Ryzen 3 5300G: 2x 8GB DDR4-3200 (dual channel) memory @ 16-16-16-36, ASUS ROG Strix B550-E, PBO disabled, Default power limits
  • Ryzen 3 5300G PBO + DDR4-4000: 2x 8GB DDR4-3200 (dual channel) memory @ DDR4-4000 19-19-19-48, ASUS ROG Strix B550-E, PBO enabled, FCLK at 2000 MHz (1:1 coupled mode), RX Vega at 2300 MHz
  • Ryzen 5 5600G: 2x 8GB DDR4-3200 (dual channel) memory @ 16-16-16-36, ASUS ROG Strix B550-E, PBO disabled, Default power limits
  • Ryzen 7 5700G: 2x 8GB DDR4-3200 (dual channel) memory @ 16-16-16-36, ASUS ROG Strix B550-E, PBO disabled, Default power limits
  • Ryzen 7 5700G HP Single Channel: 1x 16GB DDR4-3200 (single channel) memory @ 22-22-22-52, HP Pavilion TP01-2066, No configurable options
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iGPU Performance relative to Ryzen 7 5700G
1280x7201920x1080
Ryzen 7 5700G100%100%
Ryzen 5 5600G96.3%96%
Ryzen 7 4750G92.9%94.1%
Ryzen 3 5300G85.8%87.2%
Ryzen 5 3400G83.5%84.1%
Ryzen 3 3200G77.1%78.1%
Intel UHD Graphics 750 32 EU (11600K, 11700K)58.3%~48.9%
Intel UHD Graphics 730 24 EU (i5-11400)51.7%42.9%
Intel UHD Graphics 630 24 EU (10600K)36.0%34.4%

The table above gives us a performance comparison of the most relevant chips, with the Ryzen 7 5700G used as the baseline. The quad-core eight-thread Ryzen 3 5300G beats its predecessor, the Ryzen 3 3200G, by ~11% at both resolutions and edges past the Ryzen 5 3400G, too.

At 1280x720, the Ryzen 3 5300G delivers 86% of the gaming performance of the $359 Ryzen 7 5700G, but for 60% less cash (based on our worst-case theoretical $150 pricing). The same story plays out with the $259 Ryzen 5 5600G: The Ryzen 3 5300G provides 90% of the 5600G's performance, but for 40% less cash. 

AMD's Ryzen 7 Pro 4750G represents AMD's most modern previous-gen APU, but it never came to retail. This chip is 8% faster at 1280x720 but comes with a much higher price tag befit of its beefier complement of cores, cache, and higher clock speeds.

Flipping over to the 1920x1080 results finds the Ryzen 3 5300G landing at an average of ~31 fps across our test suite. It's important to bear in mind that we test most of these game titles at or near the lowest standard presets, but dedicated tuners can run just about any game on lower-end hardware. Regardless, we're clearly far enough down on the FHD performance scale that the GPU will struggle with many triple-A titles if you use the standard presets. Of course, perceptions of what constitutes a playable frame rate can vary (it really is a subjective matter), but you'll need to keep your FHD gaming expectations in check. It's definitely possible with many titles, but you'll have to compromise heavily on fidelity. 

The Intel chips give us about what we expect. which is lackluster performance. Intel's UHD Graphics 750 engine with the Xe architecture is a decent improvement over the company's UHD Graphics 630 engine, but Intel ported the Xe architecture back to the 14nm process, resulting in fewer graphics cores. As such, the highest-end desktop chips currently have 32 EUs, whereas the 10nm Tiger Lake chips stretch up to 96 EU. Intel has made strides compared to the UHD Graphics 630 engine in the 10600K, but the best Intel chips still trail AMD's three-year-old Ryzen 5 3400G 'Picasso' chips by significant margins. As a result, it's a no-contest against AMD's more potent 5000G chips in every facet.

