Universal Laptop Power Adapters For The Air, Road, And Wall

Duracell 90 W Universal AC/Auto/Air Adapter

Duracell is now a registered trademark of Procter & Gamble. While Duracell is branded on this adapter, this is not a Duracell product per se. It is actually manufactured under license by Battery-Biz. The company supplies the majority of Duracell's product-specific batteries and power products, such as car inverters. If your product has "Duracell" plastered on it, but it isn't a watch, AAA, AA, C, D, or 9 V battery, there's a good chance Battery-Biz makes it.

This charging kit covers the three basic modes of travel: the air, in a car, and when you have an AC outlet handy. It also happens to be one of two universal adapters sold under the Duracell brand. Covering that trio of bases costs about $90, which is about $20 more than the 90 W model with the cigarette lighter receptacle plug on its own. There's also a 40 W adapter, but that's specifically for netbooks.

The adapter includes Velcro strips for cable management, but you're going to end up with a corded mess one way or the other. The cables that connect to the power adapters aren't angled, making them difficult to pack away. And although this is one of the few adapters that actually includes  an EmPower plug, there is a very faint high-frequency squeal that emanates from the adapter when it's used with certain 16 V notebooks.

While Duracell backs this up with a three-year warranty, nobody likes dealing with the RMA process for silly manufacturing deficiencies. The problem seems to disappear when we use the adapter with 19 V notebooks, so the problem could be related to the sense resistors responsible for lowering the voltage.

Create a new thread in the US Reviews comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
17 comments
    Your comment
  • I actually thought they are going to release a standard for all the Laptop Power Adapters, one power adapter for all the notebooks. (only might be different wattages)
    0
  • I can not honestly tell you the number of friends, customers, and others that bought a non-dell power adapter for a dell unit, and found out that it will run the unit, with reduced performance, but will not charge. and paid lots of money. I keep a collection of actual dell power supplies 65w, 90w, 120w ,just to help out when that happens. funny thing , if you shop around you can get the real ones for less than the kingston, etc "universal"!
    -1
  • It's a shame that there is no single International standard to go by. It would make things a lot simpler.
    0
  • And even worse than that- between my daughter and I we've owned 3 Dell laptops, and each one uses a different power adapter and plug.
    0
  • cadderAnd even worse than that- between my daughter and I we've owned 3 Dell laptops, and each one uses a different power adapter and plug.


    That seems unusual. In my house we have 3 different laptops spanning 6 year purchase dates and they all have the exact same plug. Two of the laptops are Latitudes and the other is a Studio XPS. The only difference is that the Studio XPS came with a 130 watt adapter as opposed to 65 watt adapters for the Latitudes. So no gaming with that machine while plugged into the 65 watt adapters.
    -1
  • shreeharshaI actually thought they are going to release a standard for all the Laptop Power Adapters, one power adapter for all the notebooks. (only might be different wattages)


    Actually this sort of standard DOES exist in Europe for smart phones and cell phones, I'm not sure if it includes laptop or netbooks but it might. I'll have to search around.

    It seems the bottom line today is buy the OEM adapters if you want to play it safe.
    1
  • thats another lame article consecutively.
    come on Toms, get the BD benchies out already.
    -1
  • This is exactly why I don't understand dropping serious money into a laptop. Have a good desktop, and a cheap laptop/netbook/smartphone/tablet for your portable needs. Batteries only last 2-4 years with consistent use, so after 2-3 years you need a $150 battery, plus if your power brick is worn out then it is another $120 for that...
    So that $800 laptop then requires another $270 to run after 3 years? And this is assuming you don't drop the thing, or break it through normal wear and tear. And laptops do not age as gracefully as desktops because they are generally crap hardware to begin with. Much better to stick with a $300 laptop, and a decent desktop. The desktop will keep up with the times longer and will have less maintenance, while the laptop can be swapped out when need be.
    1
  • only quake 2.
    0
  • My Toshiba Satellit Pro M30 is over 5 years old now and it still works fine. HDD and RAM has been upgraded. The battery went flat a long time ago and won't recharge.
    Instead of buying a new Lithium-Ion batt (that would only last about another 2 years anyway), I just use a 12V 7.2Ah Lead Acid connected to the PSU input when I don't have access to a mains supply for an extended period (e.g. on long train journey).

    It works cos the PSU output voltage is 15V so 12V is close enough.
    -1
  • Rosewill makes some very good laptop bricks.
    -1
  • the problem always created by U.S.A. they like to twist the ISOs upside down. for example, metric system, kilometer become miles, centimeter become inches, kilogram become pound, standard road direction is left,they changed to right. wall socket pin, voltage. etc. and today, they corrupted world financial system, caused loss of multi billion to several region. if they follow the a-long-lone time ISOs, it will be easier to everyone in this world.

    cheers!
    0
  • @Cybersans. The United States customary system of measurement is based on imperial units, which were used in the British Empire. Most intelligent people in the world, that have studied at least some history, understand that the United States of America was born from 13 British Colonies. That being said, many customs that are still used in the US today were born from our British Heritage like for instance the mile and the ENGLISH LANGUAGE!! Most of us, who celebrate that heritage, also feel a requirement to come to the aid of the nation in which fathered our own in say, ‘times of crises’ which is another history lesson. Also, since most of the technology that is discussed on this website was created in our country, it is only customary that the technology gets measured in its country of origin not matter how convoluted it may be. Cheers!
    -1
  • legacy7955Actually this sort of standard DOES exist in Europe for smart phones and cell phones, I'm not sure if it includes laptop or netbooks but it might. I'll have to search around. It seems the bottom line today is buy the OEM adapters if you want to play it safe.

    Phones and GPS devices take less current to charge than notebook batteries. These devices are moving from proprietary chargers to charging via USB. I haven't met a notebook computer yet that could charge off the low USB currents, even if the 5V supply could be pushed up to 12V.
    0
  • Quote:
    he battery in the notebook largely regulates the trickle charge, even when it's topping off from a constant current/constant voltage charging scheme.

    I hope that that is so; it certainly wasn't the last time that I looked at this in detail. At that time, just putting 15V across the charging terminals of the battery and going to sleep would ruin the battery; there was all kinds of logic in the charger to protect the battery.

    Have they really built this into the batter now, so that all we have to do is provide a DC source with the right voltage and no other control circuitry?
    0
  • i don't think this new product will give fruitful solutation
    0
  • i think this price is too expensive, $80 in
    0