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Best Wireless Mouse 2022: Premium Productivity Mice

best wireless mouse
No matter your focus, we've got the best wireless mouse pick for you. (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Id you just want your desk clear of clutter, any wireless mouse will do. But only one of the best wireless mice will also track well, feel comfortable and intuitive in your hand for hours, maintain long battery life and help you get work done. 

Gamers who cut their mouse cord still need a fail-safe connection that doesn't introduce lag. This list focuses on productivity mice, but check out our best gaming mouse page if you're primarily interested in peripherals for improving your game. 

For work, meanwhile, you may want multi-device control and/or the option for Bluetooth so that you can connect with multiple devices without a USB dongle. And who doesn't like extra programmable buttons or long-lasting battery life? 

And, of course, pairing your pointer with one of the best wireless keyboards also makes sense for the best input experience.

There are an slew wireless mice available today -- so many that it can easily be overwhelming. So here are some things to consider before seeking out the best wireless mouse for your needs.

Shopping Tips: Find the Best Wireless Mouse

  • Shape and comfort: Mouse shape and design play prominent roles in how effective a cursor-controlling tool it is. The best wireless mouse feels like a natural extension of your arm, rather than a clunky or cheap-feeling hunk of plastic hindering your productivity.

    It's helpful to consider how you grip or hold your mouse to know where you'll want more or less height or width. Of course, the size of your hands will also play a role in choosing the best wireless mouse for you.
  • Bluetooth or dongle? Some of the best wireless mice let you connect via Bluetooth, which won't eat up a USB port, or via a USB Type-A 2.4 GHz dongle. However, somer wireless mice will make you choose between one or the other.

    If you're only going to use your mouse with one PC, consider one that connects through a USB receiver -- especially if you're going to game with it on the side. Generally, you can get a reliable, lag-free connection this way. Bonus points if there's dongle storage inside the mouse, so you don't lose it when it's not plugged in.

    Bluetooth connections, meanwhile, let you easily connect to and switch between multiple PCs or even tablets and other devices. You will often get better battery life while using Bluetooth. Plus, more desktops and most laptops have Bluetooth these days. Bluetooth does come with a higher risk of perceptible lag, though.
  • USB charging or batteries? USB-charging mice often cost more, but you'll never have to buy batteries. If the mouse charges over USB-C, it should also recharge quicker than alternatives while using an increasingly standard cable.

    Mice running on AA or AAA batteries are usually cheaper than their rechargeable rivals, and batteries are easy to find if you run out unexpectedly and often last longer than the built-in batteries in most mice.

The Best Wireless Mouse You Can Buy Today

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Wireless Mouse for Most

Specifications

Sensor: Logitech Darkfield Laser
Connectivity: Bluetooth LE or Logi Bolt (Up to 3 devices)
Battery: Up to 70 days (USB-C charging)
Weight: 0.31 pounds (141g)
Dimensions (LxWxH): 4.9 x 3.3 x 2 inches (124.9 mm x 84.3 x 51 mm)

Reasons to buy

+
Magnetic scroll wheel switches from smooth to ratchet
+
Highly customizable via software
+
Switches between up to 3 devices
+
Great build rubberized feel
+
Secondary scroll wheel

Reasons to avoid

-
Device switching button on bottom
-
Polarizing button feel
-
Thumb button awkwardly placed

With an MSRP of $99, the Logitech MX Master 3S isn’t the cheapest mouse on this list, but it’s worth every penny because it will make you more productive if you make use of all its features. The 3S combines a comfortable, sculpted design with helpful features such as an electromagnetic scroll wheel, a separate thumb wheel, and a ton of customization options. It can also use Logi Flow software to switch its connection seamlessly between three different devices, even carrying the clipboard contents with it.

Logitech MX Master 3S’s scroll wheel is one of its most impressive features, letting you toggle between a smooth or a ratcheted feel with either the press of a button, or automatically based on how fast you spin it. A second thumb wheel on the left side allows you to perform tasks such as zooming in or out of documents, scrolling horizontally in spreadsheets, or raising and lowering your system volume. 

The mouse has six configurable buttons — seven if you include pushing down on the scroll wheel — which you can set to do different things in different apps. So, for example, you could have the side buttons perform forward and back functions in your browser but act as Pg Up and Pg Dn in a word processor. 

