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Graphics Card Prices: The Best GPU Deals

GPU Retail Availability
(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Graphics Cards Are Finally Back in Stock

The past 18 months have not been kind to any PC enthusiasts looking to upgrade their graphics cards. GPU prices on the best graphics cards have been terrible, with many cards peaking at over three times their official MSRP. But the long, dark night is coming to an end, as we knew it eventually must. There has been a steady downward trend in 2022 on GPU pricing, and we're now at the point where many graphics cards are actually in stock at prices relatively close to MSRP. In fact, there are even a few selling below MSRP.

As you might suspect, cards that had higher launch MSRPs are more readily available at MSRP, while those GPUs that had seemingly "too good to be true" prices are still marked up a bit. But paying slightly higher prices for a third-party factory overclocked card isn't exactly unusual, as those have usually been marked up about 10–20% over the base models.

We'll provide a rundown of all the latest generation graphics cards, with thoughts on the current price and performance on tap. Our GPU benchmarks provide the performance data for our discussion of overall value, and we'll list both online retail prices as well as the average eBay price over the past week — both of which are prone to fluctuation, so while the prices at the time of writing were correct, things will inevitably change. The previous-gen GPUs (i.e., Nvidia Turing and AMD RDNA) may also be worth considering if there are any decent deals, though that will mostly be via purchasing on eBay/used.

If you're looking for the best bang for the buck, we've ranked the various GPUs by FPS per dollar spent. There are even some AMD cards on sale for less than AMD's MSRP, and many AMD GPUs are basically being sold with prices starting at MSRP. It's a big change from just a few months ago.

The following represents a snapshot in time, which we've updated as of May 18, 2022. Prices are likely to drop even further unless something changes, though with rumors that Nvidia's Ada may appear as early as July, that may arrive before Team Green gets back to MSRP.

Overall Graphics Card Value Ranking

Here's the high-level overview, ranking all of the current and previous generation graphics cards based on the best prices currently available — that means eBay if the average price there is lower than the retail price, though retail pricing was used for many of the cards. Prices continue to change on a daily basis, and we periodically update this table if and when we notice any major swings in pricing.

We've sorted the following table based on the FPS per dollar spent, using the 1080p ultra performance. That will penalize cards that only have 4GB VRAM, but using 1080p medium would similarly penalize the faster GPUs since they cannot show their true grit at such low settings. Note that the links are to Amazon, which generally won't have the lowest price.

Graphics CardCurrent Price1080p Ultra FPS/$1080p Med FPS/$1440p Ultra FPS/$4K Ultra FPS/$
Radeon RX 6600*$3000.22230.39270.1538 
Radeon RX 6600 XT*$3720.20990.36700.1476 
Radeon RX 5500 XT 4GB*$1600.20920.4184  
Radeon RX 6650 XT*$4000.19970.34600.1419 
Radeon RX 6700 XT$4850.19740.32960.14590.0813
GeForce RTX 2060$2800.19710.34580.1383 
GeForce RTX 2080$4330.18980.30750.1441 
Radeon RX 5600 XT*$3130.18560.32130.1343 
GeForce RTX 3060$3800.18470.31260.1384 
Radeon RX 6750 XT*$5500.18400.30540.13710.0762
GeForce RTX 2070 Super$4240.18030.29280.1355 
Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB*$2220.17940.32690.1282 
GeForce RTX 2070$3800.17870.29130.1343 
GeForce GTX 1660$2270.17570.33060.1256 
GeForce GTX 1650 Super$1930.17200.35160.1190 
GeForce RTX 3070$5980.16680.26360.12960.0722
GeForce RTX 3060 Ti$5520.16580.27120.1262 
GeForce RTX 2080 Super$5130.16550.26870.12650.0673
GeForce GTX 1660 Ti$2680.16380.30540.1178 
GeForce RTX 3050$3150.16330.28380.1194 
GeForce RTX 2060 Super$4000.16270.26470.1206 
GeForce GTX 1660 Super$2740.16220.30230.1149 
Radeon RX 6800$6870.16120.25140.12740.0736
Radeon RX 6500 XT*$1930.15770.33910.0932 
Radeon RX 6800 XT$8000.15440.22380.12480.0732
Radeon RX 5700$4220.15360.26370.1117 
Radeon RX 5700 XT$4840.15230.26000.11010.0604
GeForce RTX 3070 Ti$7000.14870.23200.11790.0669
GeForce GTX 1650*$1800.14780.2841  
Radeon RX 6900 XT$9000.14410.20510.11720.0701
GeForce RTX 3080 12GB*$8700.14310.20490.11950.0762
GeForce RTX 3080$8500.13680.20400.11240.0713
GeForce RTX 2080 Ti$7100.13520.21360.10600.0628
Radeon RX 6950 XT*$1,1000.12480.17280.10490.0639
GeForce RTX 3080 Ti$1,1650.10590.15020.08870.0570
GeForce RTX 3090$1,5000.08440.11870.07100.0459
GeForce RTX 3090 Ti*$1,8000.07360.10010.06330.0421

