Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Ubisoft's Internet-required DRM Already Cracked

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 45 comments

Hackers have already found a way around Ubisoft's Internet DRM that's used on Silent Hunter 5 and Assassin's Creed II.

Last month, we found out about a new Ubisoft DRM scheme that requires PC gamers to be constantly connected to the Internet in order to play an authenticated game. With the highly anticipated Assassin's Creed II and Settlers VII being some of those titles protected under the new scheme, gamers voiced their concerns over such restrictive and potentially inconvenient DRM.

Of course, it'd be naïve to believe that pirates won't be doing their best in order to circumvent this protection. One of Ubisoft's first titles to use this new scheme, Silent Hunter 5: Battle of the Atlantic, released earlier this week – and it didn't take much time for pirates to crack the DRM.

In the release notes for the pirated version of Silent Hunter 5, the hackers instruct not to use the Ubisoft launcher or to block any connection to the Internet, and then use some modified files to run the game. At the end of the note, the hackers also urge gamers to support the companies that make the software they enjoy.

We cannot verify whether or not the cracked files effectively bypass Ubisoft's copy protection schemes, but it's clear that the pirates are tinkering with it.

Display 45 Comments.
This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 34 Hide
    bison88 , March 4, 2010 6:17 PM
    Victory for PC Gamers! This DRM business and anti-pirating schemes are doing nothing more than hurting the already dwindling market share of PC games, NOT helping. When will they learn? Stop destroying out platform for gaming please, we would appreciate it much if actually built games that revolve around the PC's and not turn them into console ports.
  • 27 Hide
    kavic , March 4, 2010 6:19 PM
    I knew it would only be a matter of time, all DRM does now is make it a pain for those who are legit to play there games.
  • 23 Hide
    kyeana , March 4, 2010 6:22 PM
    When will the developers learn...

    I'm all for them getting paid for their work, but that sort of DRM just isn't the way to do it. So far my favorite 'drm' is steam hands down, simply because it complements the legitimate users instead of harming them. (I love not having to worry about physical media).
Other Comments
  • 34 Hide
    bison88 , March 4, 2010 6:17 PM
    Victory for PC Gamers! This DRM business and anti-pirating schemes are doing nothing more than hurting the already dwindling market share of PC games, NOT helping. When will they learn? Stop destroying out platform for gaming please, we would appreciate it much if actually built games that revolve around the PC's and not turn them into console ports.
  • 21 Hide
    SuckRaven , March 4, 2010 6:17 PM
    If it's man made, it will be cracked. It's only a matter of time. In this case, it seems, not too much time at all.
  • 27 Hide
    kavic , March 4, 2010 6:19 PM
    I knew it would only be a matter of time, all DRM does now is make it a pain for those who are legit to play there games.
  • 1 Hide
    rodney_ws , March 4, 2010 6:20 PM
    I remember when I heard about this I actually had to ask myself if I owned any Ubisoft games... I actually found 2. One was TERRIBLE... the other was pretty decent, but neither was this Draconian in its efforts to thwart piracy. In full disclosure... I bought both new. Not now!!!
  • 12 Hide
    formin , March 4, 2010 6:22 PM
    the ratio of total work hours for programming DRM : time taken to crack it is probably around 1000:1
    lol gotta love it
  • 23 Hide
    kyeana , March 4, 2010 6:22 PM
    When will the developers learn...

    I'm all for them getting paid for their work, but that sort of DRM just isn't the way to do it. So far my favorite 'drm' is steam hands down, simply because it complements the legitimate users instead of harming them. (I love not having to worry about physical media).
  • -1 Hide
    justsomeone , March 4, 2010 6:25 PM
    If you hack a system, you're a hacker. So if you crack DRM, are you a cracker?
  • 9 Hide
    drksilenc , March 4, 2010 6:26 PM
    completely agree kyeana and the fact u can activate on as many pcs as you want makes it better to boot
  • 1 Hide
    cscott_it , March 4, 2010 6:27 PM
    http://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2010/2/19/

    That's really all I have to say on the issue, because that's the common mind-frame on the subjuct matter.
  • 9 Hide
    GeoMan , March 4, 2010 6:31 PM
    DRM like this only serves to hurt PAYING CUSTOMERS! When will it dawn on game publishers that DRM that makes it more difficult to play games only encourages piracy? Why would I pay for the privilege of not being able to play a game when the game servers are down or I’m not connected to the internet?
  • 5 Hide
    bak0n , March 4, 2010 6:38 PM
    I don't own a single DRM pc game. And I only only 3 non pc games. I might be forced back to pen and paper games if this keeps up.
  • -2 Hide
    wiinippongamer , March 4, 2010 6:41 PM
    told ya
  • 10 Hide
    gsacks , March 4, 2010 6:42 PM
    kyeanaWhen will the developers learn...I'm all for them getting paid for their work, but that sort of DRM just isn't the way to do it. So far my favorite 'drm' is steam hands down, simply because it complements the legitimate users instead of harming them. (I love not having to worry about physical media).


    I think your point is a good one, but don't blame the developers. Most of them probably agree with you. It is the suits that force the inclusion of DRM.
  • -1 Hide
    Kelavarus , March 4, 2010 6:51 PM
    kyeanaWhen will the developers learn...I'm all for them getting paid for their work, but that sort of DRM just isn't the way to do it. So far my favorite 'drm' is steam hands down, simply because it complements the legitimate users instead of harming them. (I love not having to worry about physical media).


    Bulls**t. With my Internet that I used to have, it went out so often Steam was just as bad as this online thing from Ubisoft. Now it's not as issue, and so neither would the Ubisoft stuff, but whatever.

    And offline is a load of crock, for me. It rarely works. Notice how many patches lately have included "Fixed offline mode." and even the latest I think said "Fixed offline mode. Really."

    I just don't see how Steam is all that better. With the Internet I have now, I don't mind either, but Steam doesn't seem to be the golden standard many people hold it as to me.
  • 5 Hide
    velocityg4 , March 4, 2010 6:54 PM
    Whenever I buy a new game from Amazon the first two things I do is download the latest update then the latest crack for the game so that I can avoid all the DRM issues. Looks like I will have to do the same with Assassins Creed 2.

    What is horrible is that I get pleasantly surprised when all a game requires is typing in the license key. Not having to activate, register, leave the disc in my drive, &c.

    I don't see the point in pirating games since so many great titles over a year or two old can be had for less than $15.
  • 4 Hide
    Vestin , March 4, 2010 6:54 PM
  • 0 Hide
    Bluescreendeath , March 4, 2010 6:57 PM
    Support for game companies that use invasive and time consuming DRM on their programs? No thanks.

    The only company I regularly buy games from/don't bootleg is Bethesda Works - they only use minimal securoms such as a simple disc check.

    Support companies that don't *** over their customers with intrusive DRM!
  • 0 Hide
    sliem , March 4, 2010 7:06 PM
    justsomeoneIf you hack a system, you're a hacker. So if you crack DRM, are you a cracker?


    Of course. What's so funny. Cracker.
  • 0 Hide
    nforce4max , March 4, 2010 7:06 PM
    YES!!!!!!!!!!
Display more comments