The MX Master 3S has two noticeable improvements over its very-similar predecessor, the MX Master 3. The sensor now goes all the way up to 8,000 DPI, which means that you can get much faster movement, a boon if you have multiple monitors to move your cursor through. And the right and left click buttons have quiet switches which will be barely audible to your coworkers or housemates. 

Read: Logitech MX Master 3S Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Wireless Ergonomic Mouse

Specifications

Sensor: Not disclosed
Connectivity: USB Type-A dongle or Bluetooth LE
Battery: Rechargeable over USB-C
Weight: 4.12 ounces (116.8g)
Dimensions (LxWxH): 4.69 x 2.93 x 1.69 inches (119.13 x 74.42 x 42.93mm)

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable, made for small/medium hands
+
Left-handed option
+
Quiet
+
Advanced productivity features such as per-app profiles and Logitech Flow

Reasons to avoid

-
AA battery
-
DPI button unusable
-
Not for larger hands

The Logitech Lift is an ergonomic wireless mouse designed for users with small- to medium-sized hands — it’s not for everyone, but it’s nice to see an option for users who might not find the larger Logitech MX Vertical comfortable to use. The Lift also comes in both right-handed and left-handed versions, making it one of the only ergonomic mouse options for left-handed users (though while the right-handed version comes in pink, white, and graphite, the left-handed version only comes in the latter). 

The Lift has a vertical design, which puts your hand at an “optimal” 57-degree angle — also known as the “handshake angle.” This angle is more natural than the typical horizontal angle mice normally have, but this design does lift your hand away from your desk. If you’re used to a regular mouse, it may take you some time to get used to this new position (and you may never get used to it, especially if you work with very precise movements — it’s harder to be precise when your hand is further from the desk). 

The Lift is a productivity mouse; it works with Logitech’s Logi Options+ software and includes Logitech’s productivity features such as Logitech Flow, which lets you switch between three different PCs. Logitech Flow isn’t perfect — there’s a small delay between devices, but it’s an excellent feature for people who switch between a laptop and a desktop, or a laptop and a tablet. 

Read: Logitech Lift Review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

3. Lenovo Go Wireless Vertical Mouse

Best Budget Vertical Mouse

Specifications

Sensor: Ir sensor
Connectivity: 2.4GHz wireless
Battery: 1x Alkaline AA battery
Weight: 129 grams with 2x Alkaline AA battery
Dimensions (LxWxH): 2.48 x 4.09 x 2.44 inches (63mm x 104mm x 62mm)

Reasons to buy

+
2.4 GHz
+
6 programmable buttons
+
Inexpensive

Reasons to avoid

-
Awkward side button placement 

The Lenovo Go Wireless Mouse is a cheaper take on the vertical mouse layout than the Logitech MX Vertical, with a price ranging from $30 - $50 depending on sales, which Lenovo frequently holds. Despite this, it’s got a strong luxury feel thanks to the comfortable and stylish cork side finish, and it also captures most of the MX Vertical’s strengths.

These include the natural, 57-degree “handshake position” angle and the many programmable buttons. There’s one fewer button here than on the MX Vertical, making for a total of 6, but the DPI is much more customizable than on Logitech’s mouse. Here, you get to set 3 specific numbers from 800 to 2400, and you can still swap between them on the fly with a single button press.

Another bonus here is that this mouse only requires one AA battery, as opposed to 2. It’s not a huge savings, especially since the purported battery life is 18 months long, but you’ll more easily be able to recharge this mouse by digging through your junk drawer.

Maybe the most unfortunate change here is to the side button placement. Rather than being in the divot where your thumb rests, like on the MX vertical, the side buttons here instead rest on the mouse’s top edge. You’ll have to strain your thumb to reach them, which hurts this device’s otherwise strong ergonomics.


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)
Best Premium Productivity

Specifications

Sensor: Optical
Connectivity: Razer Hyperspeed 2.4GHz wireless, Bluetooth
Battery: 1 or 2x Alkaline AA battery
Weight: 88 grams with 1x Alkaline AA battery, 111 grams with 2x Alkaline AA battery
Dimensions (LxWxH): 3.94 x 2.46 x 1.34 inches (100.2mm x 62.7mm x 34.2mm)

Reasons to buy

+
Sleek form factor and ergonomics
+
Silent switches and dual-functioning scroll wheel with four-way click
+
2.4GHz and Bluetooth connectivity options
+
7 programmable buttons

Reasons to avoid

-
Software only supports Windows
-
Heavy due to AA batteries

If you’re like me, you spend a lot of time using gaming gear for productivity purposes. Often, it’s the cheapest way to get your hands on gear that approaches professional level features. Razer, known mostly for its gaming peripherals, now wants to address people like you and me by taking the features it’s known for in its gaming products and translating them to a line meant specifically for productivity.