* Factory overclocked card that may not fully represent 'typical' performance

AMD's "midrange" GPUs continue to dominate the top of the table, with the best Nvidia GPUs coming from the Turing generation and using eBay prices. The RX 6600 and RX 6600 XT take the top two spots, followed by the previous generation RX 5500 XT 4GB. Then we get the RX 6650 XT and the RX 6700 XT.

For Nvidia, the best deal on an Ampere GPU comes in the form of the RTX 3060, courtesy of this open box Asus card at Newegg. Brand new cards at Newegg tend to cost about $30 more, though they also typically have at least two fans. The 3060 lands in ninth place, just ahead of AMD's new RX 6750 XT. The next closest Ampere cards are in 16th or lower position with the RTX 3070 and RTX 3060 Ti.

The RTX 3090 Ti through RTX 3080, along with the RX 6950 XT and RX 6900 XT, all rank near the bottom of the chart due to their higher prices. You might be able to justify the RTX 3080 or above, or AMD's RX 6900 XT, but we'd steer clear of the RX 6950 XT and RTX 3080 Ti through RTX 3090 Ti. Also note that right now, the RTX 3080 12GB can be had for slightly less than the RTX 3080 10GB, an interesting twist that's probably not going to last.

Ultimately, only you can decide how much you're willing to spend and when you need to upgrade your graphics card. Budget-minded shoppers have largely been out of luck throughout the latter half of 2020 and all of 2021, and even now, it isn't easy to find truly good budget offerings. However, things are headed in the right direction once more, and if you've been sitting on an older GPU and hoping to upgrade without spending a fortune, you should soon have more than one or two options to choose between.

Now let's move on to the individual GPUs, looking just at the RTX 30- and RX-6000 series. We've sorted things based on performance, from high to low, with Nvidia first and AMD second.

Nvidia RTX 30-Series GPUs

GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Asus)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3090 Ti
$1,999 MSRP; $1,799 retail; $1,942 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3090 Ti

EVGA RTX 3090 Ti FTW3 Black Gaming at EVGA
Gigabyte RTX 3090 Ti Gaming at B&H Photo
MSI RTX 3090 Ti Gaming X Trio at Newegg

Even though it's the fastest graphics card currently available, the RTX 3090 Ti can be found below MSRP now, probably because it was overpriced to begin with. Overclocked models can push the price into the $2,100+ range, but B&H currently has a deal on the MSI Gaming X Trio for $1,899, with a $100 mail-in rebate. That's not a 'bargain' in any way, shape, or form, but if you simply must have the fastest GPU around, power and price be damned, this is the card to get. Just know that Nvidia Ada GPUs are likely to arrive around September, and we fully expect the "RTX 4080" (whatever it ends up being called) to deliver better performance than the 3090 Ti for about half the price.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: EVGA)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3090
$1,499 MSRP; $1,699 retail; $1,500 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3090

Dell OEM RTX 3090 at Amazon
EVGA RTX 3090 FTW3 Ultra Gaming at EVGA
Gigabyte RTX 3090 Gaming OC at Newegg

Stepping down to the RTX 3090 isn't a great idea, as the cards have memory on both sides of the PCB, which generally leads to higher GDDR6X temperatures — too high in many cases, frankly. It's about 8–9% slower than the 3090 Ti, and right now the cheapest 3090 only costs about $100 less than the cheapest 3090 Ti. Stepping up to a faster card normally gives diminishing returns, but at present it's 6% more money for 10% more performance. There aren't many original 3090 cards available either, so prices may continue to stagnate above the nominal MSRP.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Zotac)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 Ti
$1,199 MSRP; $1,199 retail; $1,165 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3080 Ti

