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Acer Nitro XV282K 4K Monitor Review: Pixel Density Meets 144 Hz

A 28-incher with a high level of detail at gaming-ready speeds

Acer Nitro XV282K 4K
(Image: © Acer)

To read about our monitor tests in-depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test PC Monitors. We cover brightness and contrast testing on page two.

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

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Acer Nitro XV282K

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Acer Nitro XV282K

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Acer Nitro XV282K

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The XV282K is rated for 320 nits in SDR mode, but our sample couldn’t quite get there. It measured a tad shy of 280 nits, which is less bright than other monitors in the class but is bright enough for most environments. If you work outside or right near a very sunny, large window though, you may find yourself wishing for more. Black levels are about average, as is contrast, which just cracks the 1,000:1 level. Some of the latest IPS screens are measuring over 1,200:1, as the Viotek does here. And of course, a VA panel like the FV43U will deliver the most native contrast.

After Calibration to 200 nits

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Acer Nitro XV282K

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Acer Nitro XV282K

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Acer Nitro XV282K

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Calibration (see our recommended settings on page 1) bought us a few more contrast points, but the images looked identical. 1,070.7:1 is a respectable value for any IPS monitor. The XV282K delivers a sharp and saturated image with decent black levels and good dimension.

ANSI contrast drops to 894.2:1 but the XV282K retains its third-place position. Quality control is appropriate for the Acer’s price point, and we’re satisfied that it performs on par with its cost and design expectations.

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Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.
  • Joseph_138
    Holy crap, that price! This is obviously not a monitor for the masses. Just having a PC that can run games at 4k144 is going to cost you many thousands of dollars. This is a rich kids toy.
    Reply
  • Kridian
    $1,059.99!?They can f*#@ right off.
    Reply
  • zodiacfml
    at $900, definitely a price improvement vs getting a 4K120 OLED TV. Still a long way to go
    Reply
  • wifiburger
    all these 4k high refresh panels are worthless at these price points.
    In no way I'm paying 4x the cost vs a good 4k 60hz panel !

    I think I'll step down to 1440p panel in the future if I need high refresh rate.
    Reply