Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Nokia Receives $1.35 Billion Grant to Develop the "Strongest Material Ever Tested"

By - Source: Nokia | B 31 comments

Graphene is a class 2D structure measuring just one atom thick.

Nokia has received a $1.35 billion grant to develop the strongest material to ever come to fruition.

Graphene is a class 2D structure measuring just one atom thick. It's the strongest material ever produced; 300 times tougher than steel, it's one of the lightest conductors in existence.

Nokia is leading the electronic firms within the Graphene Flagship Consortium, which includes 73 other companies and academic institutions from a number of mediums. The Finnish handset manufacturer has received a grant of $1.35 billion to research and develop graphene for practical applications, with the European Union for the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) providing the grant itself.

"Nokia is proud to be involved with this project, and we have deep roots in the field – we first started working with graphene already in 2006," said Henry Tirri, EVP, CTO of Nokia. "Since then, we have come to identify multiple areas where this material can be applied in modern computing environments. We’ve done some very promising work so far, but I believe the greatest innovations have yet to be discovered. Graphene happens to be an area where we, in Europe, have all the important players in the value chain who are ready to use it in applications. From that perspective, this is a very efficient and promising way of doing research investments for Europe."

"During the last 18 months we have seen a tremendous effort to build collaboration between European academia and industry," added Tapani Ryhänen, Nokia's head of the Sensor and Material Technologies Laboratory. "Now we have all the ingredients in place to be globally successful. We believe that new two-dimensional materials will have an impact on industrial value chains in many ways, creating opportunities for new products, services and economic growth."

Graphene


"Not only does creating a graphene research consortium open up new research possibilities, it will also create work and jobs across all of Europe," said Jani Kivioja, Research Leader at Nokia Research Center. "This kind of research is also an investment to the people that live within the EU, from an economy perspective."

"When we talk about graphene, we’ve reached a tipping point. We’re now looking at the beginning of a graphene revolution. Before this point in time, we figured out a way to manufacture cheap iron that led to the Industrial Revolution. Then there was silicon. Now, it’s time for graphene."

Tapani believes graphene is unlikely to become the norm for products, but instead it'll be used to enhance products by improving existing materials and products.

Making products out of graphene will definitely happen across lots of different industries. By introducing people from different markets together within the EU-based consortium, we can begin to make real-world applications that benefit us all.

Really, this type of technology has radically improved the properties of many materials that can be used in our industry. It was discovered in the EU, and we’re very proud to have been involved from the very early years and now to be participating in the consortium. We have a very functional research team in place that can do world-class research with our partners.

We have kept our eyes open, and believe that this will bring immediate impact to our products over the coming years in some way or another.
Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the News comments forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 36 Hide
    toolman129 , January 31, 2013 1:12 PM
    "Nokia has received a $1.35 billion grant to develop the strongest material to ever."

    Best editing I have ever.
  • 25 Hide
    tomfreak , January 31, 2013 1:24 PM
    Brace yourself, the new Nokia Lumia 3310.
  • 21 Hide
    WyomingKnott , January 31, 2013 4:47 PM
    the strongest material ever is the perforated part of toilet paper. It always tears somewhere else.
Other Comments
    Display all 31 comments.
  • 36 Hide
    toolman129 , January 31, 2013 1:12 PM
    "Nokia has received a $1.35 billion grant to develop the strongest material to ever."

    Best editing I have ever.
  • 3 Hide
    swordrage , January 31, 2013 1:21 PM
    dns7950I'm guessing Intel or IBM could have put that money to better use.. Really, why Nokia? I mean, I'm a big fan of their phones, but this isn't exactly their area of expertise, is it?


    May be "For Europe"...
  • 25 Hide
    tomfreak , January 31, 2013 1:24 PM
    Brace yourself, the new Nokia Lumia 3310.
  • 6 Hide
    Haserath , January 31, 2013 1:35 PM
    toolman129"Nokia has received a $1.35 billion grant to develop the strongest material to ever."Best editing I have ever.

    Never ever.
  • 15 Hide
    greghome , January 31, 2013 1:37 PM
    Where is my 10ghz Graphene based CPU ? :p 
  • 16 Hide
    Murissokah , January 31, 2013 1:54 PM
    Heh... smart move from Nokia. They already capitalized a lot from the spontaneous marketing generated from all the indestructible Nokia memes, and this kind of research investment helps consolidate the idea that Nokia makes unbreakable stuff. Besides, it will also be very useful for their own products.
  • 19 Hide
    Tekkaman , January 31, 2013 2:00 PM
    toolman129"Nokia has received a $1.35 billion grant to develop the strongest material to ever."Best editing I have ever.


    Best response to an article I have ever.
  • 10 Hide
    Benthon , January 31, 2013 2:04 PM
    I thought that they already had this in the Nokia 3310...
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , January 31, 2013 2:18 PM
    Geez, what's with the boasting about the EU's greatness? I mean I'm European myself, leave that "We're number 1!" shit to the 'Muricans.
  • 10 Hide
    WithoutWeakness , January 31, 2013 2:27 PM
    dns7950I'm guessing Intel or IBM could have put that money to better use.. Really, why Nokia? I mean, I'm a big fan of their phones, but this isn't exactly their area of expertise, is it?

    Nokia making indestructible stuff has historically been their exact area of expertise.
  • 9 Hide
    segio526 , January 31, 2013 2:30 PM
    Graphene must be the real deal and not just a bunch of hype. It's been one of the only emerging materials/technology to get such HUGE support from both private and public institutions. I'm only 29, but I don't think I've ever seen anything like this.
  • 3 Hide
    husker , January 31, 2013 2:49 PM
    WithoutWeaknessNokia making indestructible stuff has historically been their exact area of expertise.

    "...with the European Union for the Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) providing the grant itself."

    IBM is not a Euopean based company.
  • 3 Hide
    scrumworks , January 31, 2013 3:17 PM
    Hope they create some kickass to kick some Samsung ass.
  • -2 Hide
    zorky9 , January 31, 2013 3:19 PM
    WithoutWeaknessNokia making indestructible stuff has historically been their exact area of expertise.

    They're being destroyed by Windo....... Nah! I like Windows 8.
  • 1 Hide
    ojas , January 31, 2013 3:43 PM
    HaserathNever ever.

    Never say ever...
  • 21 Hide
    WyomingKnott , January 31, 2013 4:47 PM
    the strongest material ever is the perforated part of toilet paper. It always tears somewhere else.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , January 31, 2013 5:00 PM
    It was discovered in Manchester UK, and given to human society instead of patented! I will be utterly disappointed if there are patents that arise from the research into its mainstream use!
  • 3 Hide
    cercuitspark , January 31, 2013 5:44 PM
    Nokia already have the strongest material in the universe, their phones.
Display more comments