Logitech Lift Review: Unconventional Design, Great Ergonomics

It’s only ergonomic if it fits your hand.

Logitech Lift
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

Tom's Hardware Verdict

The Logitech Lift is an awesome ergonomic productivity mouse for right- and left-handed productivity users with smaller hands. It’s comfortable, intuitive, and comes packed with Logitech’s advanced productivity features.

Pros

  • +

    Comfortable, made for small/medium hands

  • +

    Left-handed option

  • +

    Quiet

  • +

    Advanced productivity features such as per-app profiles and Logitech Flow

Cons

  • -

    AA battery

  • -

    DPI button unusable

  • -

    Not for larger hands

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Looking for an ergonomic productivity mouse? You’ve probably noticed there aren’t a ton of options out there, especially in the premium range. 

That’s why the new Logitech Lift vertical mouse is pretty exciting. It’s a new sibling for Logitech’s MX Vertical mouse — which was already our gold standard for ergonomic productivity mice — for an entirely new audience. The Lift is smaller and lighter than the MX Vertical — it’s specifically designed for users with small- to medium-sized hands. It also has quieter, more intuitive-placed buttons, is available  in multiple color combos and it comes in a left-hand version (surprisingly rare considering how not ambidextrous vertical mice are). 

If the MX Vertical is your ride-or-die and you have large hands, the Lift may not be the mouse for you — it’s not a direct replacement. But if the MX Vertical is just a little too big or chunky or right-handed, the Lift might be the best wireless mouse for you. 

The Lift costs $69.99 and comes in rose (pink and pale pink), graphite (black and gray), and pale gray (off-white and white). Unfortunately, the left-hand version comes in graphite only. 

Specifications

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Sensor Model Logitech Advanced Optical Tracking
Max Sensitivity4,000 DPI
Programmable Buttons6
LED ZonesNone
ConnectivityBluetooth, Logi Bolt USB dongle
Measurements (LxWxH)4.25 x 2.7 x 2.8 (108mm x 70mm x 71mm)
Weight 125g
Price$69.99

Design and Comfort of Logitech Lift

The Logitech Lift is a vertical mouse, which means it’s tilted on its side instead of flat like a standard mouse. It’s not completely vertical; the Lift rests at an “optimal” 57-degree angle, which is a more natural angle than completely horizontal or vertical.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Lift’s vertical design is meant to put your hand, wrist, and forearm in a more ergonomic position, take pressure off the transverse carpal ligament and reduce muscle movement in general. Whether this translates to maximum comfort will still depend on the individual, though. I didn’t find the mouse’s position to be any more or less comfortable than my regular mouse, but my husband, who has undergone multiple hand and wrist surgeries, said there was “no question” that the Lift felt better.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Lift is housed in a matte plastic casing and has a soft, rubbery grip where your palm will sit. It has six buttons, four on the finger side (left-click, right-click, a clickable scroll wheel, and a small button under the scroll wheel that switches DPI) and two on the thumb side. All of the buttons except for the button under the scroll wheel are comfortable to use; the DPI button is in an awkward place and is definitely not something I’d want to be clicking more than very occasionally. The scroll wheel button, DPI button and the two thumb buttons are programmable.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The bottom of the mouse has an on/off switch and a button that switches profiles (you can connect the Lift to up to three computers at once). There’s also a removable panel, under which you’ll find the battery (1x AA) and a USB dongle.

Performance of Logitech Lift

I thought it would take longer to get used to the Lift’s vertical design, but the Lift was so comfortable and intuitively designed that I felt at ease the second I started using it. However, this may not be the case for all users, as the Lift is specifically designed for people with small- to medium-sized hands.

According to Logitech’s size guide, my hands are on the larger side of medium, and the Lift feels great, although the tips of my fingers extend slightly past the Lift’s left and right mouse buttons. My husband’s hands are much larger than mine and his fingertips aren’t anywhere near the buttons when the Lift is in his palm. Fit is everything with a mouse like this, so my husband will have to stick with the MX Vertical.