EVGA RTX 3080 Ti XC3 Ultra Gaming at EVGA
Gigabyte RTX 3080 Ti Gaming OC at Newegg
Zotac RTX 3080 Ti Trinity OC at Amazon

The main difference between the RTX 3080 Ti and the RTX 3090 is that the 3080 Ti has half as much memory. It's also technically clocked a bit slower, at least going by the reference clocks, but in practice the 3080 Ti is only a few percent slower than the 3090. If you're still interested in cryptocurrency mining, note that the 3080 Ti cards all have Nvidia's LHR limiter in place, though NiceHash has managed to crack that — not that we'd suggest buying more cards for mining at this late stage in the game. As one of the more recent Nvidia releases, the MSRP is also quite inflated — too inflated, many would say. We expect the future "RTX 4070" will deliver roughly the same level of performance for half the price.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: MSI)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 12GB
No MSRP; $819 retail; $984 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3080 12GB

EVGA RTX 3080 12GB XC3 Ultra Gaming at Amazon
MSI RTX 3080 12GB Ventus at Newegg
Zotac RTX 3080 12GB Trinity OC at Amazon

Nvidia's 12GB update to the RTX 3080 adds a few more GPU cores and doesn't come with an official MSRP, though unofficially we'd put it at around $799 — $100 more than the 10GB card. Depending on the card you get, the factory overclock can nearly make up for any loss in GPU cores compared to the RTX 3080 Ti, though normally we expect it to be about 5% slower. You still get the same 12GB of GDDR6X memory, and it's one of the better high-end offerings right now, particularly if you want Nvidia's superior ray tracing hardware and DLSS capabilities. Right now, the least expensive 3080 12GB actually costs less than the cheapest 10GB model, though note that the LHR limiter remains in full effect on the 3080 12GB.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: EVGA)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3080 10GB
$699 MSRP; $849 retail; $947 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3080

EVGA RTX 3080 FTW3 Ultra Gaming at EVGA
Gigabyte RTX 3080 Gaming OC at Newegg
MSI RTX 3080 Ventus 3X at Amazon

The RTX 3080 launch presented a price and performance ratio that was almost too good to be true, and we've never really seen the GPU in large quantities sold for anywhere close to its $699 MSRP. Early on, scalpers pushed the price well above $1,000, and at the height of cryptocurrency mining, the 3080 was selling for over $2,100 on eBay. Even now, relative to the MSRP, this remains one of the most "overpriced" cards. You can pick up a 3080 10GB for as little as $850 now, just $150 more than the MSRP, but the above 12GB model currently represents the better deal. Again, bear in mind the pending Ada launch, which will likely have an "RTX 4070" class card for less money with more performance.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Asus)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 Ti
$599 MSRP; $699 retail; $726 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3070 Ti

Asus RTX 3070 Ti TUF Gaming at Newegg
MSI RTX 3070 Ti Ventus 3X at Newegg
Zotac RTX 3070 Ti Trinity OC at Amazon

There's a relatively large gap in performance going from the RTX 3080 down to the RTX 3070 Ti, mostly thanks to the loss of memory and memory bandwidth. At higher resolutions like 1440p and 4K, the 3080 delivers 15–30% higher frame rates — sometimes more, in cases where 8GB simply isn't sufficient for the data set (like in Total War: Warhammer 3 at 4K ultra). The move to GDDR6X memory also caused an abnormally large jump in power use compared to the vanilla 3070, though it can be a bit difficult to find the standard 3070 in stock these days.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: PNY)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070
$499 MSRP; $609 retail; $682 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3070

Asus RTX 3070 KO Win at Newegg
MSI RTX 3070 Ventus 2X at Newegg
PNY RTX 3070 XLR8 at Amazon

Nvidia's RTX 3070 might as well be effectively discontinued at this stage, as it's difficult to find cards in stock. Of those we actually could find, several cost nearly as much as the 3070 Ti. If you really want to avoid the higher power use of the Ti, the MSI model sells for just over $600 right now. There's also relatively little difference in performance between this and the 3060 Ti below, which is more readily available.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: MSI)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3060 Ti
$399 MSRP; $559 retail; $606 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3060 Ti

