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A New Platform: Mozilla Against The World

By - Source: Tom's Guide US | B 27 comments

Mozilla has a problem. The dilemma is Firefox, its core product that we all credit for turning the modern web browser into what it is today. The browser's role is declining and platforms are beginning to rule the world. But Mozilla has an idea.

Mozilla has been standing still far too long. In a very pessimistic view, you could say that Microsoft has been run over by Google and Apple trains that are carrying the Internet masses from the old Internet to a new Internet - an Internet that we so often describe as walled gardens. Mozilla has a train as well, but it is a slow train that can't carry as many passengers and few people know about that train and its arrival and departure times.

Only if you have been vacationing in the Gobi desert for the past three years you may be able to say that you don't know about the changes our Internet is facing. The open Internet with its variety of websites is moving to a much more app- and services-focused model that has been fueled by the success of mobile devices, most notably iOS and Android products. If Apple and Google have their way, a future consumer Internet will be app-driven and mostly comprised of locked down environments that can be controlled by them. The motivations range from Apple's tight ecosystem to Google's advertising revenues that are leveraged by a product environment that promotes the use of Google products and locks other out.

Add to that equation Microsoft, which is trying to catch up with Windows 8 and establish a similar model next year and you, as a consumer, have a choice between three great environments. Of course, there are more options, but do we really count on WebOS to succeed in this high-rollers game? Or Blackberry? Let's not be silly. We don't.

One of the more silent implications of this whole game, and an implication we often forget to notice is the web browser - the very software we use to navigate the Internet, but a software that many of us don't use anymore on smartphones and a software may be turned into irrelevance as apps become more important. In a likely scenario, the browser will be an enabler of apps, but it may be turned into an occasional app, as it is the case on your phone today. One of the big questions is how Mozilla will react to this big app battle? Can its open web app idea really compete with Apple? How can it use its 400 million users? Will it have to surrender its user base, million by million?

If you have read my columns before, you may remember that I have been arguing since the beginning of time that Mozilla will need a platform itself - a powerful platform that maintains a reason for its users to stay and not switch to Chrome OS, where the only choice is Chrome, not to iOS, where the obvious choice is Safari and Firefox is unavailable, and not to Windows 8, which will pitch IE10 as the best browser. Mozilla's Seabird phone was probably the best indication that Mozilla should build more than a just browser. Boot-to-Gecko was a first sign that Mozilla will expand beyond Firefox with an operating system targeted at smart devices: If Mozilla gets it right, it can squarely position B2G as an open alternative to iOS, Android and Windows Phone. Given its reputation, Mozilla may be the only player left that can challenge the big 3 and keep their feet on the ground.

However, Mozilla isn't stopping at B2G. Chairman Mitchell Baker revealed that Mozilla will also be building non-Gecko products. Those products will be focusing on what Baker calls a platform for your "Internet Life" and help users manage their information in the distributed Internet. It enables Mozilla to go places where Firefox can't go, for example iOS. It will help Mozilla to make a case for Firefox in places it is being denied access to. It is a platform that is complementing Firefox in a way that will help the Mozilla to evolve into a platform.

Of course, if Mozilla is being denied access to iOS today, what would motivate Apple to allow access in the future? Mozilla says it is the openness of the idea and the technology that will make people want to use such a platform. The idea here is basically to attract people to a technology that will give them more power and ultimately more control over their information and technology they use the Internet. In this strategy, an Internet Life platform has to be seen in combination with B2G and Firefox and, in such a case, Mozilla may be able to create a very powerful open alternative to those products that drive corporate interests. Consider it Firefox all over again, just on a much larger scale.

This time, Mozilla isn't going just against Microsoft. This time, Mozilla needs to compete with Google, Apple, Microsoft and most likely Facebook as well. Its products need to be compelling and powerful enough to make an open platform the more attractive alternative to Google's and Apple's walled gardens. Mozilla can't consider its mission a war against the world, but it is a massive undertaking that will include confrontation and challenge Mozilla to the core. It will require Mozilla to make much more efficient use of its resources than Apple and Google do, as it cannot match any of their budgets. Mozilla will have to be driven by its ideals and its talent. If it returns to its roots, it has every chance to succeed and we consumers should understand that Mozilla's balancing forced are important to keep the industry and consumer interests in an open web in a healthy balance.

Whether Mozilla likes it or not, its ideas have to move against the current global trend. Mozilla may make more enemies. However, the participation of Mozilla is likely to drive innovation, and a choice of an open web platform and even an open mobile platform that is tied to the Mozilla brand is an option I would welcome anyday.

