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Custom-Binned 5.3 GHz Intel Core i7-8086K Goes On Sale For $860

The limited-edition Intel Core i7-8086K hexa-core processor is Intel’s way of paying homage to the 40th anniversary of its iconic 8086 microprocessor that set the foundations for the x86 architecture.

The Intel Core i7-8086K isn’t just a simple trophy for processor collectors, though. It’s actually the first processor in the company’s history to ship with a turbo frequency of 5 GHz out of the box. Unfortunately, Intel only guarantees that frequency on a single core. Enthusiasts who want to take advantage of the chip’s full potential will have to overclock the remaining five cores manually. Given the inconsistency between processors, it’s safe to say that not all Intel Core i7-8086K samples can run stable at 5 GHz on all six cores. Also, not everyone is fond of spending enormous amounts of time to overlock their processors. That’s where Silicon Lottery comes in.

Silicon Lottery, a company dedicated to selling pre-overclocked processors, announced yesterday the availability of the Intel Core i7-8086K processors on its website. Unlike Intel, Silicon Lottery’s processors run at the advertised speed across all cores. The Texas-based company currently offers four models to the enthusiast crowd. The 5 GHz binned model is stable with a 1.4V CPU Vcore and costs $469.99, while the company bumped the slightly-faster 5.1 GHz model's Vcore up to 1.41V and the price to $499.99. The third model can run at 5.2 GHz with 1.425V and costs $589.99. The highest-binned model clocks in at an impressive frequency of 5.3 GHz with a CPU Vcore of 1.435V. However, it carries an eye-watering $859.99 price tag.

The cherry-picked Intel Core i7-8086K processors have all received the delid treatment from Silicon Lottery. The company has replaced Intel’s stock thermal compound with Thermal Grizzly’s high-performance Conductonaut liquid metal compound, which can lower peak core temperatures anywhere from 15°C to 25°C. Just as if you were buying a processor from Intel itself, Silicon Lottery ships its processors with the original packaging. They also back them up with a one-year warranty that includes a one-time replacement.

  • AlistairAB
    Another suspicious posting. Paid content? Silicon lottery uses an AVX offset of 200 mhz (not mentioned in this article or at other sites with the same news piece).

    You're paying all that money for 5.1ghz, since AVX will be used in almost all cases. Not 5.3ghz in any real sense.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    People buying these must be desperate for more speed now, because Intel will eventually get their 10 nm process of the ground (and AMD is already well on their way to shipping "7 nm" chips), at which point these probably won't seem quite so fast.

    Remember, it's no longer collectible once you install it (not to mention overclocking...).
    Reply
  • USAFRet
    21068292 said:
    People buying these must be desperate for more speed now, because Intel will eventually get their 10 nm process of the ground (and AMD is already well on their way to shipping "7 nm" chips), at which point these probably won't seem quite so fast.

    Remember, it's no longer collectible once you install it (not to mention overclocking...).

    There's always been a market for those people (more money than brain) who have to have the new shiny right now. Just because it exists.
    Reply
  • redgarl
    OMG... the greed...
    Reply
  • redgarl
    Ohhh they even delided their own CPU because they couldn't stand the thermal paste... Kudos Intel!
    Reply
  • TheOtherOne
    It's none of MY business what someone else does with their money. If one can afford and want to buy this, who the heck am I to question that?
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21068587 said:
    Ohhh they even delided their own CPU because they couldn't stand the thermal paste... Kudos Intel!
    No. When something seems surprising like that, it's a clue that maybe you should go back and re-read it.

    Silicon Lottery, a company dedicated to selling pre-overclocked processors, announced yesterday the availability of the Intel Core i7-8086K processors on its website. Unlike Intel, Silicon Lottery’s processors run at the advertised speed across all cores. The Texas-based company currently offers four models to the enthusiast crowd.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21068744 said:
    It's none of MY business what someone else does with their money. If one can afford and want to buy this, who the heck am I to question that?
    And who's saying you should? They're just reporting that it's available.

    Maybe some readers of the article went on to buy one of these, while others indulged in moral outrage. Both are valid reactions.
    Reply
  • Zaporro
    21067731 said:
    Another suspicious posting. Paid content? Silicon lottery uses an AVX offset of 200 mhz (not mentioned in this article or at other sites with the same news piece).

    You're paying all that money for 5.1ghz, since AVX will be used in almost all cases. Not 5.3ghz in any real sense.

    Finally a post that makes sense. Of course downvoted by i don't know who.

    Maybe AVX offset was thing few years ago but currently more and more application and even games will use AXV instruction for higher performance.

    Setting negative AVX offset is nothing more like cheating "Hey i got 5.3GHz stable OC, lets ignore how 50% of time its actually an 5.1GHz....".

    People who say "i set avx offset for lower temps" practically say "i want to get to 5.3 but my cooling is to weak so ill do 5.1 and make it look like 5.3 for bigger epeen".

    The whole AVX offset thing is like buying 4x4 car and then using it exclusively in city because owner is afraid to get it dirty and wear off its suspension/transmission.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    21069288 said:
    21067731 said:
    Another suspicious posting. Paid content? Silicon lottery uses an AVX offset of 200 mhz (not mentioned in this article or at other sites with the same news piece).

    You're paying all that money for 5.1ghz, since AVX will be used in almost all cases. Not 5.3ghz in any real sense.
    Finally a post that makes sense. Of course downvoted by i don't know who.
    Not me, but whats the stock AVX2-offset on these CPUs?

    21069288 said:
    currently more and more application and even games will use AXV instruction for higher performance.
    Not really. First, it has to be dense AVX2 code - not just a few instructions thrown in here and there.

    Second, it's not used in most OS code, most Javascript, or software development tools. The most compute intensive thing I do on my boxes is compiling software, where AVX-family instructions are virtually useless.
    Reply