Enter the Razer Pro Click Mini. This mouse is the second productivity focused pointer from Razer, and features quieter switches and a smaller footprint than the first. But unlike other productivity focused mice, it’s also got a high max DPI (12,000), a 1,000Hz polling rate, 7 programmable buttons and 2.4GHz wireless connectivity. Plus, it’s got 5 onboard memory profiles and you can remap buttons, including the 4-way tilt wheel with both infinite and ratcheted scrolling, in Razer Synapse. 

That makes this an especially powerful contender for the office, with lots of versatility and highly responsive input, although its sleek gray and white exterior and comfortable ergonomics mean it’s still at home in your boss’ line of sight.

It’s a bit of a shame that it uses AA batteries instead of being rechargeable, then, especially since those batteries do make it a touch heavier. But with a purported 465 hours of 2.4GHz battery life and 725 hours of Bluetooth battery life, it’s easy to just stuff this in your bag and forget about it for months on end.

Also a perfect mouse for the gamer with a more reserved aesthetic, the Pro Click Mini points to an exciting and more varied future for Razer’s peripherals.

Read: Razer Pro Click Mini review 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

5. Logitech M510

Best Budget Mouse

Specifications

Sensor: Optical
Connectivity: 2.4GHz wireless
Battery: 2x Alkaline AA battery
Weight: 129 grams with 2x Alkaline AA battery
Dimensions (LxWxH): 4.72 x 2.56 x 1.6 inches (120mm x 65mm x 41mm)

Reasons to buy

+
2.4GHz
+
7 programmable buttons
+
Inexpensive
+
Ambidextrous

Reasons to avoid

-
Basic 

What even is a “best mouse,” anyway? Don’t you just need a way to point your cursor without too much delay and without hurting your hands? If this sounds like you, the Logitech M510 will be your new best friend. Its no frills design makes it one of the most inexpensive mice on this list at $20, while its 2.4 GHz connectivity keeps it lagless. Meanwhile, its comfy, ambidextrous body should fit nicely into most hands and its two side buttons are accessible across palm, claw and fingertip grip styles. Its software, Logitech Options, is also robust enough that you can easily get more advanced with it later on, once you’ve started to see the light of fancy mice.

You can set the DPI up to 1000 with Logitech options, for instance, although it’s somewhat obliquely presented as a “pointer speed” slider that refuses to give actual numbers. You can also swap the left and right mouse button functions, easily view battery life and map any number of functions to 5 of the mouse’s buttons. These include keystroke assignments, common functions like copy or paste and even a “gesture” toggle that works with mouse movement to open up even more mappable actions. What’s even better is that you can set the mouse to have different profiles per application.

These Logitech Options features aren’t unique to the 510, but it’s good to know that you can still access them even if you go for the most basic of Logitech’s mice. Speaking of basic, this mouse glides well with its 4 rubber feet and boasts a 24 month battery off its two AAs. At 0.28 pounds, it’s also easy to lift and travel with.

All around, this is a great starter mouse, although its ambidextrous design leaves it with a somewhat underdeveloped thumb rest and it doesn’t have special features like an infinite scroll wheel. 


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

6. Microsoft Modern Mobile Mouse

Best Small Mouse

Specifications

Sensor: Optical
Connectivity: Bluetooth 4.2
Battery: 2x Alkaline AAA battery
Weight: 78 grams with 2x Alkaline AAA battery
Dimensions (LxWxH): 4.22 x 2.37 x 1.01 inches (107.20mm x 60.30mm x 25.80mm)

Reasons to buy

+
Thin
+
Inexpensive
+
Lightweight
+
Lots of colors

Reasons to avoid

-
Basic
-
No extra buttons
-
Low configurability

The Microsoft Modern Mobile Mouse is a thin little credit card of a pointer that presumes that the most comfortable form factor for a mouse is to have as little mouse in your hand as possible. This makes it great for travel and style, especially with its 8 available colors and Bluetooth connectivity. At 78 grams with batteries installed, it’s easy to carry around with you and push around a table. At the same time, its sleek rectangular exterior makes it difficult for certain grip types to handle it, and it doesn’t come with extra buttons or too much configurability.

