Best Wireless Gaming Headsets 2024: Bluetooth, Budget, and More

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A gaming headset is key component of your battle station, especially if you — like most gamers — aren't always in a situation where you can crank up the volume on some of the best PC speakers

Gamers today do more than just game on their PCs. They also work, stream, chat, listen to music, and more; a gaming headset needs to offer more than just the basics. High-quality audio, long-term wearability and comfort, and multi-platform connectivity are all critical factors when it comes to picking out the perfect wireless headset. 

There are tons of wireless headsets to choose from — for gaming and everything else. The sheer number of options can be pretty overwhelming, which is why we're here to help. We've tested dozens of wireless gaming headsets over the years, paying special attention to the specs and features gamers are looking for: Connectivity, latency, audio and microphone quality, comfort, battery life, and (of course) aesthetics. We've come up with the best wireless gaming headsets for every type of gamer — from casual listeners to hardcore content creators, and everything in between. 

If you don't necessarily need a wireless headset, check out our list of best PC gaming headsets for both wired and wireless options. 

Quick List

The Best Wireless Gaming Headsets You Can Buy Today

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Best Wireless Gaming Headset

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Best Wireless Gaming Headset

Specifications

Driver: 40mm custom drivers
Impedance: 38 Ohms
Frequency response: 10-22,000 Hz
Mic: Bidirectional noise canceling, fully retractable
Connectivity: (Simultaneous) Wireless 2.4 GHz and Bluetooth 5.0
Weight: 0.75 pounds (339g)

Reasons to buy

+
Very comfortable
+
Fully-retractable microphone
+
Swappable battery system
+
Very good audio quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
Comes with base station, not GameDAC Gen 2
-
Not super intuitive

The SteelSeries Arctis Nova Pro Wireless is everything you want and need in a gaming headset — and while it's clearly designed around PC gaming, it's got plenty of features that make it a great headset for just about everything else. It sports SteelSeries' custom-designed hi-fi capable 40mm drivers, which have a wireless frequency response of 10 - 22,000 Hz and a wired frequency response of 10 - 40,000 Hz, and has a lightweight, highly-adjustable frame that's comfortable for hours on end.

The Arctis Nova Pro comes with a wireless base station, which can connect to two audio sources (e.g., PC and a console) via dual USB-C ports. You can use the base station to switch between systems or tweak audio settings — it's basically a fancy, dual-system 2.4GHz wireless dongle. It also acts as a charging station for the headset's batteries — the headset comes with two batteries, each of which offers 18 - 22 hours of battery life. The batteries are live-swappable, giving you essentially unlimited battery life so long as you're near the base station.

The Arctis Nova Pro is designed for gaming, but it can easily double as a lifestyle headset thanks to its fully-retractable bidirectional microphone, active noise cancellation, and simultaneous 2.4GHz wireless/Bluetooth connectivity. Priced at $349.99, this headset isn't cheap — but it delivers. But if you're looking for a more budget-friendly option, SteelSeries has carried the Arctis Nova Pro's design (including the retractable mic) over to its Arctis Nova line, which includes the wireless Arctis Nova 7 ($179.99) and the wired Arctis Nova 1 ($59.99).

Read: SteelSeries Arctis Nova Pro Review 

A Tom's Hardware Favorite

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A Tom's Hardware Favorite

Specifications

Driver: 50mm neodymium
Impedance: 32 Ohms
Frequency response: 20-40,000 Hz
Mic: Omnidirectional
Connectivity: 3.5mm, USB Type-A cable, USB Type-A dongle, Bluetooth
Weight: 0.8 pounds (362.9g)

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable and classy
+
Simultaneous dongle/Bluetooth connectivity lets you hear your phone and PC 

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive
-
Battery life isn't great when connected to two devices 

Three Tom's Hardware editors use either Corsair's Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT or its 2.4GHz-only Virtuoso RGB Wireless SE as their daily drivers. The Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT has specs similar to the Arctis Nova Pro, including simultaneous 2.4GHz wireless/Bluetooth connectivity, hi-fi capable 50mm drivers, and a comfortable, premium build. The Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT retails for $270, but you can pretty consistently find it for around $200.

The Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT has 50mm dynamic drivers with a frequency response of 20 - 40,000 Hz — much wider than the average gaming headset, which usually sticks to the "human hearing" standard of 20 - 20,000 Hz. It has round over-ear earcups with a light aluminum finish, and a padded, leatherette-covered headband that matches the earpads. It comes with a removable omnidirectional microphone, which isn't quite as convenient as SteelSeries' retractable mic, but still works well enough for those who want to use the headset as a pair of headphones without a visible microphone permanently attached.

The Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT's battery lasts just 15 hours (when connected to two devices), which means you'll probably need to recharge daily. This shouldn't be too much of an inconvenience if you're only using the headset at your PC, but there are better options to take on the road. If you don't need the added Bluetooth connectivity, Corsair's Virtuoso RGB Wireless SE has the same features (minus Bluetooth).

Read: Corsair Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT 

Most Comfortable Wireless Gaming Headset

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Most Comfortable Wireless Gaming Headset

Specifications

Driver: 53mm dynamic
Impedance: 64 Ohms
Frequency response: 10-21,000 Hz
Mic: Electret condenser, uni-directional, noise-canceling
Connectivity: 2.4GHz wireless
Weight: 11.64oz / 330g 12.06oz / 342g (with mic)

Reasons to buy

+
Very comfortable
+
Looks good
+
Excellent battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Only connects via 2.4 GHz wireless
-
Virtual surround is underwhelming
-
A little pricey

The HyperX Cloud III Wireless might just be the most comfortable wireless headset we've ever worn — and it's exactly as comfortable as its wired counterpart (the HyperX Cloud III). The Cloud III Wireless is an over-ear headset with a padded, leatherette-covered headband and soft, leatherette-covered earpads. It weighs 11.64oz (330g), which is close to what the Arctis Nova Pro weighs.

The Cloud III Wireless has the same 53mm dynamic drivers as the Cloud II Wireless, but they've been redesigned and angled for a better audio experience. The drivers have a frequency response of 10 - 21,000 Hz, which is a little wider than the average gaming headset but not as wide as the Arctis Nova Pro or the Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT. It comes with a detachable 10mm boom microphone, which has an internal pop filter and a red mute indicator light.

The headset gets an impressive 120 hours of battery life, which is more than just about any wireless gaming headset you'll find (except for the HyperX Cloud Alpha Wireless, which gets a whopping 300+ hours). The downside is that this headset only offers one connectivity option, which is 2.4GHz wireless — no analog/wired connection, no Bluetooth, nothing. In other words, it's a great headset so long as you only plan on using it with one device.

Read: HyperX Cloud III Wireless Review 

Best Wireless Gaming Headset for Audiophiles

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Best Wireless Gaming Headset for Audiophiles

Specifications

Driver: 90mm Planar Magnetic
Impedance: Ohms
Frequency response: 10 - 50,000 Hz
Mic: Detachable boom mic, built-in beamforming array
Connectivity: 2.4GHz wireless, Bluetooth, AUX
Weight: 17.28 ounces / 490g

Reasons to buy

+
Sounds incredible
+
80+ hour battery life
+
Impressive wireless range
+
Good AI noise suppression on mic
+
Surprisingly comfortable

Reasons to avoid

-
Big and heavy
-
Can’t manually switch between 2.4GHz wireless and BT
-
Boom mic is finicky and built-in mics are not great
-
EQ only on mobile

The Audeze Maxwell is a large, over-ear headset with a steel and aluminum frame and Audeze's newly-designed 90mm planar magnetic drivers. It's larger and heftier than most gaming headsets, weighing in at a whopping 17.28 ounces (490g) — it's still surprisingly comfortable, however.

The Maxwell's 90mm planar magnetic drivers have a wide frequency response range of 10 - 50,000 Hz, and the headset has an impressively wide and detailed soundstage. The Maxwell is tuned by default for gaming, but music also sounds fantastic once you've adjusted the EQ slightly. The headset comes with a detachable boom mic, but it also has built-in mics in the earcups — they're not great, but they're convenient if you need to take a call and you don't have the detachable mic with you.

The Maxwell offers both 2.4GHz wireless and Bluetooth connectivity, but does not mix audio from both sources and — much to our annoyance — switches between sources automatically (prioritizing Bluetooth). This was our main source of frustration with this headset — otherwise, it's fantastic, with 80+ hours of battery life, solid connectivity, and audiophile sound quality.

