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SilverStone SX600-G SFX Power Supply Review

SilverStone's SX600-G is one of the most capable SFX PSUs you can buy. Six-hundred watts is a lot for this form factor, and today we are going find out if the company's offering is able to deliver its advertised power even in extreme conditions.

Transient Response Tests

Advanced Transient Response Tests

In these tests, we monitor the response of the PSU in two different scenarios. First, a transient load (10A at +12V, 5A at 5V, 5A at 3.3V and 0.5A at 5VSB) is applied to the PSU for 200ms while the PSU is working at 20-percent load. In the second scenario, the PSU is hit by the same transient load while operating at 50 percent load. In both tests, we use our oscilloscope to measure the voltage drops caused by the transient load. The voltages should remain within the ATX specification's regulation limits.

These tests are crucial since they simulate transient loads a PSU is likely to handle (such as booting a RAID array, an instant 100 percent load of CPU/GPUs, etc.). We call these tests "Advanced Transient Response Tests," and they are designed to be very tough to master, especially for a PSU with a capacity below 500 W.

Advanced Transient Response 20%
VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.097V11.856V1.97%Pass
5V5.002V4.860V2.84%Pass
3.3V3.341V3.189V4.55%Pass
5VSB5.003V4.968V0.70%Pass
Advanced Transient Response 50%
VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.020V11.873V1.22%Pass
5V4.970V4.829V2.84%Pass
3.3V3.307V3.171V4.11%Pass
5VSB9.958V4.912V0.93%Pass

SilverStone manages to pass these tests. However, we would like to see lower deviations on the 3.3V rail, where the voltage dropped below 3.2V once the transient load was applied. We don't want to see such low readings there; we'd be satisfied with anything above 3.2V, in fact.

The deviation at +12V was higher than the second test with an overall higher load. Normally it's the other way around. This has to do with the primary switchers' PWM operation at lower loads. Under a normal load, the resonant controller makes them operate in FM mode.

Advanced Transient Response Comparison Charts

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Below are the oscilloscope screenshots we took during Advanced Transient Response Testing.

Transient Response At 20% Load - Oscilloscope Screenshots

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Transient Response At 50% Load - Oscilloscope Screenshots

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Turn-On Transient Tests

We measure the response of the PSU in simpler transient load scenarios -- during the power-on phase -- in the next set of tests.

For the first measurement, we turn the PSU off, dial in the maximum current the 5VSB can output and then switch on the PSU. In the second test, we dial the maximum load +12V can handle and start the PSU while it's in standby mode. In the last test, while the PSU is completely switched off (we cut off power or switch the PSU off by flipping its on/off switch), we dial the maximum load the +12V rail can handle before switching the PSU on from the loader and restoring power. The ATX specification states that recorded spikes on all rails should not exceed 10 percent of their nominal values (+10 percent for 12V is 13.2V and 5.5V for 5V).

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During the first test, the slope is absolutely perfect. In in the remaining two tests, the slope ramps up smoothly, but before the voltage settles down, there is a small dive. That's nothing to worry about; overall performance in these tests is good.

  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Price is a little high.
    Reply
  • Onus
    The price is a little high.
    I'm not sure I agree with such high ratings of some of the Corsair units, with as many failures as they apparently experience within the first year. It also doesn't bode well for the poor capacitors in this Silverstone either. So far though, at this level, there is no other choice.
    Reply
  • damric
    The review was perfect this time, Aris. My only nitpick is the graphs are hard to read.

    Well done.

    As far as the PSU itself, I was turned off by the 40C max operating temp fan kicks up at 45... bah... If they would have used better caps then temp could easily been rated for 50C.
    Reply
  • David Dewis
    I wanna use this to run a GTX 980 in the Silverstone RVZ02 with a i5-4670 (non K) That is all.
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    Nice to see that manufacturers are starting to take small form factor builds seriously. I especially like the direction that Silverstone is going in. First the RVZ02B now high quality SFF power supplies. Wave of the future?
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    This is a wonderful power supply, if you aren't pushing it altogether too hard.

    @David Dewis, go look at the Sandia Cooler. When you're done lusting after that, look at the Id-cooling Is-vc45 Vapor Chamber CPU Cooler... which you can buy right now and use to overclock an i5 in the new Raven just fine. I've got my media PC in an RVZ01 with a Pentium anniversary edition overclocked to heck, and it does just fine. (I can't wait for the RVZ02 to put my gaming rig in and run watercooling out the back.)
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    That being said. Tom's. What are you doing.

    Silverstone just released the SX500-LG, which is a very slightly longer (130mm) SFX-profile power supply that fits a 120mm fan on top, instead of a dinky, noisy 80mm fan. That's the power supply that I want to see a review of!
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    15283400 said:
    (I can't wait for the RVZ02 to put my gaming rig in and run watercooling out the back.)

    I very badly want a RVZ02, it will make a nice home for my old i5-3570K. :lol:
    Reply
  • Grognak
    52dB and more than 25 idle... "Tiny box that makes a lot of noise" isn't my definition of SFF.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    I will ask for the SX-500LG, however I have many samples to process till its turn comes to hit the test bench. Unfortunately a full PSU review needs lots of time and I won't do rushed reviews.
    Reply