Skip to main content

AOC Agon AG493UCX Monitor Review: 4 Feet of Mega-Wide Gaming Goodness

A 49-inch, 32:9 curved panel is no joke when it comes to gaming.

AOC Agon AG493UCX
(Image: © AOC)

As an HDR-capable gaming monitor, the AG493UCX should deliver extended color along with solid grayscale and gamma accuracy. It does so and can be enjoyed without calibration, but there are gains had from a few adjustments.

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

Image 1 of 2

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 2

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Default grayscale tracking isn’t too bad with just a few errors when brightness is at 50-100%. The decline in green meant some highlights looked a little purple. Gamma runs a little dark, but that’s acceptable in a high-contrast VA monitor. Although we’d prefer it track at 2.2 instead of 2.3, this error didn’t greatly impact the image

The second chart shows results after our calibration (see our recommended settings on page 2). Calibration made all visible errors go away unless at 100% brightness, which is still a bit over the 3 Delta E (dE) threshold, meaning you’ll be able to see the error with the naked eye. You might see a purple tint in the brightest highlights, but most image material won’t be affected. Gamma is the same at just over 2.3 average.

We tried the other two presets, but they were far too light and only served to wash out the picture.

Comparisons

Image 1 of 4

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 4

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 4

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 4 of 4

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

An average grayscale error of 3.44dE isn’t screaming for calibration, but we recommend performing one anyway. You can see the AG493UCX got a significant improvement in the second chart with a pro-level 0.99dE score.

If you want to work or play in the sRGB realm, the grayscale error is a reasonable 3.69dE with no adjustment possible.

Though gamma is a bit darker than 2.2, the AG493UCX delivered tight tracking with a tiny 0.14 range of values. That’s on par with the best displays we’ve tested. All the monitors here have excellent gamma.The 2.31 average value represents a 5% deviation, which isn’t as good as the very best but is acceptable for a high-contrast VA panel such as this.

Color Gamut Accuracy

For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

Image 1 of 3

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 3

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 3 of 3

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The AG493UCX is set by default to display its full native DCI-P3 color gamut. You can choose sRGB from the color temp options to use the smaller spec if you wish.

Out-of-the-box color accuracy was quite good with no visible errors and a solid average of 2.83dE. Calibration reduced that to 2.17dE. The only shortfall is in the green primary, which came up a bit short of the full DCI green.

sRGB mode measured very well with a slight hue error in cyan and a little over-saturation of the inner blue targets.

Comparisons

Image 1 of 2

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Image 2 of 2

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

We have no complaints about the AG493UCX’s color accuracy. Even without calibration, its gamut is very close to all targets. Only the green primary is a bit under-saturated from the full DCI-P3 spec. sRGB is also completely usable, even for those engaged in color-critical work.

According to our testing, the AG493UCX covers 81.3% of the DCI-P3 gamut volume, which is crucial for HDR. That’s near the low end of the scale among the HDR monitors we’ve reviewed. However, green is the only primary that comes up short. The extra color available with HDR was completely  visible on the AG493UCX.

With sRGB volume at an excellent 97.06%, you can work on photos with precision, but we recommend a custom profile for best results.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test Monitors

MORE: All Monitor Content

  • JohnBonhamsGhost
    this thing is insanely wide, maybe too wide. though i would love to try it.
    how many games out there do you think would actually support 32:9?
    Reply
  • remosito
    Too wide for my tastes. Still waiting on a 5040x2160p 21:9 50incher with VRR and 120Hz HDR.
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    Yet another monitor to choose from.
    Reply
  • A Stoner
    remosito said:
    Too wide for my tastes. Still waiting on a 5040x2160p 21:9 50incher with VRR and 120Hz HDR.
    I dunno, at 50 inches wide that would be a very tall monitor, you would get crane neck syndrome using it...
    Reply
  • JohnBonhamsGhost
    remosito said:
    Too wide for my tastes. Still waiting on a 5040x2160p 21:9 50incher with VRR and 120Hz HDR.
    A Stoner said:
    I dunno, at 50 inches wide that would be a very tall monitor, you would get crane neck syndrome using it...
    it can be a nice gaming solution but you need to be sitting quite a few feet away. had a 40.5" as my secondary gaming display for a year or two and it was nice with the Corsair Lapdog keyboard/mouse setup and my chair pushed back ~4'.
    Reply
  • Ellimist
    This looks like its based off the samsung panel. The CRG90 which is 120hz same res but with quantum dot. Lets see a review of that. Its not really a replacement for the CHG90 like mentioned considering the Samsung CRG9 has been out for quite some time.

    The only downside to these is that you can't run 120hz and 10bit color. you max out at 100hz and 10bit if you don't want to use compression because of DP1.4. While its not a big downer I'm surprised you missed it in the negatives.

    The next Samsung ultrawide the G9 solves all the problems with color and refresh because it uses DP2.0 so it has the bandwidth. the only thing I'm not sure about is the 1000R curve as I find the 1800R curve good for productivity use as well as gaming. i'm not sure if 1000R will meet my productivity needs or not.
    Reply
  • Brillis Wuce
    This product is DOA.
    Samsung CRG9 has the same specs, but with Quantum Dot and HDR1000.
    It's marked up at the moment ($1287), but I've seen it drop down to $1100 on sale.
    I'd gladly sacrifice the 10bit color for a full HDR1000.
    Reply
  • mac_angel
    I'm happy with my three Samsung RU8000 55" in surround mode. about 10' and 7680x1440@120Hz including HDR
    Reply
  • CharlesVee
    JohnBonhamsGhost said:
    this thing is insanely wide, maybe too wide. though i would love to try it.
    how many games out there do you think would actually support 32:9?

    Almost all current and last gen 3D games, 2D not so much, they're usually confined to 16:9. I was running a triple monitor surround setup all the way back in 2013, that's 7680x1440 and I got almost every game I played to run that way using simple tools like Flawless Widescreen, even the original Bioshock.

    As for this monitor, it's very close to what I'm looking for, I'll probably end up buying either this or the Samsung equivalent. I don't want multiple monitors, I already sold the other two quite a while ago and now I'm suffering the productivity consequences of being confined to one screen! It's frustratingly constricting. The only thing I'd like is for it to be taller than a 27", same ratio just a few inches larger, but I don't think a monitor like that will be coming any time soon and I've already waited two years so I'm going to settle.
    Reply