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2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track: Telematics And Infotainment

Hyundai offers a Blue Link mobile application for iOS and Android phones to control certain features of its vehicles. We tested the Android-based version of the app, since that's our primary mobile operating environment. Pleasantly, Hyundai's Blue Link app for Android officially works on Android 2.2 and newer devices. We had no major issues running it on our Samsung Galaxy Nexus equipped with the AOKP Milestone 6 ROM.

The application is fairly simple, giving you access to remote start, the door locks, the car's horn and headlights, and a vehicle report feature. Everything worked the way it was advertised, but we do lament that it takes so long to actually execute a command sent through the Blue Link mobile app.

We certainly understand that the software has to communicate through the phone and over a vehicle data network. However, it takes around one minute for a command to register. Hyundai positions this as a safety net for folks who might worry that they forgot to lock their car before leaving on a trip, and for that purpose, the Blue Link app is indeed useful. It's still a novel feature, though. For instance, it's all well and good to fire up your car remotely. But we wish that Hyundai would go a step further and add climate control commands. Otherwise, you're resigned to dialing those settings in before you leave the car.

In theory, it's also nice to have access to the horn and headlights. Hyundai touts this as a way to find your car in a crowded parking lot. If you misplace your vehicle and wind up out of the key's range, this could come in useful. However, the fob has a perfectly functional panic button that does the exact same thing without traversing a cellular network.

The vehicle reports are pretty standard, conveying any faults found by the on-board computer. We didn’t have any issues with our test mule, so the reports were consistently uneventful.

  • shahrooz
    waiting for the Crysis guy
    Reply
  • Nintendo Maniac 64
    I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).

    Now THAT'S something Tom's should review. :P
    Reply
  • assasin32
    My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.

    And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.
    Reply
  • stellato12
    .....but can it play Crysis?
    Reply
  • cknobman
    Waiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.
    Reply
  • tuanies
    9537403 said:
    I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).

    Now THAT'S something Tom's should review. :P

    We're trying to get one in for a week but considering how well they're selling it'll be a while.


    9537406 said:
    My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.

    And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.

    They still have aux inputs. However, I have an article idea that'll appeal to smartphone users such as yourself - just waiting for the Windows Phone 8 launch to commence ;) I'm open to any ideas you want to see covered though.

    9537418 said:
    .....but can it play Crysis?

    No but if you want to port Angry Birds or Duke Nukem 3D to QNX and find a way to get them loaded onto the infotainment system, go for it :p

    9537421 said:
    Waiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.

    You and i both. The Hyundai is a fun daily, but that extra weight doesn't help it around a track.

    Reply
  • What is this on Tom's again....?
    Reply
  • travish82
    348 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque... WTF? I feel like I've been living under a rock. I guess this is what happens when you only buy used cars with cash. Suddenly Hyundias are freaking fast.
    Reply
  • xsamitt
    I come here for Commuters not cars.This site has really lost it.
    Reply
  • xsamitt
    Make that computers lol.
    Reply