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Corsair SF600 Platinum PSU Review: Setting The SFX Performance Bar Higher

Editor's Choice

Transient Response Tests

Advanced Transient Response Tests

For details on our transient response testing, please click here.

Ιn these tests, we monitor the SF600's response in several scenarios. First, a transient load (10A at +12V, 5A at 5V, 5A at 3.3V, and 0.5A at 5VSB) is applied for 200ms as the PSU works at 20 percent load. In the second scenario, it's hit by the same transient load while operating at 50 percent load.

In the next sets of tests, we increase the transient load on the major rails with a new configuration: 15A at +12V, 6A at 5V, 6A at 3.3V, and 0.5A at 5VSB. We also increase the load-changing repetition rate from 5 Hz (200ms) to 50 Hz (20ms). Again, this runs with the PSU operating at 20 and 50 percent load.

The last tests are even tougher. Although we keep the same loads, the load-changing repetition rate rises to 1 kHz (1ms).

In all of the tests, we use an oscilloscope to measure the voltage drops caused by the transient load. The voltages should remain within the ATX specification's regulation limits.

These tests are crucial because they simulate the transient loads a PSU is likely to handle (such as booting a RAID array or an instant 100 percent load of CPU/GPUs). We call these "Advanced Transient Response Tests," and they are designed to be very tough to master, especially for a PSU with a capacity of less than 500W.  

We should note that the ATX spec requires for capacitive loading during the transient rests, but in our methodology we chose to apply the worst case scenario with no extra capacitance on the rails. 

Advanced Transient Response at 20 Percent – 200ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.184V12.047V1.12%Pass
5V5.074V4.985V1.75%Pass
3.3V3.377V3.293V2.49%Pass
5VSB5.029V4.985V0.87%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 20 Percent – 20ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.184V12.019V1.35%Pass
5V5.073V4.969V2.05%Pass
3.3V3.377V3.276V2.99%Pass
5VSB5.029V4.991V0.76%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 20 Percent – 1ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.183V12.023V1.31%Pass
5V5.073V4.969V2.05%Pass
3.3V3.376V3.278V2.90%Pass
5VSB5.029V4.993V0.72%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50 Percent – 200ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.177V12.043V1.10%Pass
5V5.072V4.978V1.85%Pass
3.3V3.374V3.285V2.64%Pass
5VSB5.015V4.973V0.84%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50 Percent – 20ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.175V11.952V1.83%Pass
5V5.071V4.962V2.15%Pass
3.3V3.373V3.267V3.14%Pass
5VSB5.015V4.976V0.78%Pass

Advanced Transient Response at 50 Percent – 1ms

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.175V12.021V1.26%Pass
5V5.070V4.960V2.17%Pass
3.3V3.373V3.268V3.11%Pass
5VSB5.015V4.976V0.78%Pass

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This is the only discipline where Corsair's SF600 Gold performs better than the Platinum model. Apparently you cannot achieve higher efficiency and tighter voltage regulation without making some compromises. Unfortunately for the SF600 Platinum, a PSU's transient response behavior is immensely important since it depicts performance under real-world conditions where there aren't steady loads.

Here are the oscilloscope screenshots we took during Advanced Transient Response Testing:

Transient Response At 20 Percent Load – 200ms

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Transient Response At 20 Percent Load – 20ms

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Transient Response At 20 Percent Load – 1ms

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Transient Response At 50 Percent Load – 200ms

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Transient Response At 50 Percent Load – 20ms

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Transient Response At 50 Percent Load – 1ms

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Turn-On Transient Tests

In the next set of tests, we measure the SF600’s response in simpler transient load scenarios—during its power-on phase.

For our first measurement, we turn the power supply off, dial in the maximum current the 5VSB rail can handle, and switch the PSU back on. In the second test, we set the +12V rail's maximum load and start the PSU while it is in standby mode. In the last test, with the PSU switched completely off, we dial in the +12V rail's maximum load before restoring power. The ATX specification states that recorded spikes on all rails should not exceed 10 percent of their nominal values (+10 percent for 12V is 13.2V, and 5.5V for 5V).

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We record good results with smooth waveforms, no notable voltage overshoots, and no voltage spikes.

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  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Great review ARIS , I run the SF600 GOLD in my inwin case setup.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    Less than 1% efficiency difference between Gold and Platinum ? Hard to make that pay under any normal use scenario.

    Glad to see that they made several other improvements for the Platinum model.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    I don't see the load chart.
    Reply
  • iankphone
    I just completed my ncase-m1 build with this. It's really good.

    8700K, 2080Ti. Like a boss. I'm not overclocking however (insufficient cooling for that).
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    Just wait now for the SF750 to get reviewed :)
    Reply
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    21685936 said:
    Just wait now for the SF750 to get reviewed :)

    Looking forward to it. I will most likely get one for my next setup.
    Reply
  • smitty2k1
    Did you test the SF600 platinum with Vega graphics cards? I'm getting the OCP to trip on my just running the Vega 56 in turbo mode. The same thing was happening with my older Silverstone SX-650G power supply, and Silverstone confirmed that they had made an engineering change to fix the OCP tripping.

    It only happens in Destiny 2, no other games. I'm curious if this is a widespread issue, or something else with my system. It seems the Vega cards are tough on PSUs.
    Reply