It's clear that the Ryzen 3 5300G represents an impressive step forward over the last generation of APUs that came to retail. Overall, the results are simple: If you're looking for the best integrated graphics on the desktop, Cezanne is the leader for desktop PCs. A single Ryzen 3 5300G even ties or exceeds much more expensive Intel + GT 1030 combos in our integrated graphics test suite. That's impressive.

The Ryzen 3 5300G provides quite a bit of performance, but it's hard to ascertain its value relative to the Ryzen 5 and 7 models because AMD hasn't assigned pricing. The 5300G provides surprisingly good performance at 1280x720, but the fidelity tradeoffs become more severe at 1080p, severely limiting the number of titles you could play comfortably. 

Far Cry 5 on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Far Cry 5 is the one title where the Ryzen 3 5300G trails the Ryzen 5 3400G. The 5300G trails the 3400G by ~3% at 1280x720 and 8% at 1080p.

However, the Ryzen 3 5300G is 8.5% faster than the previous-gen Ryzen 3 3200G at 1280x720, and 15.8% at 1080p. 

Playing Far Cry 5 with the 5300G at 1080p did get a bit dicey, but further fine-tuning and/or overclocking pays dividends. As you can see, the Ryzen 3 5300G is exceedingly impressive after overclocking, beating both the stock Ryzen 7 5700G and Ryzen 5 5600G. 

It's also pretty impressive to see the Ryzen 3 5300G take such a solid lead over the Intel + GT 1030 pairings that, even under the best of pricing circumstances, cost much more than this single chip. That's a lot of performance packed into one 65W chip. 

Grand Theft Auto V on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Grand Theft Auto V is immortal, partly because you can play it on lower-powered hardware if you're willing to trade off fidelity for performance.

The Ryzen 3 5300G pushes out an impressive 124.2 and 79.8 fps at 1280x720 and 1080p, respectively, leaving plenty of room for increasing the quality settings. Again, we see big results from iGPU and memory tweaking as the overclocked Ryzen 3 5300G takes the lead over the other stock Cezanne chips. 

As expected, the Ryzen 3 5300G takes the lead over its previous-gen Zen+ comparables, the Ryzen 5 3400G and Ryzen 3 3200G. 

You'll notice that the Intel + GT 1030 configurations pull ahead in this benchmark. GTAV has historically favored Intel CPU architectures, and we theorize that memory throughput may play a role here, too. The Intel chips may pull out the performance lead here, but again, these combos are far more expensive than the Ryzen 3 5300G. 

Shadow of the Tomb Raider on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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If you haven't been paying attention, the Intel chips have suffered throughout the iGPU benchmarks, delivering woefully inadequate performance in every title. That continues in Shadow of the Tomb Raider. The Core i7-11700K and i5-11600K offer nearly identical performance in the 1080p benchmark, showing we've reached a graphics bottleneck that the 11700K's slightly higher CPU clock rate can't improve. The Core i5-11400, with its pared-back engine with 24 EUs, suffers even more. 

Also, pay attention to the Ryzen 7 5700G configuration with a single memory channel. Because most OEMs ship APU-powered pre-builts without the option to buy two memory sticks, this is the best-case Cezanne performance that money can buy with many OEM systems. As you can see, crippling the highest-end Cezanne chip with a single memory stick means it can't keep up with a properly-configured lowest-end model, the Ryzen 3 5300G.

The Ryzen 3 5300G is ~4% faster than the Ryzen 5 3400G at 1280x720 and 1% faster (consider this a tie) at 1080p. The Ryzen 7 4750G is faster than the Ryzen 3 5300G in all of the benchmarks, but that's expected and inconsequential. The 4750G is much more expensive and has always been OEM-only, so if you don't plan on buying a pre-built system, you'll have to pay scalper pricing. As shown in our Ryzen 7 4750G review, that kills the 4750G's value proposition. 

Strange Brigade on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Our last foray into testing the Xe architecture in Strange Brigade happened at the Rocket Lake launch, and try as we might, we couldn't get the cursor to appear on the screen. However, newer drivers (or perhaps a game update?) have fixed that issue.