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Feeling at ease is one thing, but getting used to a vertical mouse for more precise movements — such as gaming or Photoshop, where pixel-perfect accuracy counts — is a different story. Like other vertical mice, the Lift brings your hand up slightly higher. This is more ergonomic, but it makes it harder to accurately control the mouse’s sensor — and it’s something I wasn’t even slightly closer to getting used to after a week and a half of testing.

I was especially impressed with how well-placed most of the Lift’s buttons (minus the DPI button) were. The buttons offer a small amount of tactile feedback — it’s not a lot, and I generally prefer a little more, but it does make for extremely quiet clicking, so it will work well in an office setting. Still, if you’re used to clickier mice, you’ll probably find the Lift’s switches a little mushy. The DPI button offers no tactile feedback at all, pretty much solidifying its status as a button I would never use.

Software: Logi Options+

The Lift pairs with Logitech’s Logi Options+, the still-in-beta successor to Logitech Options. You don’t need Logi Options+ to use the Lift, but you do need it if you want to customize the Lift, see the mouse’s remaining battery life, and unlock its advanced productivity features.

The Lift’s battery life is displayed as a percentage, much more precise than the MX Vertical’s bars. (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

You can use Logi Options+ to set pointer speed (by percentage, not DPI) and customize the Lift’s four programmable buttons. Options+’s button remapping capabilities are pretty advanced — not only can you choose from a wealth of options (mostly productivity-oriented) for each button, but you can also set up customized profiles for different apps. When I first opened Options+, it even offered to install and set up pre-made profiles for several common apps. However, when I tried this, several of the profiles didn’t download properly and therefore didn’t work.

Logi Options+ also lets you see what devices are currently paired with the Lift. (Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Logi Options+ is also where you can set up Logitech Flow, a neat productivity feature that lets you jump between up to three different PCs, even copying and pasting content from one to another. This feature is pretty useful for people who use more than one device (like me), even if it takes a moment to move between devices.

Battery Life

Unlike the MX Vertical, which has a rechargeable battery, the Lift is powered by a single AA battery, which Logitech claims lasts for up to 24 months. Obviously, this will depend on how you use the Lift. I’ve been using the Lift pretty regularly for about a week and a half, and I haven’t turned it off at all, and battery life is down to 95 percent.

I personally don’t mind peripherals with non-rechargeable batteries, especially if it means serious gains in battery life. But it’s a little surprising to see a non-rechargeable battery in a premium productivity mouse, especially when the MX Vertical has a rechargeable battery with a decent (up to four months) lifespan.

Bottom Line

If you’ve got small- to medium-sized hands and are looking for a vertical mouse, the Logitech Lift is an excellent option. The Lift is lightweight, comfortable, intuitive, and packed with high-end productivity features.

But, like most ergonomic peripherals, the Lift is perfect for some people…and not so much for others. The Lift is designed for people with smaller hands; if you have large hands or long fingers, you’ll probably be better off with the Logitech MX Vertical. And while the Lift performs well in a general office setting, anyone who needs an exacting degree of accuracy from their mouse will probably have trouble getting used to the Lift’s vertical design and silent-but-mushy buttons.

Sarah Jacobsson Purewal
Senior Editor, Peripherals

Sarah Jacobsson Purewal is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware covering peripherals, software, and custom builds. You can find more of her work in PCWorld, Macworld, TechHive, CNET, Gizmodo, Tom's Guide, PC Gamer, Men's Health, Men's Fitness, SHAPE, Cosmopolitan, and just about everywhere else.