EVGA RTX 3060 Ti XC Gaming at Amazon
Gigabyte  RTX 3060 Ti Gaming OC at Newegg
MSI RTX 3060 Ti Ventus at Newegg

Like the RTX 3070, the RTX 3060 Ti seems to be more difficult to find and currently sits at higher prices, relative to the MSRP, than some of the other Nvidia GPUs. The lowest price we're tracking is still 40% higher than the suggested starting price, and in terms of performance, the 3060 Ti lands between AMD's RX 6600 XT and the RX 6700 XT. Given the extra memory and added performance of the 6700 XT, being able to find it at a lower price makes it an easy pick, unless you absolutely love playing DXR games with DLSS enabled.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3060
$329 MSRP; $379 retail; $434 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3060

Gigabyte RTX 3060 Windforce at Amazon
MSI RTX 3060 Ventus 2X at Newegg
PNY RTX 3060 XLR8 at Amazon

Nvidia's RTX 3060 was the first card to implement the LHR mining rate limiter, which was subsequently broken and then fixed with a new revision of the VBIOS — and is now broken again thanks to NiceHash. For new cards, the lowest price is $409.99 at Newegg, though there's an open box Asus card for just $379.99, making this the best value on an RTX 30-series GPU right now. Nvidia's 3060 competes well against AMD's RX 6600, which also has the same nominal $329 starting price. Hopefully, we'll see these cards drop another 20–30% in the coming months, as we don't anticipate seeing an Ada alternative "RTX 4060" until sometime in 2023.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Asus)

Nvidia GeForce RTX 3050
$249 MSRP; $314 retail; $316 eBay
Read our full review: GeForce RTX 3050

EVGA RTX 3050 XC Gaming at Newegg
EVGA RTX 3050 XC Gaming at EVGA
MSI RTX 3050 Ventus at Amazon

Nvidia's slowest RTX card to date, the 3050 generally comes in a bit behind the previous generation RTX 2060, despite having 2GB more VRAM. There are a few exceptions, but overall the 2060 remains the superior card — just avoid using settings that go beyond its 6GB VRAM limit. We've seen the RTX 3050 in stock several times during the past month for under $300, though right now the best we can do is $315. That's a 26% markup, so if you want a 3050, try to hold off until you can pick it up for closer to $250.

AMD RX 6000-Series GPUs

GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: ASRock)

AMD Radeon RX 6950 XT
$1,099 MSRP; $1,099 retail; nothing on eBay
Read our full review: Radeon RX 6950 XT

ASRock RX 6950 XT Formula OC at Newegg
PowerColor RX 6950 XT Red Devil at Amazon
Sapphire RX 6950 XT Toxic at Amazon

The new RX 6950 XT now ranks as the fastest AMD consumer graphics card, with up to 10% more performance than the 6900 XT. If we ignore ray tracing and DLSS performance, the 6950 XT takes the crown from Nvidia's best, at least at 1080p and 1440p. It's still about 6% slower than the RTX 3090 Ti at 4K ultra, but more critically, ray tracing performance falls far behind Nvidia's top GPUs. Even the RTX 3070 Ti can trade blows with the RX 6950 XT in demanding DXR games, and that's without enabling DLSS. Like many of AMD's GPUs, you can find the 6950 XT starting at MSRP, including Sapphire's liquid-cooled Toxic model.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: MSI)

AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT
$999 MSRP; $899 retail; $900 eBay
Read our full review: Radeon RX 6900 XT

ASRock RX 6900 XT Phantom Gaming D at Newegg
PowerColor RX 6900 XT Red Devil at Amazon
XFX RX 6900 XT Speedster Merc319 at Newegg

The RX 6900 XT has lost its pole position for AMD cards, and now the price has dropped about $100. It's still a capable GPU, but if you're after bragging rights you'll want the new 6950 XT. If you're not after bragging rights, we'd suggest putting a pause on upgrading your graphics card until the incoming Ada and RDNA 3 GPUs land, or at the very least try to get by with something priced below $500.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Sapphire)

AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT
$649 MSRP; $799 retail; $799 eBay
Read our full review: Radeon RX 6800 XT

MSI RX 6800 XT Gaming Z Trio at Newegg
Sapphire RX 6800 XT Pulse at Amazon
XFX RX 6800 XT Speedster Merc319 Core at Newegg

