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AOC Agon AG493UCX Monitor Review: 4 Feet of Mega-Wide Gaming Goodness

A 49-inch, 32:9 curved panel is no joke when it comes to gaming.

AOC Agon AG493UCX
(Image: © AOC)

Many of today’s gaming monitors are similar in features and performance. The differences seem to shrink with each new model introduction. The upside is that it’s more difficult to make a bad choice. Even HDR and extended color, namely DCI-P3, are easier to find with many value-priced models including both.

A deciding factor then is size and shape. Do you go with a traditional 16:9 flat screen or a curved one? Or perhaps an ultra-wide or a big-format gaming display if the budget allows. Now we have the mega-wide category. A few years ago, few would have imagined a 32:9 curved panel, but here we are, and the AOC Agon AG493UCX is a great example.

(Image credit: AOC)

Putting two 27-inch panels on the desk is a dream of many. The extra width provides desktop real estate for workday tasks and a great feel for gaming. But there are the issues of cabling and that annoying line (aka bezels) between screens.The 32:9 curved screen solves these problems neatly. Obviously, there’s no line; and hookup is the same as any other single monitor.

The AG493UCX answered the wish we made after reviewing the Samsung CHG90 – more resolution. With 5120 x 1440 pixels, density is the same 109 pixels per inch (ppi) as a 27-inch QHD monitor. This is still our favorite because it hits the sweet spot between performance and image quality. 4K gaming monitors are great, but it requires substantial graphics hardware to achieve high frame rates. Our gaming experience with the Agon delivered over 60 fps with a Radeon R9 285 graphics card and FreeSync. We even got it to run G-Sync, even though it’s not officially certified to do so, and used a GTX 1080 Ti to hit 80-100fps with detail maxed in several demanding titles.

The Agon sells for around $1,000 at this writing. That’s at least 50% less than the next most expensive big-format display, the Acer Predator CG437K, and significantly cheaper than screens like the Acer Predator X35 ($2,180) or massive HP Omen X 65 Emperium ($3,800). If you can clear off enough desktop space, this mega-wide panel is an ideal gaming monitor for those who want maximum width without relocating to the living room. For desktop gaming, the AG493UCX is one of the best choices available now.

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Christian Eberle
Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors.
  • JohnBonhamsGhost
    this thing is insanely wide, maybe too wide. though i would love to try it.
    how many games out there do you think would actually support 32:9?
    Reply
  • remosito
    Too wide for my tastes. Still waiting on a 5040x2160p 21:9 50incher with VRR and 120Hz HDR.
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    Yet another monitor to choose from.
    Reply
  • A Stoner
    remosito said:
    Too wide for my tastes. Still waiting on a 5040x2160p 21:9 50incher with VRR and 120Hz HDR.
    I dunno, at 50 inches wide that would be a very tall monitor, you would get crane neck syndrome using it...
    Reply
  • JohnBonhamsGhost
    remosito said:
    Too wide for my tastes. Still waiting on a 5040x2160p 21:9 50incher with VRR and 120Hz HDR.
    A Stoner said:
    I dunno, at 50 inches wide that would be a very tall monitor, you would get crane neck syndrome using it...
    it can be a nice gaming solution but you need to be sitting quite a few feet away. had a 40.5" as my secondary gaming display for a year or two and it was nice with the Corsair Lapdog keyboard/mouse setup and my chair pushed back ~4'.
    Reply
  • Ellimist
    This looks like its based off the samsung panel. The CRG90 which is 120hz same res but with quantum dot. Lets see a review of that. Its not really a replacement for the CHG90 like mentioned considering the Samsung CRG9 has been out for quite some time.

    The only downside to these is that you can't run 120hz and 10bit color. you max out at 100hz and 10bit if you don't want to use compression because of DP1.4. While its not a big downer I'm surprised you missed it in the negatives.

    The next Samsung ultrawide the G9 solves all the problems with color and refresh because it uses DP2.0 so it has the bandwidth. the only thing I'm not sure about is the 1000R curve as I find the 1800R curve good for productivity use as well as gaming. i'm not sure if 1000R will meet my productivity needs or not.
    Reply
  • Brillis Wuce
    This product is DOA.
    Samsung CRG9 has the same specs, but with Quantum Dot and HDR1000.
    It's marked up at the moment ($1287), but I've seen it drop down to $1100 on sale.
    I'd gladly sacrifice the 10bit color for a full HDR1000.
    Reply
  • mac_angel
    I'm happy with my three Samsung RU8000 55" in surround mode. about 10' and 7680x1440@120Hz including HDR
    Reply
  • CharlesVee
    JohnBonhamsGhost said:
    this thing is insanely wide, maybe too wide. though i would love to try it.
    how many games out there do you think would actually support 32:9?

    Almost all current and last gen 3D games, 2D not so much, they're usually confined to 16:9. I was running a triple monitor surround setup all the way back in 2013, that's 7680x1440 and I got almost every game I played to run that way using simple tools like Flawless Widescreen, even the original Bioshock.

    As for this monitor, it's very close to what I'm looking for, I'll probably end up buying either this or the Samsung equivalent. I don't want multiple monitors, I already sold the other two quite a while ago and now I'm suffering the productivity consequences of being confined to one screen! It's frustratingly constricting. The only thing I'd like is for it to be taller than a 27", same ratio just a few inches larger, but I don't think a monitor like that will be coming any time soon and I've already waited two years so I'm going to settle.
    Reply