Strange Brigade now works just fine on our test system, but that doesn't help the UHD Graphics engines much. Much like we've seen throughout the entire test suite, the Ryzen 3 5300G beats the fastest Intel iGPU by ~45 to 50% in this benchmark.

AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Discrete GPU Gaming Performance — The TLDR 

Below you can see the geometric mean of our gaming tests with a discrete GPU at 1080p and 1440p, with each resolution split into its own chart to give us a decent overall view of the current landscape. As usual, we're testing with an Nvidia GeForce RTX 3090 to reduce GPU-imposed bottlenecks as much as possible, and differences between test subjects will shrink with lesser cards or higher resolutions. These are cumulative metrics, so individual wins vary on a per-title basis. You'll find the game-by-game test results further below. Some of these same benchmarks appeared in our integrated GPU testing above, but we used higher quality settings for the tests below. 

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Discrete GPU Performance Relative to Ryzen 7 5800X - All chips at stock settings.
1920x10802560x1440
Ryzen 7 5800X / 5600X100%100%
Core i7-11700K95.2%98%
Core i5-11600K92.8%96.7%
Core i5-1140089.2%93.5%
Ryzen 7 5700G80.7%86.3%
Ryzen 5 5600G79.5%81.7%
Ryzen 3 3300X74.7%79.7%
Ryzen 7 4750G64.5%71.2%
Ryzen 3 5300G61.5%66.7%
Ryzen 5 3400G51.8%57.5%
Ryzen 3 3200G47%52.9%

Here we can see how the chips stack up using the Ryzen 7 5800X and Ryzen 5 5600X as the baseline (they're nearly identical in gaming with a discrete GPU), but keep in mind that we're running these tests mostly for academic purposes — the Ryzen 3 5300G isn't really intended to be paired with a discrete GPU.

The Ryzen 5 5600G trails the Ryzen 5 5700G by a negligible amount (~2%), showing that the two chips are very evenly matched. We see a much more pronounced difference between the Ryzen 3 5300G and the Ryzen 5 5600G, with the 5300G trailing by 30% at stock settings. We can chalk most of this disparity up to the 3200G's halved L3 cache. The Ryzen 3 5300G responds readily to overclocking, but the 5600G is still 15% faster. 

The 5300G trails the quad-core $120 Ryzen 3 3300X by 21%, which is surprising. The 3300X comes with four cores and eight threads just like the 5300G, but it also comes with the older Zen 2 architecture. As a result, the 5300G is faster than the 3300X in our application testing below. The 5300G's lead applies to both single- and multi-threaded workloads, but the 3300X still takes a convincing lead in the discrete GPU test suite. Again, we can chalk this up to the L3 cache; the 3300X comes with 16MB of L3 compared to the Ryzen 3 5300G's 8MB. 

The Ryzen 3 3300X is a potent chip, but it's still exceedingly rare to find it anywhere near its recommended $120 pricing at retail outlets. Unfortunately you can say the same thing about other competing chips in this price range, too. 

Finally, though the Ryzen 3 5300G trails relatively far behind the more modern AMD chips with hefty amounts of L3 cache, it's worth noting that it easily dispatches the Zen+ Ryzen 5 3400G and the Ryzen 3 3200G. Both of those chips come with the handicap of the multiple-generation-old Zen+ architecture and only 4MB of L3 cache. It's important to bear in mind that those are only available APUs on the market outside of the more expensive Ryzen 5000 models. 

We'll skip the blow-by-blow analysis in the individual game results below because the results are fairly redundant and this certainly isn't the primary target market for the Ryzen 3 5300G.

3D Mark, VRMark, Stockfish Chess Engine on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Borderlands 3 on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Far Cry 5 on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Hitman 2 on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Project CARS 3 on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Red Dead Redemption 2 on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Shadow of the Tomb Raider on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Application Benchmarks, the TLDR

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The charts above provide the geometric mean of several of our application tests (listed in the chart title), representing broader trends in lightly- and multi-threaded applications. Be sure to check our application tests below for performance in specific types of applications. To maintain consistency within our test pool, we conducted all of the tests below with a discrete graphics card handling the display output.