The RX 6800 XT only drops performance by about 7% compared to the 6900 XT, and you save about 11% in cost. Overall, it's a more sensible choice, but we question spending this much money on a new GPU when the next generation cards are potentially just months away — granted, we don't know what price or availability will be like, but hopefully it will be better in both cases. In traditional games, the 6800 XT trades blows with the 3080 Ti, falling somewhat behind (by 9%) at 4K ultra, but even without DLSS, it can only keep up with the RTX 3070 in DXR games.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: ASRock)

AMD Radeon RX 6800
$579 MSRP; $759 retail; $687 eBay
Read our full review: Radeon RX 6800

ASRock RX 6800 Phantom Gaming D at Newegg
PowerColor RX 6800 Red Dragon at Amazon
Sapphire RX 6800 Pulse at Amazon

AMD's Radeon RX 6800 has always been in a bit of a tight spot. The official launch price was only 10% lower than the 6800 XT, while performance was about 15% slower due to the curbed GPU shader counts and lower clocks. However, Mining performance basically matches the 6900 XT, which meant that at the height of the crypto-bubble, the vanilla RX 6800 cost nearly as much as the RX 6900 XT and was very hard to find. These days, the price remains higher than we'd like, and you only save about 5% compared to the 6800 XT while still sacrificing 15% performance. So look to the 6700/6750 XT if you want a more affordable but still fast AMD GPU.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Gigabyte)

AMD Radeon RX 6750 XT
$549 MSRP; $549 retail; not yet on eBay
Full review coming soon!

ASRock RX 6750 XT Challenger Pro at Newegg
Gigabyte RX 6750 XT Gaming OC at Newegg
PowerColor RX 6750 XT Red Devil at Amazon

The RX 6750 XT represents one of three "new" AMD GPUs, all at higher prices than the models they nominally replace. In our testing, the RX 6750 is only up to 5% faster than the RX 6700 XT, which is almost what you'd get from a modest overclock. The recommended price meanwhile increased by $70, which already feels bad in the wake of falling GPU prices. Performance trades blows with Nvidia's RTX 3070, with Nvidia holding a slight lead but currently with a $60 premium. Nvidia also runs much faster in DXR games, however, so the added cost might be worth paying.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Various)

AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT
$479 MSRP; $484 retail; $489 eBay
Read our full review: Radeon RX 6700 XT

ASRock RX 6700 XT Challenger D at Newegg
MSI RX 6700 XT Mech 2X at Newegg
XFX RX 6700 XT Speedster at Amazon

Trimming the shader counts, die size, memory capacity, and Infinity Cache size relative to the faster Navi 21 GPU helped AMD to cut prices quite a bit. The Radeon RX 6700 XT currently ranks as one of the best overall values, with a retail price that's just a hair above the official MSRP. Performance remains strong at 1440p ultra, landing halfway between the RTX 3070 and RTX 3060 Ti in standard gaming performance — but slightly behind the RTX 3060 if you enable DXR. Considering the price is $60 lower than the 3060 Ti and over $100 less than the 3070, the 6700 XT is certainly worthy of consideration.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: PowerColor)

AMD Radeon RX 6650 XT
$399 MSRP; $399 retail; not yet on eBay
Full review coming soon!

ASRock RX 6650 XT Challenger D at Newegg
Gigabyte RX 6650 XT Eagle at Newegg
PowerColor RX 6650 XT Hellhound at Amazon

The RX 6650 XT is the only one of the new GPU models that's supposed to fully replace the outgoing RX 6600 XT. That's unfortunate, as the price is higher and performance is hardly any different — the 18Gbps GDDR6 memory just doesn't seem to help that much, possibly due to changes in memory timings. Still, it's only $30 or so more than the least expensive RX 6600 XT, so you get 3–5% for about 7.5% more money. We'll have to see if retail prices hold on the 6650 XT, or if it also starts selling below MSRP.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Various)

AMD Radeon RX 6600 XT
$379 MSRP; $373 retail; $372 eBay
Read our full review: Radeon RX 6600 XT

ASRock RX 6600 XT Challenger D at Newegg
MSI RX 6600 XT Gaming X at Amazon
XFX RX 6600 XT Speedster at Newegg

