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Ubuntu 12.04 Beta 1 Arrives With New HUD

Canonical has just released the first beta of Ubuntu 12.04 "Precise Pangolin," and will follow up with beta 2 next month and the final release possibly within the next eight weeks. Ubuntu 12.04 Beta 1 is a long-term support release (LTS) that introduces a new set of images for the ARMv7 "hard float" ABI, denoted as armhf, among other new features.

"12.04 continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution," the Ubuntu team reports in a blog. "The team has been hard at work throughout this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs."

Some of the listed changes in Ubuntu include an updated LibreOffice (3.5 beta 2) and a switch to Rhythmbox as the default music player (which includes the UbuntuOne music store). Users also have access to a new HUD which provides a context-sensitive menu and search interface for Unity applications. Actual Unity settings can now be configured by the System Settings panel, and Nautilus support has been added to the Unity launcher.

The new version of Ubuntu also provides enhanced support for ClickPad devices. Now when a button is pressed on the trackpad surface, a second finger may be used to drag the cursor. Canonical's Ubuntu Core has also been updated to include ARM hard float (armhf) images. Developers can use Ubuntu Core as the basis for their application demonstrations, constrained environment deployments, device support packages, and other goals.

"The technology that allows GPUs to go into a very low power consumption state when the GPU is idle (RC6) is now enabled by default for Sandy Bridge systems, which should result in considerable power savings when this stage is activated," the blog states.

To learn more about Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Beta 1, head here. Instructions to upgrade from v11.10 to 12.04 Beta 1 can be accessed here, otherwise, images can be downloaded by following this link.

  • amk-aka-Phantom
    More Unity crap, more paid stuff crap... I think I'll keep my finetuned 11.04.

    Also, can't resist:

    The team has been hard at work throughout this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

    The team has been hard at work throughout this cycle, introducing new bugs and removing useful features.
    ... 'cause that's how Ubuntu rolls ever since 11.10 :D
    Reply
  • tlmck
    Ubuntu is not too bad once you replace the desktop with LXDE. Pretty fast that way also.
    Reply
  • runswindows95
    As tlmck said, if you don't like Unity, there's Lubuntu, Xubuntu, and Kubuntu. It's the same OS minus the Unity. I'm running Xubuntu myself.
    Reply
  • jdog2pt0
    amk-aka-PhantomThe team has been hard at work throughout this cycle, introducing new bugs and removing useful features.... 'cause that's how Ubuntu rolls ever since 11.10
    You sir, win the internet. Once 11.10 starts to show its age (or I get tired of it) I'm switching to Mint. Already use Cinnamon shell so I'll probably hardly notice the change.
    Reply
  • Xubuntu for the win. ..!.. Unity
    Reply
  • nukem950
    This is why I use Mint Linux. A nice desktop with Ubuntu under the hood.
    Reply
  • nikorr
    Will try.
    Reply
  • indian-art
    "The technology that allows GPUs to go into a very low power consumption state when the GPU is idle (RC6) is now enabled by default for Sandy Bridge systems, which should result in considerable power savings when this stage is activated,"

    Good news, will extend battery life.
    Reply
  • amk-aka-Phantom
    indian-art"The technology that allows GPUs to go into a very low power consumption state when the GPU is idle (RC6) is now enabled by default for Sandy Bridge systems, which should result in considerable power savings when this stage is activated,"Good news, will extend battery life.
    Playing catchup with Windows again... can't blame them. They had to copy some power management feature from Windows to resolve some kernel power bug recently. They have to suck it up and realize that hardware is made with Windows in mind and there's no use re-inventing the bicycle with "open source drivers" and such.

    nukem950This is why I use Mint Linux. A nice desktop with Ubuntu under the hood.
    Mint rocks. I had some repository issues with it and it was slower than 11.04 on my netbook so I had to abandon it, but I liked what I saw. Maybe I'll come back to it later. For now, my EeePC will be running ICS :D
    Reply
  • randomizer
    amk-aka-PhantomPlaying catchup with Windows again... can't blame them. They had to copy some power management feature from Windows to resolve some kernel power bug recently. They have to suck it up and realize that hardware is made with Windows in mind and there's no use re-inventing the bicycle with "open source drivers" and such.They didn't copy any features. The bug was due to the kernel touching things it (apparently) shouldn't be. It assumed that the BIOS knew best whether to enable or disable the PCIe feature ASPM, and acted on it accordingly. Windows doesn't seem to do this, but instead won't touch ASPM unless explicitly given control over it. So if doing nothing is a Windows feature, then yes, they did copy one.
    Reply