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Top Comments
  • 27 Hide
    undead_assault , August 6, 2011 10:22 PM
    hmmm, well I hope Google, Microsoft, Apple won't try to stop Mozilla with their patent infringements.
    Seriously, these patent wars slow down innovation.
  • 16 Hide
    Senor Snarf , August 7, 2011 3:08 AM
    The day "apps" replace websites is the day I stop using the Internet.
Other Comments
  • 27 Hide
    undead_assault , August 6, 2011 10:22 PM
    hmmm, well I hope Google, Microsoft, Apple won't try to stop Mozilla with their patent infringements.
    Seriously, these patent wars slow down innovation.
  • 4 Hide
    Anonymous , August 6, 2011 11:50 PM
    Oh look it's an article written by Wolfgang Gruener expect a bunch of mentions of Apple and many many praises
  • 3 Hide
    stm1185 , August 7, 2011 1:04 AM
    How does Mozilla make money? They give away free software, so why does it matter to them if they can't put a browser that is free on the iPhone. How will they go out of business when they dont appear to do business?
  • 0 Hide
    christop , August 7, 2011 1:19 AM
    I agree with STM1185. How do they make money?
  • 3 Hide
    Camikazi , August 7, 2011 1:30 AM
    christopI agree with STM1185. How do they make money?

    Mostly Google from what I can tell, Google gives them money, Mozilla sets default search and homepage to Google and both are happy. No Google will not stop supporting Mozilla, since with supporting them Google has full control of Chrome while it has partial control of Firefox, if it stops Mozilla might look to MS which means Google loses all those default searches to Bing!
  • 2 Hide
    ElMoIsEviL , August 7, 2011 1:38 AM
    Just root your droid and then install a bunch of applications you can find easily online. It isn't that closed ended of a system and rooting is as easy as SuperOneClick (or in the case of my device a simple Kernel/Modem/Image Flash).

    Simple. Very Simple.
  • 9 Hide
    killerclick , August 7, 2011 2:17 AM
    Oh, Wolfgang, you and your flame-bait articles. The number of app users is dwarfed by the number of actual internet users, and Apple is pretty much a nonentity outside the US.
    The users will use whatever they find most useful, not simply take whatever they are offered (like Apple fans do). Sure, apps are growing in popularity at the moment (no where to go but up), but once HTML 5 browsers become ubiquitous, developers and content providers will realize what Compuserve, Microsoft and others failed to realize in time in the '90s - that the web is what it is because it's open.
  • 16 Hide
    Senor Snarf , August 7, 2011 3:08 AM
    The day "apps" replace websites is the day I stop using the Internet.
  • 1 Hide
    natmaster , August 7, 2011 5:53 AM
    Right when Browsers are taking over from walled gardens, someone tries to say the opposite is happening? LOL. Way to not understand browsers yet again Toms.
  • 1 Hide
    KonstantinDK , August 7, 2011 6:04 AM
    I think Mozilla makes like 100 mil a year from google. They publish their budget somewhere on their website.
  • 3 Hide
    randomizer , August 7, 2011 7:13 AM
    Web browsers are applications.
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , August 7, 2011 9:55 AM
    smart phones are over rated. im already considering dumping my even with its grandfathered unlimited data plan.
  • 9 Hide
    chaos133 , August 7, 2011 12:19 PM
    An app for every website? Just imagine how much of a headache that would be.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , August 7, 2011 12:49 PM
    Mozilla, put thumbnails of my favorite websites like Google Chrome does and I will be pleased with you definitely.
  • 6 Hide
    pepe2907 , August 7, 2011 2:11 PM
    I have a smartphone but never use it to browse internet. Why I would want to do so an a 4" screen, if I can do it on a 24"? And I don't need a "platform" for this. A simple browser is just OK for me. And I am definitely not going to change my OS and all my software just for browsing.
    And I am not the only one.
    All this sounds a little as a tempest in a glass of water...
    Ah, and I'll prefer to keep my freedom of browsing as to be fastened to some "platform" or "service" as good it may look.
  • 1 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , August 7, 2011 4:20 PM
    They can go to hell... I don't see why I need a "platform" instead of a browser to surf the internets. Smartphones already have a bunch of "apps" which aren't really needed because the browser does exactly the same thing... And if Win8 is really trying to do the same thing - either you're wrong about it and you should get your facts straight, or you're right and I smiply won't use this feature.

    With this kind of BS, I hope Firefox stays on top and keeps the web "open and available", as they state in the "About Firefox" menu =)I don't want to use some stupid "apps" to access websites... all of that can be done in one program.

    In other words, yet another step to try and control the web.

    Quote:
    Mozilla has a train as well, but it is a slow train that can't carry as many passengers and few people know about that train and its arrival and departure times.


    Yes, because it's a luxury train that not everybody can board.

    Quote:
    This time, Mozilla needs to compete with Google, Apple, Microsoft and most likely Facebook as well. Its products need to be compelling and powerful enough to make an open platform the more attractive alternative to Google's and Apple's walled gardens.