With just a left button, a right button and a scroll wheel that can’t tilt to the side, this mouse isn’t meant for more than basic work. The scroll wheel’s push-in button can be remapped to input a key combination, open the screen snipping tool or even input a macro, but that’s the most advanced usability you’ll get out of this mouse. Otherwise, all its software will let you do is swap the left and right click, change how fast the wheel scrolls (and in which direction) and adjust your DPI.

The max DPI is higher on this mouse than what you’ll find on other productivity focused entries, though. The minimum DPI is 400 and the maximum is 1800, which means you’ll be able to easily track your cursor across all sorts of resolutions and monitor sizes. 

There’s no doubt that the mouse’s lightweight nature lends it a certain level of comfort, as it doesn’t take much force to use, although it can feel bulky in the hands thanks to its rectangular shape. That’s a bit odd given how small the mouse is, and it doesn’t help that palm grip users don’t have much of a body to rest their palms on.

Still, this is a good mouse for Bluetooth devices, casual use, travel and those who prefer lightweight and small accessories that stay out of the way. It also looks good. But its functions are limited, and it’s not the most comfortable for all types of users.


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

7. Microsoft Arc Mouse

Best Travel-sized Ergonomic Mouse

Specifications

Sensor: Optical
Connectivity: Bluetooth 4.1
Battery: 2x Alkaline AAA battery
Weight: 82.5 grams with 2x Alkaline AAA battery
Dimensions (LxWxH): 5.17 x 2.17 x 0.56 inches (131.31mm x 55.11mm x 14.22mm)

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable curve
+
Inexpensive
+
Lightweight
+
Lots of colors

Reasons to avoid

-
Basic
-
No extra buttons
-
Low configurability
-
No scroll wheel

The Microsoft Arc Mouse is a more ergonomic take on the Microsoft Modern Mobile Mouse that nonetheless loses some functionality in the pursuit of greater comfort. It feels great in the hands, so much so that it actually convinced me to abandon my usual claw grip for a palm grip instead, but its hair trigger button that doesn’t physically distinguish between left and right click zones and its lack of a scroll wheel means that it’s not for everyone.

Let’s start with the positives. The Microsoft Arc Mouse feels like it’s built for my hands, rather than forcing my hands to contort to it. At $80, it’s more than three times the cost of the Modern Mobile Mouse, but is still affordable compared to other ergonomic mice on this list. It also carries over some of the benefits of the Modern Mobile Mouse, including its uncomplicated and lightweight body, stylish look, many color options and easy portability (it can bend flat to fit into bags with no issue).

At the same time, it’s got the same weaknesses as the Modern Mobile Mouse, and then some. Most noticeable and egregious among these is the lack of a scroll wheel or separated left and right click buttons. Taking the Modern Mobile Mouse’s lack of buttons a little further, the Arc Mouse opts to have one clickable touchpad for its input. Clicking the left side works as a left click and clicking the right side works like a right click (although you can swap these), while an optional three-finger-click option can serve as either a middle click or a keyboard combination of your choice. This can take some getting used to at first, as you find where the boundaries between the different options are, but it generally works. However, I did occasionally find myself pushing the button in when I didn’t want to, simply because the mouse is designed so that the weight of your fingers rests on it, and the button itself doesn’t offer much resistance. I can see avoiding this becoming easier with time, but what’s worse is that, instead of a scroll wheel, this mouse wants you to flick your finger to scroll.

This results in stilted scrolling that requires a lot of extraneous flicks, even on the highest sensitivity setting. Not only do you lose precision with this, but you also lose comfort, which goes against the point of the mouse. I did find myself getting better at scrolling with this mouse over time, but it never felt easy, natural or comfortable.

Also a little disappointing is that bending the mouse flat also turns it off, so you can’t use it in this shape if you prefer. Further, the mouse is not built for fingertip or claw grippers, although its elevated backside saw me adopting a palm grip style even though I naturally use a claw grip one.

Because of its comfort, style and easy portability, I can see some people loving this mouse, either as their main pointer or as a backup when travelling. It is a niche pick, but so are most ergonomic mice.