  • eye4bear
    I have become a lifelong Logi person. After trying out several other brands, including some from Microsoft, none are anywhere close to mice from Logi. I have a M-705 that has to be well over 10 years old that still works the same as it did on day one. My daily driver mouse at home is a newer almost silent model, LOVE it. I have only one gripe with Logi, they never get around to porting their software to Linux. While completely usable on Linux, we do not get any of the custom features. Logi, if you read this, please put your software in Flathub as a Flatpak!
    Also, I for one, do not want a rechargeable mouse. The single AA battery lasts for about 6 months and if it dies, I can just pop in a new one and off I go, no need to wait for it to charge.
    Reply
  • drajitsh
    "According to Logitech’s size guide, my hands are on the larger side of medium" after reading this i immediately went to the Logitech site and could not find any size guide. I asked for support and they said that they do not have a size guide. They however insist that this mouse is for small and medium hands.
    The question is what constitutes a small medium or large hand?
    It would help if someone could express hand sizes in a standardized manner -- say according to surgical glove size.
    You do not say that this shoe is for a medium sized foot. You say that it fits size 38 US( as an example)
    Reply
  • dimar
    Went through like 5 gaming and regular Logitech mice, and all ended up having left double click issue, even the ones I received from warranty service. So far Razer works well for me. I don't think I'm going with Logitech until they publicly acknowledge and take care of this issue.
    Reply
  • JTWrenn
    Would be nice if they made an MMO mouse with this type of config. I feel like we are quickly creating a whole generation of people with wrist and arm issues.
    Reply
  • domih
    Due to pain in my right hand palm I switched to a vertical mouse 5 years ago. It totally solved my problem. I recommend the Anker model for right handed people, it's less than half the price compared to the Logitech Lift and is AOK :-) For left handed people there is the same model as Anker under another brand name. Both can be found on Amazon or other stores. Larger hands fit them perfectly.
    Reply
  • bobba84
    Oh man, 1998 called and wants it's confused iron back.
    Reply
  • BenjaminusIV
    drajitsh said:
    "According to Logitech’s size guide, my hands are on the larger side of medium" after reading this i immediately went to the Logitech site and could not find any size guide. I asked for support and they said that they do not have a size guide. They however insist that this mouse is for small and medium hands.
    The question is what constitutes a small medium or large hand?
    It would help if someone could express hand sizes in a standardized manner -- say according to surgical glove size.
    You do not say that this shoe is for a medium sized foot. You say that it fits size 38 US( as an example)
    https://resource.logitech.com/w_1800,h_1800,c_limit,q_auto,f_auto,dpr_1.0/d_transparent.gif/content/dam/logitech/en/products/mice/lift-vertical-ergonomic-mouse/sizing-guide/sizing-guide-desktop.png?v=1
    SMALL(< 17,5 cm)
    (< 6,9 inches)
    Less than 3 credit cards
    MEDIUM(17,5 – 19,0 cm)
    (6,9 – 7,5 inches)
    Just about 3 credit cards
    LARGE(> 19,0 cm)
    (> 7,5 inches)
    3.5 credit cards or more
    Reply
  • Friesiansam
    I've been using vertical mice for several years, due to the effects of old cycling injuries. I think we are long overdue for a proper gaming vertical mouse.

    This Logitech mouse is not for me due to it's small size, however, I use an Evoluent vertical mouse. They are available in right and left handed versions and, in 3 different sizes. My present one is an Evoluent Vertical Mouse D wireless, in the largest size because I have big hands with long fingers (25cm span). I still miss the instant response of my old Func ms3...
    Reply
  • Findecanor
    I use vertical mice, but I don't prefer mice that fit my hand too well so that I can only move it by moving the entire forearm.
    The MX Vertical is one of those. If the size of the Lift is reduced enough, I might like it more.

    BTW. I also wish they had reduced the weight a bit more. Only 10g less than the MX Vertical, and that one is a tank at 135g.
    Reply
  • drajitsh
    dimar said:
    Went through like 5 gaming and regular Logitech mice, and all ended up having left double click issue, even the ones I received from warranty service. So far Razer works well for me. I don't think I'm going with Logitech until they publicly acknowledge and take care of this issue.
    Hmmm i had this problem too.
    Reply