The RX 6600 XT has officially hit end of life, with the RX 6650 XT replacing it. You can still find the card, starting at $373 online, which is less than the official MSRP. Performance lands midway between the RTX 3060 and the RTX 3060 Ti, with a price that's basically tied with the former and nearly $200 less than the latter. That's at 1080p and 1440p, though quite a few games may struggle to hit 60 fps at 1440p ultra. Also, note that DXR performance takes a big 20% step down from the 6700 XT and basically only matches the RTX 2060 for ray tracing games (still without DLSS). Don't buy this for ray tracing, but it's otherwise a good upper midrange solution.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: MSI)

AMD Radeon RX 6600
$329 MSRP; $300 retail; $321 eBay
Read our full review: Radeon RX 6600

MSI RX 6600 Mech 2X at Newegg
XFX RX 6600 Speedster SWFT 210 at Newegg
XFX RX 6600 Core at Amazon

The Radeon RX 6600 is another AMD selling for less than the official MSRP. It costs less than the going rate for the RTX 3050 as well, while averaging 30% higher frame rates in our standard gaming test suite — it even tied the RTX 3060, making it well worth the price. The vanilla 6600 mostly serves as a good 1080p gaming solution, generally handling ultra settings at 60 fps or more (except for in the more demanding games like Flight Simulator and Total War: Warhammer 3), but you'll mostly want to stick with medium or high settings if you plan on running games at 1440p. Also note that ray tracing performance on the RX 6600 was quite poor, falling 12% behind the RTX 3050, if that's something you care about.


GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: PowerColor)

AMD Radeon RX 6500 XT
$199 MSRP; $199 retail; $193 eBay
Read our full review: Radeon RX 6500 XT

ASRock RX 6500 XT Phantom Gaming D at Newegg
PowerColor RX 6500 XT at Amazon
XFX RX 6500 XT Speedster QICK 210 at Newegg

Last and least of the current generation GPUs (we don't have testing data for the RX 6400 yet, though with its lower power draw and reduced GPU core counts, we're not expecting much), the RX 6500 XT underwhelms in a lot of ways. It tries to make up for that with its budget pricing, and at least somewhat succeeds. Like all of the other GPUs above it, the 6500 XT initially sold out at launch and tended to go for $300 or more, but word of its lackluster performance got out quickly and prices plummeted. You can find it now for the suggested $200 without too much difficulty, and sometimes even less. Performance only matches up against the older GTX 1650 Super and even trails the previous generation RX 5500 XT 4GB. If graphics card availability continues to improve, we expect RX 6500 XT prices to stabilize at closer to $150 eventually.

Nvidia Turing and AMD RDNA GPUs

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The current generation Nvidia Ampere and AMD RDNA 2 graphics cards are all still in production and supplies seem to be improving. That's not true of the previous generation cards, where prices haven't dropped nearly as much as on the latest GPUs and supplies remain tight. If you want to buy a previous-gen card, your best bet will often be eBay, as retail prices are either nonexistent or horribly overpriced. Here's the quick rundown of all the previous generation GPUs and the prices we're currently seeing, though do note that the eBay listings are typically for used cards.

  • GeForce RTX 2080 Ti: $1,199 MSRP, $710 eBay
  • GeForce RTX 2080 Super: $699 MSRP, $513 eBay
  • GeForce RTX 2080: $699 MSRP, $433 eBay
  • GeForce RTX 2070 Super: $499 MSRP, $424 eBay
  • GeForce RTX 2070: $499 MSRP, $380 eBay
  • GeForce RTX 2060 Super: $399 MSRP, $400 eBay
  • GeForce RTX 2060: $299 MSRP, $290 eBay
  • GeForce GTX 1660 Ti: $279 MSRP, $268 eBay
  • GeForce GTX 1660 Super: $229 MSRP, $274 eBay
  • GeForce GTX 1660: $219 MSRP,  $227 eBay
  • GeForce GTX 1650 Super: $169 MSRP, $193 eBay
  • GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6: $159 MSRP, $190 eBay
  • GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR5: $159 MSRP, $180 eBay
  • Radeon RX 5700 XT: $399 MSRP, $484 eBay
  • Radeon RX 5700: $349 MSRP, $422 eBay
  • Radeon RX 5600 XT: $279 MSRP, $313 eBay
  • Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB: $199 MSRP, $222 eBay
  • Radeon RX 5500 XT 4GB: $169 MSRP, $160 eBay

Retail prices are basically silliness in the extreme on most of the previous generation cards now. With next-gen GPUs arriving in the coming months, you should probably just laugh and move on. We're using eBay prices for all of the cards, and the only GPUs you can sometimes find in stock at retail are the RTX 2060 and some of the GTX 16-series models.