Application Performance Relative to Core i7-11700K
Single-ThreadedMulti-Threaded
Core i7-11700K 8C/16T100%100%
Ryzen 7 5800X 8C/16T98.5%97.8%
Ryzen 7 5700G 8C/16T94.3%86.8%
Ryzen 5 5600X 6C/12T94.6%76.4%
Core i5-11600K 6C/12T98.2%78.3%
Ryzen 5 5600G 6C/12T90.9%68.1%
Core i5-1140088.1%71.4%
Ryzen 3 5300G86%46.2%
Ryzen 7 4750G 8C/16T81.9%76.1%
Ryzen 3 3300X 4C/8T80.2%45.4%
Core i3-1010075.1%39.0%
Ryzen 5 3400G 4C/8T68.8%33.0%
Ryzen 3 3200G 4C/4T64.6%25.3%

The Ryzen 3 5300G is more impressive in our application test suite than it was in the discrete GPU testing. Here we can see the benefits of the Zen 3 architecture shine. The Ryzen 3 5300G is 25% faster in single-threaded work and 40% faster in multi-threaded work than the Ryzen 5 3400G that also comes with four cores and eight threads. The Ryzen 3 5300G is also 7% faster in single-threaded than the Ryzen 3 3300X, but they basically tie in threaded workloads. 

Naturally, the 5600G and 5700G are 5% and ~10% faster, respectively, than the 5300G in single-threaded work, but that's largely due to the 5300G's lower boost clock. The differences are far more pronounced in threaded work —  the 5600G and 5700G are 47% and 87% faster, respectively, with those advantages coming from the increased core counts. 

At a $122 recommended tray pricing that often ends up being in the $160 to $180 range at retail, the Core i3-10100 is a poor comparison to the Ryzen 3 5300G. However, the Cezanne chip walks away with the lead in both single- and multi-threaded work. 

Intel's other chips are more competitive here, but their pricing and a lack of meaningful integrated graphics muddy the waters if you're looking for a blend of both gaming and application prowess.

Rendering Benchmarks on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Remember, the previous-gen Ryzen 5 3400G slots into the same general price range that we would expect for the Ryzen 3 5300G, and it's the only comparable previous-gen APU at retail. The chip trails its more modern counterparts by massive margins in almost all of these threaded workloads, underlining that the Ryzen 3 5300G would be a big leap forward for enthusiasts, if only it were available at retail. 

Encoding Benchmarks on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Our encoding tests include benchmarks that respond best to single-threaded performance, like the quintessential LAME and FLAC examples, but the SVT-AV1 and SVT-HEVC tests represent a newer class of threaded encoders. The Ryzen 3 5300G does surprisingly well with LAME and FLAC as it outpaces the Core i5-11400, but the Intel chip flips the table in the AVX-heavy HandBrake tests. 

Web Browser, Office and Productivity on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Yet another Chrome update has broken out automated web browser benchmarks, but we'll fix that when we move to Windows 11 when the Alder Lake processors arrive. That leaves us with PC Mark 10's built-in Edge test to quantify performance, but be aware that this test responds more to threading than any other type of web browser benchmark. 

Compilation, Compression, AVX Performance on AMD Ryzen 3 5300G

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Frankly, most of these tests aren't terribly relevant to the target audience for this class of chip. They're more important for higher-end chips, but we include them for completeness. Nevertheless, the timed LLVM compilation workload, y-cruncher, and NAMD tests do a wonderful job of illustrating the architectural advances AMD has made as it progressed through the Zen+ 3400G and Zen 2 4750G to the Zen 3 APU era with Cezanne.  

AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Power Consumption and Efficiency 

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It's no secret that Intel has dialed up the power to compete with AMD's powerful Ryzen processors. As such, there are no real surprises here — Intel chips draw more power across the board.

