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Intel Core i7-9700K Binned At 5.1GHz On Sale for $570

Despite the ongoing 14nm processor shortage and lack of stock for Intel's 9th generation processors, Silicon Lottery got its hands on a few Intel Core i7-9700K chips. The newly binned processors are available at different clock speeds and have gone up for sale on the company's website.

(Image credit: Silicon Lottery)

The highest-clocked Intel Core i7-9700K runs at 5.1GHz across all cores with a voltage of 1.362V and the AVX offset set at 2. This little gem is priced at $569.99, as it takes a lot of work and time to find a good sample. According to Silicon Lottery, only 28 percent of the Intel Core i7-9700K processors tested can achieve a clock speed of 5.1GHz or greater.

Two other slightly lower-binned Intel Core i7-9700K parts are also on sale. The chip clocked at 5GHz with 1.350V has an asking price of $479.99, while the 4.9GHz one operates at 1.337V and goes for $449.99. As usual, both processors have an AVX offset of 2.

Silicon Lottery has gone to great lengths to ensure that its processors work flawlessly on its customers' systems. The company does all its testing using consumer-grade components, in terms of cooling solution, thermal compound, motherboard and memory. The details can be found on the Silicon Lottery's qualified vendor list for the Coffee Lake Refresh processors.

Additionally, the company also offers an optional delidding service for Intel 9th generation chips for $49.99. The company noted, peak core temperatures for the Intel 9th generation processors can decrease by 4 to 8 degrees Celsius under heavy workloads. Customers who opt for the delidding treatment might have to wait up to one business day, depending on the state of Silicon Lottery's pre-delidded inventory.

All processors sold on Silicon Lottery are covered by a one-year warranty and are eligible for a one-time replacement if any defects or malfunctions were to develop during this period. Silicon Lottery has a 14-day return policy in place for customers that are not satisfied with their purchase.

  • redgarl
    Cmon, this is ridiculous, 200 MHz for 120$. This is the kind of stuff that makes me despise Intel.
    Reply
  • shrapnel_indie
    21441673 said:
    Cmon, this is ridiculous, 200 MHz for 120$. This is the kind of stuff that makes me despise Intel.

    You also need to look at Silicon Lottery for the pricing on these.
    Reply
  • salgado18
    21441673 said:
    Cmon, this is ridiculous, 200 MHz for 120$. This is the kind of stuff that makes me despise Intel.

    Also, Ryzen is a much better value.

    But some people want that 1% faster, because yes. For this niche market, Sillicon Lottery (not Intel) has a product, for a price.

    I think they made more sense when the stock Intels had lower clocks because of lack of competition.
    Reply
  • faalin
    21441673 said:
    Cmon, this is ridiculous, 200 MHz for 120$. This is the kind of stuff that makes me despise Intel.

    Its not Intel that is setting this price point, its Silicon Lottery. Basically they're buying 100's of 9700k's overclocking them and then selling them as a proven processor to run at a certain speed and voltage. You're paying for a premium service to guarantee a speed on a CPU.

    So you can buy a 9700k for $410 on amazon and hope it hits 5.1Ghz or pay $570 and know it will hit 5.1Ghz.
    Reply
  • abhinav chhetri
    This is crazy stupid . How about not using the silicone lottery as an excuse and just making good processor .
    Reply
  • shrapnel_indie
    21442224 said:
    This is crazy stupid . How about not using the silicone lottery as an excuse and just making good processor .

    It's a good CPU if it does its rated clock speed, and does what you need it to in a reasonable amount of time. Anything above that rated speed is silicon lottery as to how fast it will function... it depends on the process that makes them. Some turn out better than others. Intel, in this case (AMD in other cases, or those who make ARM processors,) already sorts them for the most part. As already stated, Silicon Lottery (the company) buys a bunch of them, tests them to see how much past base clock they can safely get them, thus binning them with a finer sifter. You pay for the service on top of the CPU itself. Is it crazy-stupid? Depends on your point of view... you can try to do it on your own, but the variances in the manufacturing process may only give you one that doesn't do well going much more than all-core turbo speeds allow.
    Reply
  • PapaCrazy
    Man, overclocking just keeps getting more expensive and boring. First they forced us onto expensive unlocked chips to do it. Then the mobos started to OC all on their own, taking away some of the fun. Then the chips themselves started to OC themselves, and took away the rest of the fun. And now just send a ton to money in the mail to Si Lottery, and they have all the fun!
    Reply
  • derekullo
    AMD has competitive pricing, but I'm patient enough to wait for the Intel Core i9 9900k Boxed Processor for $0.00 when it comes back in stock.


    (See top picture)
    Reply
  • jewie27
    For the price, might as well get a 9900k.
    Reply
  • 10tacle
    21441673 said:
    Cmon, this is ridiculous, 200 MHz for 120$. This is the kind of stuff that makes me despise Intel.

    1) We all know you hate Intel so there's that, but you are correct in that it is ridiculous.
    2) Pertaining to #1, nobody is forcing you to buy an Intel product.

    Anyway, this is an extreme example of diminished returns in increased performance vs. increased price. Game benchmarks will yield immeasurable results with that additional 200MHz, especially at higher than full HD resolutions, and even productivity benchmarks will yield essentially worthless improvement results. Only a clueless fool would spend 27% more on a CPU for only 4% more theoretical speed.
    Reply