Your best options for previous generation GPUs right now are the GTX 1650 vanilla, the RX 5500 XT 4GB, and the RTX 2060. The 2060 beat the newer RTX 3050 by 8% on average, and it trailed slightly in a couple of the games that exceeded it's 6GB VRAM. We wouldn't pay more than $250–$300 for the 2060, but if you can find it at that price it's still a decent midrange card.

You'll also want to pay attention to how performance stands up to the newer cards using our GPU benchmarks hierarchy. For example, the RTX 3050 might be slower than the RTX 2060, but it's also about 15% faster than the GTX 1660 Super, and it supports the full DirectX 12 Ultimate feature set along with DLSS. Don't pay more for an inferior GTX GPU, in other words.

Closing Thoughts

GPU Retail Availability

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

If you've been holding off on a graphics card upgrade for the past two years, you might be tempted to finally take the plunge. The RX 6600 and RX 6600 XT represent the best overall picks in our book, as neither one is likely to be immediately replaced with a new RDNA 3 GPU later this year. The RX 6700 XT also represents a good value, though we do expect the $500-class cards to see more competition this fall. AMD's "refreshed" 6x50 cards aren't bad, but they're also not really better than the cards they're based on.

Nvidia's graphics cards continue to be more sought after, based on current pricing and mark ups. If you want DLSS support and better DXR performance, be prepared to pay more for the privilege. The Nvidia GPUs selling at or close to MSRP also tend to have much higher MSRPs to begin with, while the most desirable cards in theory, like the RTX 3080, RTX 3070, RTX 3060 Ti, and RTX 3060, are all still selling for 20–40% over MSRP. If you want one of those cards and aren't willing to go with AMD, we'd suggest waiting a bit more as we expect prices will continue to fall.

Intel's Arc Alchemist GPUs are also slated to arrive for desktops in the near future, but it's difficult to predict where they'll land. Early benchmarks of the mobile variants aren't particularly promising, but the higher end cards may be able to take on the likes of the RTX 3060/3070 and RX 6600/6700. Or they might fall well short, in which case only lower prices will keep Intel competitive — and drivers are still a real concern for Intel.

For Nvidia and AMD, we expect new high-end and extreme graphics cards to arrive before the end of the year. The fact that AMD just did a refresh suggests RDNA 3 won't arrive in volume until the very end of the year. Nvidia's Ada architecture meanwhile should land round around July, potentially, so if you're eyeing the RTX 3080 Ti or above, it will likely be worth the wait.

Jarred Walton is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware focusing on everything GPU. He has been working as a tech journalist since 2004, writing for AnandTech, Maximum PC, and PC Gamer. From the first S3 Virge '3D decelerators' to today's GPUs, Jarred keeps up with all the latest graphics trends and is the one to ask about game performance.