AMD's Zen 3 models are the most power-efficient desktop PC chips we've ever tested, and the Ryzen 5000G series brings that same level of efficiency to the APU lineup, sucking very little power for a superb power-to-performance ratio that easily beats any Intel chip. 

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Here we take a slightly different look at power consumption by calculating the cumulative amount of energy required to perform Blender and x265 HandBrake workloads, respectively. We plot this 'task energy' value in Kilojoules on the left side of the chart. 

These workloads are comprised of a fixed amount of work, so we can plot the task energy against the time required to finish the job (bottom axis), thus generating a really useful power chart. 

Bear in mind that faster compute times, and lower task energy requirements, are ideal. That means processors that fall the closest to the bottom left corner of the chart are best. 

Conclusion

If AMD chose to bring it to retail, the Ryzen 3 5300G would undoubtedly rule the value APU landscape uncontested. The combination of the Zen 3 CPU cores and the Radeon RX Vega graphics engine propel AMD's Ryzen 3 family to new heights, and Intel really has no direct competitor. However, AMD has chosen to keep this chip confined to OEM systems even though it has released the pricier Ryzen 7 5700G and Ryzen 5 5600G to the DIY market. 

Our tests give us a taste of the 5300G's performance, but we don't know how AMD would price the chip. In light of our test results, and considering that AMD wouldn't want to upset its own product stack by pricing the chip at $99 like the previous-gen Ryzen 3 3200G, we think the company would bring the Ryzen 3 5300G to market in the $130 to $150 range. Even at the highest end of that spectrum, the 5300G would be a great value.  

The charts below outline three areas of performance: The geometric mean of our suite of integrated graphics tests at both 1920x1080 (FHD) and 1280x720 resolutions, the geometric mean of performance with a discrete GPU, and performance in single- and multi-threaded workloads. 

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As long as you keep your expectations in check and you're willing to sacrifice fidelity and resolution, the Ryzen 3 5300G's Vega 6 graphics engine provides unmatched performance at our projected price point. At 1280x720, the Ryzen 3 5300G delivers 86% of the gaming performance of the $359 Ryzen 7 5700G, but for 60% less cash (based on our worst-case theoretical pricing). The Ryzen 3 5300G also provides 90% of the 5600G's performance, but for 40% less cash. 

The 5300G provides exceptional 1280x720 gaming performance, but stepping up to 1920x1080 could result in sub-par performance in some triple-A titles if you stick with the standard presets. Naturally, some of this boils down to a subjective measure of what you gauge as playable, but be prepared to sacrifice heavily on fidelity. That said, you won't find better iGPU performance for FHD gaming at this price point. 

The Ryzen 3 5300G is a great overclocker, but most folks purchasing this class of chip won't have the budget for the highest-end gear to squeeze out those last few drops of performance. This is especially important on the memory front, as increased memory throughput greatly impacts iGPU performance. Most will be best served with the cheapest DDR4-3200 kit they can find. If you're a tuner, the chip responds readily to CPU, GPU, memory, and fabric overclocking, so you'll find plenty to tinker with. 

AMD's higher-end 5700G and 5600G have some utility as stop-gap gaming chips that you could use to build a gaming system now, and then complement with a discrete GPU in the future when pricing returns to normal. However, given its lacking performance with a discrete GPU, that approach doesn't make as much sense with the Ryzen 3 5300G. Yes, we would expect the chip to be paired with a drastically lower-end GPU than the 3090 we tested with, but it is clear that the Ryzen 3 5300G's halved L3 cache (it only has 8MB) severely impacts discrete GPU gaming performance. For example, the quad-core Ryzen 3 3300X with the aged Zen 2 architecture was 20% faster than the 5300G in 1080p testing, showing that the 5300G isn't great for pairing with a discrete graphics card. However, there's no doubt that AMD's marketing of L3 as "Game Cache" was spot on, and this also bodes well for the future Ryzen 3D V-Cache models that will come with up to 192MB of L3.

