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Gigabyte's Aorus Demonstrates 43-Inch 144Hz Gaming Monitor

Gigabyte
(Image credit: Gigabyte)

VideoCardz reports, citing local media as the source that Gigabyte's Aorus division has demonstrated the company's upcoming 43-inch monitor that features 144Hz refresh rate as well as 1ms MPRT response time. Gigabyte's Aorus FV43U will be the industry's third 43-inch display that boasts a combination of a large 43-inch size, a 4K resolution, accurate colors, and a 144Hz refresh rate. 

At a rare showcase in Vietnam, Gigabyte demonstrated its upcoming Aorus FV43U 43-incher that uses a 43-inch 10-bit panel featuring a 3840 x 2160 resolution, 1000 nits brightness in HDR mode, a 1 ms motion picture response time (MPRT), 178º / 178º viewing angles, and a 144 Hz refresh rate.

While there is no word whether the new FV43U unit supports any kind of variable refresh rate technology, VESA's Adaptive-Sync is present on many gaming LCDs, so it wouldn't be a stretch to expect the Aorus FV43U to support this capability. There is also no word on whether the FV43U has an HDMI 2.1 input, which in the case of this product would be logical as it is positioned as a console gaming monitor for Microsoft's Xbox Series X as well as Sony's PlayStation 5. 

Gigabyte enhanced the backlighting of the Aorus FV43U with quantum dots, so the the LCD can reproduce 97% of the DCI-P3 color gamut. Also, the Aorus FV43U is DisplayHDR 1000 certified, so expect it to support at least HDR10 transport for HDR content. 

To date, only Acer and Asus have introduced 43-inch gaming monitors with a 144Hz refresh rate, so Gigabyte's Aorus FV43U will be in a good company. 

Some retailers in Asia are reportedly taking preorders on the Aorus FV43U, so expect the product to hit the market shortly to compete with the best 4K gaming monitors. At present the unit reportedly costs around $1,500, which is in line with pricing of competing LCDs with the same features, but we have no idea about its MSRP in the U.S. and Europe. 

  • Kamen Rider Blade
    Why is it that Pixel density for monitors hasn't really increased dramatically?

    This 43" 4K panel @ 3840 x 2160 is only 102.46 PPI

    My current 24" 1920x1200 panel is 94.34 PPI.

    Smart Phones and other displays have dramatically improved the PPI ratio, yet DeskTop Monitors hasn't really increased by much for the vast majority of panels.
    Reply
  • Chrys
    Kamen Rider Blade said:
    Why is it that Pixel density for monitors hasn't really increased dramatically?

    This 43" 4K panel @ 3840 x 2160 is only 102.46 PPI

    My current 24" 1920x1200 panel is 94.34 PPI.

    Smart Phones and other displays have dramatically improved the PPI ratio, yet DeskTop Monitors hasn't really increased by much for the vast majority of panels.

    You can pick up a 24" 4k monitor that has 458ppi. Few people have video cards capable of displaying 8k. Gamers care more about high fps over higher resolution. Few people sit close enough to their monitors that they can even perceive a difference between 100ppi and 1kppi.
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    Kamen Rider Blade said:
    Why is it that Pixel density for monitors hasn't really increased dramatically?

    This 43" 4K panel @ 3840 x 2160 is only 102.46 PPI

    My current 24" 1920x1200 panel is 94.34 PPI.

    Smart Phones and other displays have dramatically improved the PPI ratio, yet DeskTop Monitors hasn't really increased by much for the vast majority of panels.
    If you use Windows, running at something other than 100% DPI scaling can still be problematic with some apps. I've got a 17-inch laptop with a 4K display, but I actually prefer running at 2560x1440 100% scaling instead of 4K with 150% scaling. I think a 43-inch 4K desktop monitor would be just about perfect for my needs. 4K 28-inch (what I currently use) tends to be too pixel dense and so I end up setting Chrome to 150% scaling on a lot of sites. Once you get pixels down to a certain size, making the pixels even smaller doesn't really matter much for the user experience, but it can up the hardware requirements.
    Reply
  • Bamda
    So this monitor will be cheaper then the graphics card.
    Reply