  • artk2219
    Looking forward to taking my chances on those sweet dirt cheap ex mining GPU's in the near future.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    artk2219 said:
    Looking forward to taking my chances on those sweet dirt cheap ex mining GPU's in the near future.
    I have never bought used parts for use in my main PC before but may get extremely tempted to make an exception this time around if the deals get anywhere near as good as they did in the previous crypto GPU fire sale.
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    artk2219 said:
    Looking forward to taking my chances on those sweet dirt cheap ex mining GPUs in the near future.
    I'm not sure if you're being serious or facetious, but if you know for sure a GPU was used for 24/7 mining for a year or more, I'd probably avoid it unless it really is "dirt cheap." More likely is that any used cards on eBay will be sold for the going rate, and the miners will all lie and say, "Never used for mining — I'm not even sure what that means! This card was treated great and hardly even used at all for the past two years. It's in pristine condition!" And then you'll buy it and get a dusty card that's been ridden hard and needs a good cleaning, and probably new thermal pads and thermal paste.
    Reply
  • hotaru.hino
    JarredWaltonGPU said:
    "Never used for mining — I'm not even sure what that means! This card was treated great and hardly even used at all for the past two years. It's in pristine condition!" And then you'll buy it and get a dusty card that's been ridden hard and needs a good cleaning, and probably new thermal pads and thermal paste.
    "It ran when parked."
    Reply
  • magbarn
    Tom's is being very optimistic thinking that Ada will sell for 1/2 the price of Ampere. Since they know what prices they can get away with, I'm predicting another significant price hike with 4080 going for $999 or more at launch MSRP with 4070 at the $799 tier but street price will be higher. What's also concerning is ADA will also be constrained even more by being manufactured by TSMC which seems to be a major cause of the chip shortage as they basically have a lock on all the top tier nodes.
    Reply
  • Mario.chamdjoko
    This price list is the price list a few weeks ago in Indonesia, I hope sometime in the future this pricelist will decrease again to a normal price
    Reply
  • jacob249358
    magbarn said:
    Tom's is being very optimistic thinking that Ada will sell for 1/2 the price of Ampere. Since they know what prices they can get away with, I'm predicting another significant price hike with 4080 going for $999 or more at launch MSRP with 4070 at the $799 tier but street price will be higher. What's also concerning is ADA will also be constrained even more by being manufactured by TSMC which seems to be a major cause of the chip shortage as they basically have a lock on all the top tier nodes.
    I mean the 4070 is supposed to match or beat the 3090 from some leaks so a price jump would be expected
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    jacob249358 said:
    I mean the 4070 is supposed to match or beat the 3090 from some leaks so a price jump would be expected
    I'm expecting 30-50% hikes across most of the product stack, basically half as much as the 60-100% gen-on-gen performance bumps. High enough that they may price themselves out of much of the market regardless of how good the performance may be.
    Reply
  • Co BIY
    InvalidError said:
    I'm expecting 30-50% hikes across most of the product stack, basically half as much as the 60-100% gen-on-gen performance bumps. High enough that they may price themselves out of much of the market regardless of how good the performance may be.

    15% increase would really only be keeping up with inflation. Figure another 15% for BOM price increases. 10-15% for Foundry price increases.

    I don't think the danger is pricing themselves out of the market. The danger is the market pricing itself out of relevance.

    Only hope of price moderation is Intel's entry into the market. But my expectations are dampened by the fact that they will not be bringing their manufacturing weight to bear since the GPU production will be outsourced.
    Reply
  • JarredWaltonGPU
    magbarn said:
    Tom's is being very optimistic thinking that Ada will sell for 1/2 the price of Ampere. Since they know what prices they can get away with, I'm predicting another significant price hike with 4080 going for $999 or more at launch MSRP with 4070 at the $799 tier but street price will be higher. What's also concerning is ADA will also be constrained even more by being manufactured by TSMC which seems to be a major cause of the chip shortage as they basically have a lock on all the top tier nodes.
    GPU prices are falling because mining isn't there to support the extreme inflation of last year. Nvidia has secured manufacturing space and paid billions in advance to do so, and it wouldn't do that if it didn't expect to sell plenty of cards. It will also have to compete with miners potentially offloading millions of used RTX 30-series cards. Unless something happens to screw up supply, I expect prices roughly as follows:

    RTX 4090: $1,999 — a $500 jump from the 3090, with performance probably 50% higher than the 3090 Ti (at 4K ultra).
    RTX 4080: $999 — a $300 jump from the 3080, with performance 30% higher than the 3090 Ti.
    RTX 4070: $699 — a $200 jump from the 3070, with performance basically matching the 3090 Ti.
    RTX 4060: $499 — a $160 jump from the 3060, with performance close to the RTX 3080.
    RTX 4050: $329 — a $70 increase from the 3050 for approximately RTX 3070 performance.

    Those names might change, potentially a lot, so there could be "Ti" variants in between a bunch of the models. But basically that's where I expect prices to land right now. So when I say there will be a new RTX 4080 that costs half as much as the 3090 Ti and provides better performance, that's what I'm thinking.

    Maybe Nvidia will surprise us with better prices, and of course the 4050/4060 won't be released until mid to late 2023. There's also potentially room for an "RTX 4040" or something, because at present the GTX 16-series cards are the only sub-$250 offerings from Nvidia. I doubt it will fully leave the budget sector, but I'm not sure what exactly it will do to compete. A new GTX series would be really weird at this point, so maybe just take the 2060 design (or 3050) and put it on 5nm, or even 7nm/8nm, and sell it at a lower price.
    Reply