We paired lower-end Intel chips with a cheap GT 1030 graphics card to create comparison systems with similar pricing in our reviews of other Cezanne APUs. That doesn't make as much sense when we step down to the Ryzen 3 5300G — there really isn't a cheap enough Intel chip/discrete GPU combo to compete with the 5300G, especially given the absolutely terrible pricing on low-end chips. That really wouldn't matter anyway — the Ryzen 3 5300G effectively tied the two Intel + GT 1030 combinations in most of our integrated GPU gaming benchmarks. That's incredibly impressive.

The Ryzen 3 5300G performed well in our application tests, too. For instance, the Ryzen 3 5300G is 25% faster in single-threaded and 40% faster in multi-threaded work than the Ryzen 5 3400G that also comes with four cores and eight threads. 

Naturally, choosing Cezanne also means you step back from AMD's standard PCIe 4.0 support to PCIe 3.0. While PCIe 4.0 doesn't deliver any significant gains in gaming performance, that could change in the future with the Windows 11 Direct Storage feature that will utilize NVMe SSDs more fully. You'll also lose out on the (up to) doubled storage throughput for day-to-day file transfers and productivity applications.  

If AMD frees the Ryzen 3 5300G from its OEM shackles, it could be the new budget champion for extreme budget gaming, small form factor (SFF), and HTPC rigs. It would also significantly lower the price of entry to the Zen 3 family. Unfortunately, the company hasn't committed to releasing it to retail.

Like Intel, AMD is prioritizing its more profitable models, so selling a chip that could siphon away from sales of higher-end chips doesn't make good business sense. AMD currently sells the Ryzen 3 5300G to OEMs, but that is part of its strategic efforts to broaden its overall presence with the high-volume OEMs that make up roughly 60% of overall desktop PC sales.

These are dire times in the value CPU market, and all of Intel and AMD's lower-end models suffer from extreme markups and poor-to-nonexistent availability. That doesn't give us much faith that we'll see the 5300G come to retail in the next few months, and definitely not in significant quantities. As such, for extreme budget gaming rigs built around integrated graphics, or if you're looking for a stop-gap chip until the GPU shortage recedes, the Ryzen 5 5600G remains the best choice for the foreseeable future. 

MORE: Best CPUs

MORE: CPU Benchmarks Hierarchy

MORE: All CPUs Content

Ryzen 3 5300G Test System Configurations
AMD Socket AM4 (B550, OEM)Ryzen 7 5700G, Ryzen 5 5600G, Ryzen 3 5300G, 4750G, 3400G, 3200G
ASUS ROG Strix B550-E, HP Pavilion TP01-2066
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600 @ 3200, Kingston DDR4-3200
Intel Socket 1200 (Z590)Core i5-11600K, Core i7-11700K, Core i5-11400, Core i3-10100
ASUS Maximus XIII Hero
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600 - 10th-Gen: Stock: DDR4-2933, OC: DDR4-4000, 11th-Gen varies, outlined above (Gear 1)
AMD Socket AM4 (X570)AMD Ryzen 7 5800X, Ryzen 5 5600X

MSI MEG X570 Godlike
2x 8GB Trident Z Royal DDR4-3600 - Stock: DDR4-3200, OC: DDR4-4000, DDR4-3600
All SystemsGigabyte GeForce RTX 3090 Eagle - Gaming and ProViz applications
Nvidia GeForce RTX 2080 Ti FE - Application tests

2TB Intel DC4510 SSD

EVGA Supernova 1600 T2, 1600W
Open Benchtable

Windows 10 Pro version 2004 (build 19041.450)
CoolingCorsair H115i, Custom loop
Paul Alcorn

Paul Alcorn is the Deputy Managing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He writes news and reviews on CPUs, storage and enterprise hardware.

  • drea.drechsler
    Admin said:
    We benchmarked AMD's unreleased Ryzen 3 5300G in gaming and application workloads to see if it could be a winner in the DIY market.