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

8. Logitech Ergo M575 Mouse

Best Trackball Mouse

Specifications

Sensor: Trackball
Connectivity: 2.4 GHz, Bluetooth Low Energy
Battery: 1x Alkaline AA battery
Weight: 145 grams with 1x Alkaline AA battery
Dimensions (LxWxH): 5.28 x 3.94 x 1.89 inches (134mm x 100mm x 48mm)

Reasons to buy

+
No wrist movement needed
+
Compact footprint on desk
+
Ergonomic shape
+
Heavily customizable extra buttons

Reasons to avoid

-
Trackball is only way to move cursor
-
Precise movement can be tricky
-
Can’t moonlight in gaming

The Logitech Ergo M575 Mouse is the hero your strained wrists have been waiting for. With it, you won’t need to move them at all. Just lay your hand on your mouse once, and you’re all set for eight hours straight without needing to move it again (aside from getting up to go to the bathroom). Of course, your thumb will be getting a workout the whole time.

That’s because this mouse uses a trackball to move the cursor. It’s not a new approach, but at $50 and with 2.4GHz and Bluetooth support, the Ergo M575 is more advanced than what you would have gotten in the ‘90s.

Using it will take some practice, of course, but it feels like a dream in your hand. It completely eliminates strain from repetitive motions, and the wide body perfectly contorts to my hand shape. Again, it does require my thumb to do a lot of movement, but if there’s anything decades of gaming has taught me, it’s that my thumbs are pretty resilient when it comes to carpal tunnel syndrome. The rest of my hand, not so much.

Of course, speaking of gaming, not being able to move the mouse’s body itself does come with some struggles. For instance, while this isn’t our best gaming mouse list, let’s not kid ourselves. You’re probably not constantly swapping between a gaming and work mouse with your home setup. If you were hoping to use this mouse to moonlight in games, think again. While its trackball can reach a DPI of up to 2000, it’s harder to do controlled flicks or steady tracking with it. Not common use cases on the job, but very common in games.

Clicking-and-dragging also takes some rewiring at first, as I’m not used to using both my thumb and my index finger when doing so. It took a bit of thought to remember to let go of my index finger when I was done dragging, but not my thumb. Similarly, it can be hard to precisely highlight text with a trackball.

Most of these issues, aside from the mouse not being well-suited to games, are easy enough to fix with practice. And once you do, your wrists will thank you. Your desk might thank you too. While the M575 is a bulky mouse, it also paradoxically has a small footprint because you don’t need to move it when using it. It doesn’t even need a mousepad, making it great for people with small desks or keyboard trays.

Like the Logitech M510, the M575 is compatible with the Logitech Options software, which lets you remap its three extra buttons, check battery level, swap the left/right click and adjust DPI. The customization on offer here is fairly robust, and allows you to set a button to open programs, control media, enter certain key combinations and the like. Plus, you can set the mouse to use different settings depending on which program you have open.

If you like trackball mice, this is one of the best modern options available.


(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

9. Logitech Triathlon M720 Mouse

Best Mouse for Multiple Devices

Specifications

Sensor: Optical
Connectivity: 2.4 GHz, Bluetooth Low Energy
Battery: 1x Alkaline AA battery
Weight: 135 grams with 1x Alkaline AA battery
Dimensions (LxWxH): 4.53 x 2.91 x 1.77 inches (115mm x 74mm x 45mm)

Reasons to buy

+
Easily swap between multiple devices
+
Logitech flow compatible
+
Optional smooth scroll wheel
+
Heavily customizable extra buttons

Reasons to avoid

-
Other mice can also swap between multiple devices 

At first glance, the Logitech Triathlon M720 mouse doesn’t appear to offer much for its $40 price that the more basic, $20 Logitech M510 mouse doesn’t already have. It’s got one extra button hidden away in its left thumb rest, which itself is more prominent than the thumb rest on the M510, plus a switch hidden under the scroll wheel that swaps it between ratcheted and smooth scrolling. But it’s also got one other additional, non-remappable button on its side with a “123” printed next to it. This button is where you’ll find the Triathlon’s unique use case, which is its ability to pair with up to 3 computers at once and swap between them on the fly either with that button or through Logitech Flow.

Logitech Flow is a unique piece of software that allows the Triathlon to easily treat multiple computers like one desktop simply by moving the cursor between their displays. This lets you copy and paste images and files easily, or even just use a laptop as a secondary or tertiary monitor without hassle. Think of it like a software solution for a KVM. All you have to do is pair the Triathlon to each of the PCs you want to use and make sure Logitech Options is installed on each.