    Compelling and powerful? Just keep the ability to surf the web without degrading to dozens of "apps", like we still do in normal browsers, and you've already won me and millions of others. These fools just don't understand... we don't need "walled gardens" and some "appeal", we just want a BROWSER - not a bunch of "apps". Keep that crap to the smartphones, though they aren't needed there either.

    Quote:
    the very software we use to navigate the Internet, but a software that many of us don't use anymore on smartphones and a software may be turned into irrelevance as apps become more important. In a likely scenario, the browser will be an enabler of apps, but it may be turned into an occasional app, as it is the case on your phone today.


    I just don't get it... WHY do these people keep telling us what BS will "most likely" happen, while nobody really needs it, and why do the stupid consumers believe them?!

    Quote:
    If Apple and Google have their way, a future consumer Internet will be app-driven and mostly comprised of locked down environments that can be controlled by them. The motivations range from Apple's tight ecosystem to Google's advertising revenues that are leveraged by a product environment that promotes the use of Google products and locks other out.

    Add to that equation Microsoft, which is trying to catch up with Windows 8 and establish a similar model next year and you, as a consumer, have a choice between three great environments.


    You know what? **** them ALL! I don't see what's so appealing about these "great environments"... sounds like another trap to me, on par with cloud BS.

    Anybody watched a movie called "Idiocracy"? Well, follow the apps and clouds, and that's where you'll end up.

    I didn't look at the article author until I've finished reading it and somehow wasn't surprised at all when I finally saw Gruener's name... This is the stupidest article from him by far. He looks like a massive troll to me, he really does. Or maybe Google and Apple pay him to publish that $h!t. Most likely, the latter... might've been as well Steve Jobs or one the Google CEOs speaking: the whole article calls you to abandon the normal, comfortable way of surfing the net and instead tries to convince you to choose from "great new environments", while presenting NO arguments whatsoever except the fact that "Google, MS and Apple are all doing it".

    Mozilla, if you can do something to ruin their plans, that'd be simply great.
  • 1 Hide
    WyomingKnott , August 7, 2011 6:05 PM
    caca112211Oh look it's an article written by Wolfgang Gruener expect a bunch of mentions of Apple and many many praises

    Actually, had you read the article, you would have seen that he hopes for the "walled garden" approach, practically invented by Apple, is not dominant. So many mentions of Apple, but the praises were for Mozilla, or at least the original model of the Web.
  • 0 Hide
    cookoy , August 7, 2011 11:23 PM
    i'd like mozilla to join the fray. the more the merrier. that's healthy competition. then firefox can be optimized fully. it takes a lot of resources to release an update for each supported platform.
  • 0 Hide
    jimmysmitty , August 8, 2011 3:38 AM
    ElMoIsEviLJust root your droid and then install a bunch of applications you can find easily online. It isn't that closed ended of a system and rooting is as easy as SuperOneClick (or in the case of my device a simple Kernel/Modem/Image Flash).Simple. Very Simple.


    Even then you don't need to root Android to be able to install programs from the web. I have done plenty of them and have not rooted my LG Ally.

    Rooting just opens it even more and allows for a custom kernal, which is normally faster than the stock Google one, and to uninstall all those pointless preinstalled apps from the service provider.

    As for Mozilla, I like them but they really need to watch out. Microsoft alone is pushing their stuff better than before. IE9 is good, Windows 7 is great and everything seems to fall into place for them to do well. Google is too, and that alone is enough to push Mozilla around.
  • 1 Hide
    dalauder , August 8, 2011 4:35 AM
    stm1185How does Mozilla make money? They give away free software, so why does it matter to them if they can't put a browser that is free on the iPhone. How will they go out of business when they dont appear to do business?
    They're a non-profit so making money doesn't matter. What matters is maintaining relevance. You can't provide the open-source service to people if your product is outdated and irrelevant (current Firefox only is relevant in stability, not performance). Firefox is only falling further behind with time. And that does come back to money, which is the root of the problem.

    Mozilla's in a tough spot. There's a lot they can do, but it's tough to say what will work or help. I agree that they need a platform very similar to Android simply to survive. There they could compete by offering rock-bottom/free licensing fees to developers with minimal charges for serving the apps to deliver the lowest prices--keeping themselves relevant. But I think that ship may have sailed. People don't want 100 different phone OS's. They want Apple, Windows, & something else (Android). Still--if it saves people money, it will catch on.

    But everyone (but Apple) is in a tough spot as things change. Windows barely matters anymore. 95% of users would be happy with Open Office and a web browser in Linux if the actually knew it was an option. A PC really only has a use for productivity software (media, programming, engineering, etc.) and gaming. Microsoft will have a similar struggle to stay relevant that Mozilla has now--but they will have money to fund it, so it should go differently.
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