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Gigabyte G27QC Review: Curve, Contrast, Crushing Speed

The Gigabyte G27QC 27-inch gaming monitor offers HDR, 165 Hz and a lot more for the money.

Gigabyte G27QC
(Image: © Gigabyte)

To read about our monitor tests in-depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test PC Monitors. We cover brightness and contrast testing is covered on page two.

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

To compare the G27QC’s performance, we have a collection of 27-inch QHD screens. There's the Cooler Master GM27-CF, ViewSonic Elite XG270QC, Asus ROG Strix XG279Q and Aorus FI27Q. We also included the Gigabyte G32QC, which packs the same specs into a 32-inch QHD panel.

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Gigabyte G27QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G27QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G27QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The G27QC offers average brightness with a maximum of just over 318 nits. For gaming, video and apps; this is plenty of light in an indoor environment. Where this monitor excels is in its black levels which are the lowest of the bunch with the backlight turned up all the way. As you can see, Gigabyte manages some impressive contrast numbers for both its screens; over 4000:1 for the G27QC. Only its stablemate, the G32QC boasts more dynamic range. This bodes well for SDR and HDR content alike. 

After Calibration to 200 nits

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Gigabyte G27QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G27QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
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Gigabyte G27QC

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

When the playing field is leveled at 200 nits, the G32QC squeaks ahead in the calibrated black level test. But the G27QC is still comfortably darker than the other panels. This is why VA is our tech of choice for gaming monitors. Contrast is king. Even with adjustment, contrast is still nearly 4000:1 in SDR mode. It doesn’t get much better without a FALD backlight.

An ANSI contrast ratio over 3000:1 is a rare achievement for any monitor. Both Gigabyte screens can manage it. Image depth is superb and with so much contrast available, this QHD screen could pass for a 4K resolution monitor. A wide dynamic range goes a long way towards improving perceived resolution. The G27QC looks stunning.

MORE: Best Gaming Monitors

MORE: How We Test Monitors

MORE: All Monitor Content

  • maestro0428
    This is right up my alley. Ive been looking for a larger monitor to game on. And it's actually a good value. Wish it was flat though as the curve is just a marketing gimmick if you ask me. Do they have a flat version?
    Reply
  • Selcuk Estel
    maestro0428 said:
    This is right up my alley. Ive been looking for a larger monitor to game on. And it's actually a good value. Wish it was flat though as the curve is just a marketing gimmick if you ask me. Do they have a flat version?

    Yes there's a flat one of the same model aptly named G27Q without the C at the end. (C=curve)
    Reply
  • QSV
    I will never understand how tech sites can recommend any VA monitors for gaming with their huge issues like black smearing and certain flickering textures.
    Reply
  • veldrane2
    cons:
    27"
    2k
    VA for gaming ...

    27" - been on it for about a decade now, its time to move up
    2k - not even a wide 2k, just 2k, in light of the new GPUs and upcoming CPUs, seriously ?
    VA - VA for gaming is hit and miss at best, usually its the miss despite marketing claims.
    Curved - preger flat,though this isn't necessarily a con as some people might prefer curved so I did not list it as such.
    Reply