In practice, it works almost flawlessly, plus you can add a Logitech keyboard into the mix if you have one. The only major issue is with connectivity standard limitations. To connect to a device, the M720 needs either Bluetooth or a Logitech Unifying Receiver. Since it only comes with a single unifying receiver, you can’t have all of your devices using 2.4 GHz unless you buy individual receivers separately. There’s no issue with connecting multiple Bluetooth devices, however, nor did I have a problem connecting one device via 2.4 GHz and one via Bluetooth.

Less of an issue is that a device’s mouse cursor does not disappear when you move your mouse off of it, which can be mildly annoying if you’re using a laptop as a secondary display.

If you need to quickly move files across devices or just simply do not own a secondary monitor but do have a laptop, Logitech Flow can be a boon to your productivity. But if all you need to do is connect a single mouse to multiple devices and swap between them on the fly, other Logitech mice can also do that.

Take the Ergo M575, which has both 2.4 GHz and Bluetooth compatibility. I easily connected the M575 to one device via 2.4 GHz and one device via Bluetooth, then swapped between them on the fly via the button on the bottom of the mouse that changes the M575’s connectivity standard. It’s a more hack-y solution, and requires you to turn the mouse over every time you want to swap devices rather than using an easy side button, but it does take away one of the Triathlon’s unique strengths.

Nonetheless, the Triathlon is still inexpensive compared to mice like the Ergo M575, and is a good choice if you’re just getting a Logitech productivity mouse and need to use it across multiple devices. It’s comfortable in the hand across all grip styles, easily remappable via the robust Logitech Options software and has access to an always-satisfying smooth scroll wheel.


Finding Discounts on the Best Wireless Mice

Whether you're shopping for one of the best wireless mice or a model that isn't on our list above, you may find some savings by checking out our lists of the latest Best Buy promo codes, Corsair coupon codes, Logitech promo codes, Micro Center coupons, Newegg promo codes, Staples coupons and Razer promo codes.

Michelle Ehrhardt is an editor at Tom's Hardware. She's been following tech since her family got a Gateway running Windows 95, and is now on her third custom-built system. Her work has been published in publications like Paste, The Atlantic, and Kill Screen, just to name a few. She also holds a master's degree in game design from NYU.

With contributions from
  • Findecanor
    I'm browsing the UK version of Tom's Hardware. Why can't weights and measurements be in international units?
    Reply
  • imsurgical
    Let me preface my surprise at this list by stating I own and have religiously used a G Pro Wireless, G903 (original non-lightspeed) and Razer DeathAdder V2 Pro, and am currently using a G305 as my everyday work horse mouse, so I have some semblance of expectations when it comes to wireless gaming mice.

    How does the G305 not make this list? I'm a little confused by that :unsure:. Weight wise, it's in line with most of these expensive mice or better, and if you sub out the battery for a lithium or even AAA converted lithium you're coming in at an 84-85g mouse that has such a long charge time compared to any of these mice listed. I can understand most of the picks, but the Redragon M686 taking a spot as an "affordable wireless gaming" mouse compared to the G305?

    Anyways, interesting quick read, thank you!
    Reply
  • scharhar
    Findecanor said:
    I'm browsing the UK version of Tom's Hardware. Why can't weights and measurements be in international units?

    Your wish is my command :)
    Reply
  • Stave Dan
    I though razer basilisk ultimate should be at first position, i am using this mouse more than a year , it never disappoint me .... however like other sites , great content on best gaming mouse I really appreciate it !
    Reply
  • deesider
    Interesting that Bluetooth gives such a large battery life improvement. I wonder if there is a latency disadvantage, otherwise why bother with using a proprietary dongle?
    Reply
  • Nestea_Zen
    I'll never understand why all these blog websites/articles paste the picture first, above the title. it's called a title for a reason.
    it ALWAYS confuses. especially since the images usually never carry text.

    so much for college educated people.
    Reply
  • Nolonar
    Logitech G502 Lightspeed
    Reasons to avoid:
    - Must RMA every 6 months because at least 1 button will develop double-clicking issues.

    A flaw it shares with the G903, G900, G700, and the G602 (and possibly every other G mouse released in the past decade or so).
    Reply
  • Dankhola
    Doesn't the G-Pro wireless now have the 25K sensor? Or is it the same pixart sensor with a firmware update?
    Reply
  • Old Molases
    Please correct me if i am wrong. Do people using wireless mice for gaming experience delays while gaming?
    Reply
  • Prizm4
    Doesn't Razer software still require you to create a Razer account to use it?

    I bought a Razer mouse years ago and returned it as soon as I saw the software required me to log in just to change the mouse settings 👎
    Reply