    AMD Ryzen 3 5300G Review: The Best APU Not on the Market : Read more
    And if it should come on the market it would be, what....the THIRD best APU?

    Where ever it lands, the family of 5700G, 5600G and 5300G seems to make clear that AMD can adequately serve the low-to-mid-range GPU market with APU's that aren't likely to be impacted by miners buying up stock.
    Reply
  • vern72
    I could have used the 5300G two weeks ago when I put together a system because the last one kept on rebooting on its own! But I got the 5600G instead (which I guess as AMD's strategy).
    Reply
  • Giroro
    vern72 said:
    I could have used the 5300G two weeks ago when I put together a system because the last one kept on rebooting on its own! But I got the 5600G instead (which I guess as AMD's strategy).
    What kind of system was randomly rebooting?
    My ryzen 3700x system is also randomly rebooting and I'm having trouble diagnosing it. No blue screen, it just cuts to black and reboots. Usually while using premiere pro.
    It's possibly related to the most recent bios, or my attempts to OC ram/fclk - but I'm still getting the reboots on timings that had been stable for the last year.
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  • cryoburner
    Assuming that AMD would price the 5300G at $150, it would retail for 60% less than $359 5700G and 40% less than the $259 5600G. However, according to our testing, the Ryzen 3 5300G delivers 86% of the gaming performance of the 5700G and 90% of the 5600G at 1280x720. That's a great value if we focus specifically on integrated graphics performance, which is really the only reason to consider buying this chip. However, it's clear that this could siphon away AMD's sales of pricier alternatives.
    Expecting a $150 price point is probably being a bit too optimistic. AMD's limited 7nm manufacturing capacity means they aren't too interested in selling competitive budget offerings right now, which can be seen with the 5600G's pricing. The 5600G's integrated graphics might be notably better than those included with Intel's 6-core, 12-thread processors, but on the CPU side of things, it's not really any faster than an i5-10400 or 11400. And while it's priced at $260, those competing processors can be had for around $180, meaning you are effectively paying an extra $80 for that better IGP.

    And for roughly the same price as a 5600G, you can now get an 8-core, 16-thread i7-10700K, which also falls behind on integrated graphics, but is a decent amount ahead in terms of CPU performance. Those extra cores may not be as much of a concern when comparing an 8-core processor against a 6-core, as both will likely remain relevant for gaming for a number of years when paired with a capable graphics card, but it does become more of a concern with this quad-core part. Just as the 5600G is priced similar to competing 8-core, 16-thread parts, it wouldn't be unexpected for the 5300G to be priced more like 6-core, 12-thread parts. And with some demanding games already choking a bit on 4-core, 8-thread processors, it doesn't exactly seem like the best choice for the long-term. The integrated graphics might be a fair amount better now, but they're still not something anyone interested in gaming performance will want to stick with once GPU prices return to normal.

    Overall, it feels like AMD tacked on at least a good 20% over "expected" pricing across the entire Ryzen 5000 lineup, and it wouldn't be surprising to see them do the same for this part as well. Though perhaps they are waiting until it makes more sense for them to release it at retail for a somewhat more moderate price. Ryzen 5000 processors are already seeing price cuts and increased availability as Intel's Alder Lake release looms, and I would expect additional price cuts to come. Still, if they felt they could launch the 5700G for $360 and the 5600G for $260, the 5300G could easily be $160, if not more. There's also the possibility that it could be another 3300X, released to retail at a fairly competitive price, but with only extremely limited supply that made it more or less unobtainable post-launch. The CPU probably shouldn't be reviewed as if it were a great value, when the pricing and availability are only being guessed upon.
    Reply
  • watzupken
    It is a good APU, but again, not available as standalone purchase. I suspect AMD is aware that they can't produce enough, and that it will also cannibalise their higher end APUs. Truth to be told, I feel people buying APUs are not looking to play some hardcore games. So technically speaking, they don't need something like a 5700G. If I were to spend that much on a APU, it makes more sense to get a 5800X and also a dedicated GPU, since the 5700G is not as fast as the 5800X mainly due to the lack of cache and shared resources with the iGPU.

