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OnLive Console Free by Pre-Ordering Homefront

OnLive is currently running a special pre-order promotion for Homefront, THQ's upcoming first-person shooter developed by Kaos Studios. Customers who pre-order the game will receive a free Full PlayPass for Metro 2033 and the company's stand-alone OnLive Game System, also free.

"Purchase a Full PlayPass for 'Homefront' between February 25, 2011 (2:00 PM PST) and March 14, 2011 (11:59PM PDT) and receive a promo code for a Full PlayPass to 'Metro 2033' shortly after purchase," reads the fine print. "A limited number of OnLive subscribers will also receive an email after March 14, 2011 (11:59PM PDT) containing a promo code for a FREE OnLive Game System."

Although the $99 "console" will be free, consumers will still be responsible for shipping, handling and tax. The free offer will only be valid through the Homefront pre-order promotion and while supplies last. Promo codes for Metro 2033 and the free OnLive Game System must be redeemed by March 31, 2011 (11:59PM PDT), the company said.

For the uninitiated, OnLive is a streaming service for PC games, allowing customers to play high-end titles on most PC configurations. The minimum and recommended PC and Mac specifications are as follows:

MINIMUM SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS:

  • Internet Connection: 3 Mbps wired or Wi-Fi connection
  • Operating System: Windows 7 or Vista (32 or 64-bit) or XP SP3 (32-bit), Mac OS X 10.5.8 or later
  • Computer: Most PCs and netbooks, all Intel-based Macs
  • Screen Resolution: 1024 x 576

RECOMMENDED SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS:

  • Internet Connection: 5 Mbps wired or Wi-Fi connection
  • Operating System: Windows 7 or Vista (32 or 64-bit) or XP SP3 (32-bit)
  • Mac OS X 10.6 or later
  • Computer: Dual-core PCs, all Intel-based Macs
  • Screen Resolution: 1280 x 720

Naturally customers won't need to meet these requirements if using the stand-alone OnLive console. An HDTV with an HDMI connection is suggested, but users can also connect using analog video and analog stereo audio using an optional OnLive Component Video Adapter.

To pre-order Homefront, new consumers will need to create an account and install the OnLive client. Existing users can simply load up the OnLive client and enter the Marketplace. The game will be available on March 15, 2011 and cost $49.99 (aka Full Pass, meaning it's yours and you won't need to pay monthly access fees). The Full PlayPass cost of Metro 2033 is $39.99, making this Homefront promotion a good deal.

  • lashabane
    I wonder if they'll even be able to give these things away.
    Reply
  • alphadark
    Steam is running a deal that if you pre purchase homefront you get Metro 2033 free. Since streaming anything sucks I just went with the steam deal.
    Reply
  • chriskrum
    The fine print is telling:

    "A limited number of OnLive subcribers..."

    How limited? And you if you're not one of the lucky ones the rest of the fine print tells you that you have no recourse and are not entitled to a refund.

    The proper term for this is "lottery."

    PASS
    Reply
  • rhino13
    So has anyone here tried this.
    I don't think I could bring myself to do it myself.
    But then I never thought I'd own a console either.

    Anyway just curions if lag is as bad advertized.
    Reply
  • killerclick
    You're just fighting the inevitable. Systems like OnLive are the future because they'll kill piracy, reduce production costs and provide ridiculously low buy-in for gamers. Sure right now the resolution is low and quality broadband is not available everywhere but this will change in the future.
    In 1901 automobiles were a sorry sight but only incredibly stupid and shortsighted people failed to see the potential, just like the potential in streaming games.
    Reply
  • dimar
    Right... playing games by streaming videos in anything near HD... Maybe... In the next 100 or 200 years, that's if the big telecom companies stop monopolising internet lines, or if humans survive at all.. I guess.

    Here's an example of what's happening in Canada.
    http://stopthecap.com/category/providers/bell-canada/
    Reply
  • killerclick
    otacon72Streaming will never be the norm because every ISP has hard bandwidth caps in place.
    Well while I tried OnLive in the US I live in Europe (the crappiest part of Europe) and I have 8mbps unmetered for like $20 a month. So sorry to learn that you guys have caps on how much you download, maybe you should do something about it. Download caps in 2011, really??
    Reply
  • back_by_demand
    Steam will wait until Onlive become serious competition rather than a fad option for people who have more bandwidth than graphics power - then it will run a streaming system of it's own.

    Then Steam account holders will still be able to do the same as Onlive but with the backing of all the studios and publishers and Onlive will crumble to dust.

    Don't believe me? Watch this space.
    Reply
  • Stryter
    It'll probably carve out its own niche, but I just don't see it taking over gaming on dedicated, personal systems. PCs are always getting more powerful and cheaper and anybody who is a gamer has one, not to mention a console or two. Why would I need another service to let me play my games when I already have the hardware to do it, plus I can play them whenever, where ever, and without an internet connection (excluding a few of those DRM-heavy games like Splinter Cell, etc).

    For some very casual gamers who spend most of their money on a beefy internet connection, onlive might be a good way to go but for the rest of us (the large, large majority of us) its best just to stick to our own personal hardware that we can control.
    Reply
  • kinggraves
    killerclickYou're just fighting the inevitable. Systems like OnLive are the future because they'll kill piracy and provide ridiculously low buy-in for games. Sure right now the resolution is low and quality broadband is not available everywhere but this will change in the future.In 1901 automobiles were a sorry sight but only incredebly stupid and short sighted people failed to see the potential, just like the potential in streaming games.
    Having a game locally would always be better quality than having to stream it, it will never fully replace the experience for dedicated gamers. OnLive is more for people who aren't dedicated enough to buy/build a real PC.

    These prices aren't what I'd call low though, I shouldn't have to pay retail price for a digital copy. And the deceptive marketing is not going to win them fans. In large print it states factually that you buy the game and you get the system, with no asterisk to call attention to the fine print. It also states a "limited quantity" encouraging people to hurry and buy it without reading further. Once you read the fine print you find out you might be selected to get the system after the game comes out, preventing you from canceling it if you don't get the free system. Usually when a sweepstakes doesn't state the exact numbers of items that they're giving out, it means they aren't giving out many. Adding further insult is the fact that the offer ends on the 31st of March, giving you two weeks to redeem the offer before it expires.

    Streaming gaming might take off someday, but OnLive seems to be just out to make a quick buck, so all they're doing is hurting the concept. They benefit more from giving away the free systems but i suppose it's more important to sell a 99 dollar console than to sell games at 50 dollars a piece.
    Reply