Read: Audeze Maxwell Review 

Best Wireless Gaming Headset Mic

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Best Wireless Gaming Headset Mic

Specifications

Driver: 50mm Dynamic
Impedance: 32 Ohms
Frequency response: 12 - 28,000 Hz
Mic: Razer HyperClear Super Wideband
Connectivity: 2.4GHz wireless, Bluetooth 5.2
Weight: 11.29oz / 320g

Reasons to buy

+
Great microphone
+
Very comfortable
+
70 hour battery life
+
Competitive esports EQ profiles

Reasons to avoid

-
No simultaneous audio from Bluetooth/2.4GHz wireless
-
Yokes seem flimsy despite being reinforced
-
No analog connection

While we always recommend a standalone gaming microphone for sounding your best, Razer's newest BlackShark V2 Pro (2023) headset has the best-sounding mic we've heard on a gaming headset.

The BlackShark V2 Pro (2023) is the 2023 update to the BlackShark V2 Pro, and it has roughly the same design and drivers — 50mm dynamic drivers with a frequency response range of 12 - 28,000 Hz as the original. Audio sounds good with Razer's EQ adjusted, if a little mid-range heavy. The headset's stainless steel sliders have been reinforced and its battery has been upgraded to offer an impressive 70+ hours.

The BlackShark V2 Pro (2023) has a new detachable boom mic: a 9.9mm condenser mic with a sampling rate of 32 kHz and an internal pop filter (plus an optional external pop filter). The mic made our voice sound full and broadcast-y, even without Razer's software-based EQ settings turned on. And, to quote a Tom's Hardware editor during one of our meetings, we sounded "better than we do in real life."

The BlackShark V2 Pro (2023) has both 2.4GHz wireless and Bluetooth connectivity — it can connect to both simultaneously, but does not mix audio from both sources so you'll need to switch between the two.

Read: Razer BlackShark V2 Pro (2023) Review

Best Lifestyle Wireless Gaming Headset

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Best Lifestyle Wireless Gaming Headset

Specifications

Driver: 50mm custom drivers
Impedance: 32 Ohms
Frequency response: 20 - 20,000 Hz
Mic: Dual integrated beamforming noise canceling
Connectivity: (Simultaneous) Wireless 2.4 GHz and Bluetooth 5.2
Weight: 12oz / 340g

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent audio and comfort
+
Nice rigid case included
+
Juggles multi-device audio well
+
Very good battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Bland, smudge-prone plastic design
-
No retractable/removable mic
-
No analog mode

The Razer Barracuda Pro Wireless looks more like a lifestyle headset from Sony or Bose than it does a gaming peripheral from Razer. Featuring a surprisingly understated (for Razer) all-black design, built-in beamforming mics, and a sturdy travel case, the Barracuda Pro Wireless is a good option for anyone who wants a headset that can pull double-duty.

The Barracuda Pro Wireless is comfortable and lightweight, with a minimal all-plastic design. It has Razer's custom 50mm dynamic drivers, which have a frequency response range of 20 - 20,000 Hz, and a pair of integrated beamforming noise-canceling mics in the earcups. They're not the best mics we've ever seen in a headset, but they do a good enough job of picking up your voice and keeping background noise low — they should be fine for most gamers.

On the lifestyle side, the Barracuda Pro Wireless has three levels of active noise cancellation and up to 40 hours of battery life. It offers both 2.4GHz wireless and Bluetooth connectivity, but does not mix audio from multiple sources (like the Arctis Nova Pro and Virtuoso RGB Wireless XT do) — instead, you'll need to switch between sources using a dedicated "SmartSwitch" button on the right earcup.

The main drawback to the Barracuda Pro Wireless is its somewhat less-than-premium build — the plastic looks a little cheap and attracts fingerprints. But it's fairly lightweight, at 11.99 ounces (340g), and comes with a nice rigid travel case.