    Price wise, I don't think it will be cheap since it is a monolithic chip. So it is highly possible that this may be a full fat 5700G (cost the same), but with disabled CPU and GPU CUs.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    cryoburner said:
    Expecting a $150 price point is probably being a bit too optimistic.
    AMD's current pricing being what it is, I would imagine that a retail 5300G would be closer to $200 mainly on account of eliminating the need to separately hunt down what used to be $120 dGPUs to get a minimal gaming system up and running.
    Reply
  • abufrejoval
    Quite contrary to Intel (in the old days) AMD doesn't try to produce 5300G.

    They really try to produce a 5700G (or 5800U) all the time and if they wind up with a lesser chip, it's defect that's recycled as a lesser part, ~50% defective in the case of the 5300G.

    We should be glad TMSC production doesn't produce a significant number of half defective chips.

    And to demand that AMD sacrifice 100% or 75% chips to sell 50% chips is asking them to go against their bottome line.

    Intel has been rumored to go to that extend to protect "their market", AMD seems less inclined.
    Reply
  • vern72
    Giroro said:
    What kind of system was randomly rebooting?
    My ryzen 3700x system is also randomly rebooting and I'm having trouble diagnosing it. No blue screen, it just cuts to black and reboots. Usually while using premiere pro.

    The system in question was a much older system (say Core i5-6xxx). I turned it on and it would start up for two seconds and then turn itself off for two seconds then try to boot again. After a couple dozen times, it would eventually say on but I didn't want to put that much strain on the components because of all that power cycling.
    Reply
  • salgado18
    A bit late, but I think there is something very important missing from this conclusion: the 3400g delivers nearly the same performance in games using the iGPU.

    If a user wants only to game on the iGPU (a low-budget build, an HTPC, etc) the 3400g is as good as the 5300g. I personally think that's a bit disappointing, especially since the 3400g has 11 Vega cores and the 5300g has 6 Vega cores. But it still is a good option, especially because the AM4 platform can easily receive a 16-core processor as an upgrade in the future.

    Because of that, if AMD would release it, it would cost between $170 and $200, and the 3400g would be at $150 or less, like the 3600 fills the gap between a 5600g and the quad-cores. Possibly $200, since the user can choose between a 6-core Zen 2 CPU or a 4-core Zen3 APU at the same price point.
    Reply
  • abufrejoval
    salgado18 said:
    A bit late, but I think there is something very important missing from this conclusion: the 3400g delivers nearly the same performance in games using the iGPU.

    If a user wants only to game on the iGPU (a low-budget build, an HTPC, etc) the 3400g is as good as the 5300g. I personally think that's a bit disappointing, especially since the 3400g has 11 Vega cores and the 5300g has 6 Vega cores. But it still is a good option, especially because the AM4 platform can easily receive a 16-core processor as an upgrade in the future.

    Because of that, if AMD would release it, it would cost between $170 and $200, and the 3400g would be at $150 or less, like the 3600 fills the gap between a 5600g and the quad-cores. Possibly $200, since the user can choose between a 6-core Zen 2 CPU or a 4-core Zen3 APU at the same price point.

    While your observation is true for the iGPU part, the focus of the article is really on how the CPU power of a Zen 3 quad is extremely attractive for the theoretical price point.

    The Ryzen 3000 are Zen+, quite a lesser CPU even if the iGPU is on a similar level. It may still be good enough, perhaps on par with a Kaby Lake, but it's still irrelevant when it's no longer being sold, just as Zen 3 quads aren't yet being sold readily.

    With AM4 nearing its end, 6 and 8 core Zen 3 chips will become even more affordable while they remain available: saving a few $ here and there until you can afford more than 4 cores seems the better option than trying to buy obsolete chips or waiting for enough defects to accumulate.
    Reply