Read: Razer Barracuda Pro Wireless Review

Quick Gaming Headset Shopping Tips

Quick Gaming Headset Shopping Tips

Here are some things to keep in mind when searching for the perfect wireless gaming headset:

  • 2.4 GHz Wireless or Bluetooth: Wireless headsets have come a long way, but latency will always be a concern. For gamers, a low-latency 2.4GHz wireless connection is a must for high-quality, lag-free audio. If you're thinking of using your headset away from your PC, you'll want to look for something that also has Bluetooth for connecting to multiple devices dongle-free. Premium headsets usually provide both options, and several even allow you to connect to both sources simultaneously and mix the incoming audio.
  • What kind of mic: A cardioid or supercardioid mic would be appropriate for a gaming headset + microphone combo. A headset with a microphone attached should utilize a pickup pattern that focuses on the sounds in front of it while drowning out noises coming from either side. This much will suffice to talk to folks in party chats over a console. Also, make sure the headset has an on-ear mute button and an easy way to tell if the mic is muted — it's much easier to accidentally walk into the bathroom wearing a wireless headset and forget you're still broadcasting.

    That said, you’ll never get pristine audio from a headset mic — if you're streaming or podcasting, you may want to look into the best desktop microphones.
  • Is rechargeability important: Rechargeability is crucial, and it's important to know whether your wireless headset can charge while in use and how long the device will last under a full charge. Typically, a headset will last between 20-30 hours between charges, so anything around and over that range is ideal. A benefit for a wireless headset is also the option to use it wired, just in case the battery is about to die mid-game or mid-stream. There are also headsets that utilize a swappable battery system, where one rechargeable battery powers the headset and the other charges in the base station.
  • Headband and earcups: You can compare and contrast specs all day, but your headset has to be comfortable to wear. It should go without saying that anything made with cheap material like plastic shouldn’t be given the time of day. Plush memory foam, velour, leatherette, and knitted fabric are much more comfortable on the ear. And don’t forget about the headband — it should feel durable and be comfortably padded. If you can’t wear the headset before purchasing, be sure to look into how many points of adjustment it has. 

Discounts on the Best Wireless Headets

Whether you're shopping for one of the best wireless headsets that we listed above or a similar model, you may find savings by checking out our lists of best Razer promo codes, best Corsair coupon codes and best Newegg promo codes.

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Sarah Jacobsson Purewal
Senior Editor, Peripherals

Sarah Jacobsson Purewal is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware covering peripherals, software, and custom builds. You can find more of her work in PCWorld, Macworld, TechHive, CNET, Gizmodo, Tom's Guide, PC Gamer, Men's Health, Men's Fitness, SHAPE, Cosmopolitan, and just about everywhere else.

With contributions from
  • trevor_chdwck
    Admin said:
    From Bluetooth connectivity to premium leather comfort, here are the best wireless headsets for gamers, creators, and professionals alike.

    Best Wireless Headsets 2022: Bluetooth, Budget, and More : Read more
    I bought the Corsair Virtuoso per your recommendation and had to return it within a week. Corsair put the stitching of the headset fabric on the under-side of the headset, directly digging into your head. This headset is a miserable experience for any time over an hour. That's even after adding an aftermarket head cushion and even at one point, an old-maid card. I wanted to love this headset, but the head-band design has a truly fatal flaw. I returned it and got the SteelSeries Arctis 7. It was recommended by multiple friends and the headband design is definitely more comfortable while still retaining the excellent audio. I can't understand why it (arctis 7), or it's updated sibling, the arctis 7 plus, isn't on this list.
    Reply
  • kyzarvs
    Do you ever review any of the pro stuff and compare to gaming kit?
    For example, I've use Plantronics BlackWire headsets for 9+ years now. I find as they are professional grade (call centres etc), they tend to be very high quality, very comfortable and have stable/mature app support. My current BT600 I've had for about 5 years, battery life is still excellent (multiple days), 2x wireless connections for simultaneous connections to phone & PC, NC microphone with mute button and it's been everywhere for work (car, onsite and home desk) and for gaming as well. Not as flash looking as gaming stuff f'sure, but well worth a look. My fave headset are my QC45 Bose, but that's soley as I fly a lot and the NC is astonishingly good on them. The mic in particular is nowhere near the Plantronics and they do take several hours of bedding in before they stop sounding over-harsh on the treble.
    Reply
  • Friesiansam
    Why is the Corsair Virtuoso RGB Wireless SE singled out for criticism because "Wireless range depends on house construction "?

    In case you haven't noticed, all wireless headsets will be similarly affected, just like other wireless devices.
    Reply
  • drivinfast247
    I thoroughly enjoy my Virtuoso Wireless SE for gaming.
    Reply