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Intel Threatens to Sue HDCP Crack Users

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 52 comments

Bad news for crack addicts.

Last week Intel confirmed that the master key for HDCP has been cracked and revealed to the public.

"What we have confirmed through testing is that you can derive keys for devices from this published material that do work with the keys produced by our security technology," Intel spokesman Tom Waldrop said.

"For someone to use this information to unlock anything, they would have to implement it in silicon -- make a computer chip," he added. "As a practical matter, that's a difficult and costly thing to do."

While Waldrop gave the impression that Intel wasn't scrambling to somehow rectify the situation, the spokesman was quoted in a Wired story that Intel would take legal action against anyone who used the HDCP code for a crack.

"There are laws to protect both the intellectual property involved as well as the content that is created and owned by the content providers," said Waldrop. "Should a circumvention device be created using this information, we and others would avail ourselves, as appropriate, of those remedies."

How did this code get published on the internet? Intel doesn't believe that it was leaked in any way, since it's developed and structured in a way that nobody sees it.

"Someone has used mathematics and computers to be able to work back to what the master key is," Waldrop said.

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Top Comments
  • 27 Hide
    haunted one , September 21, 2010 1:19 PM
    Quote:
    "Someone has used mathematics and computers to be able to work back to what the master key is," Waldrop said.



    They should immediately hire the guy that did it.
  • 21 Hide
    BluntObjection , September 21, 2010 1:15 PM
    Seems more like Intel is bluffing, I doubt Intel would be able to detect if you have said device installed in the first place.
  • 19 Hide
    warezme , September 21, 2010 1:15 PM
    hardware not necessary, software can emulate the hardware and use Intel's own chips to crack, then it's just a moving target, good luck with that Intel.
Other Comments
    Display all 52 comments.
  • 21 Hide
    BluntObjection , September 21, 2010 1:15 PM
    Seems more like Intel is bluffing, I doubt Intel would be able to detect if you have said device installed in the first place.
  • 19 Hide
    warezme , September 21, 2010 1:15 PM
    hardware not necessary, software can emulate the hardware and use Intel's own chips to crack, then it's just a moving target, good luck with that Intel.
  • 0 Hide
    tommysch , September 21, 2010 1:16 PM
    The way intel is going is pretty sad... I guess we still have AMD.
  • 27 Hide
    haunted one , September 21, 2010 1:19 PM
    Quote:
    "Someone has used mathematics and computers to be able to work back to what the master key is," Waldrop said.



    They should immediately hire the guy that did it.
  • 9 Hide
    icepick314 , September 21, 2010 1:20 PM
    does this mean AnyDVD HD won't need anymore "updates"?
  • 6 Hide
    Anonymous , September 21, 2010 1:21 PM
    best of luck INTEL
    when you start chasing simple users it will be the end of you...
    hope that amd wont become so greedy company with time like intel did/
  • 6 Hide
    TheMadScientist , September 21, 2010 1:37 PM
    I do not agree with Intel. A college level EE with an off-the-shelf FPGA could probably make a working decoder. Given how computers are increasing in speed, you could probably make a working device in software only, especially if you are only interested in a rip, not a real-time player.
  • 16 Hide
    saturnus , September 21, 2010 1:42 PM
    The headline is incorrect. Intel is basically saying that they will sue anyone making a chip with the code imbedded, as there is no other way to use it. And rightly so I might add.

    Nowhere is it even hinted that they would target end-users.
  • 3 Hide
    seezur , September 21, 2010 1:49 PM
    bluntobjectionSeems more like Intel is bluffing, I doubt Intel would be able to detect if you have said device installed in the first place.


    You are right, It would be extreamly difficult for them to detect a user of the chip but I think the threat is targeted at the builders of the chips that include a master key. If they went after all the users they would have to hire the RIAA's leagal team to keep up with all lawsuits.
  • 2 Hide
    zaznet , September 21, 2010 1:52 PM
    The whole "has to be done in silicon" argument seems pretty short sighted. Just because that's how Intel did it originally doesn't mean a system bypassing it has to be done the same way.
  • 1 Hide
    amnotanoobie , September 21, 2010 1:53 PM
    They are probably looking at anyone who would create a software/hardware around the use of the key.

    It was done before with the key for the DVD and dvd ripping software.
  • 1 Hide
    Pyroflea , September 21, 2010 1:54 PM
    Sounds like more bluffing to me. It really wouldn't be difficult to do some virtualization or even a full out embedded system to do this.
  • 1 Hide
    BluntObjection , September 21, 2010 2:00 PM
    zaznetThe whole "has to be done in silicon" argument seems pretty short sighted. Just because that's how Intel did it originally doesn't mean a system bypassing it has to be done the same way.


    Like just stripping the DRM from BR disks and such?
    *cough* previouslyestablishedtorrents *cough*

    seezurYou are right, It would be extreamly difficult for them to detect a user of the chip but I think the threat is targeted at the builders of the chips that include a master key. If they went after all the users they would have to hire the RIAA's leagal team to keep up with all lawsuits.


    "Good luck, I'm behind like 7 proxies!"

    Also as stated above the heading is misleading, reading the Wired.com article will clear up the vague details left by Toms.
  • 0 Hide
    flachet , September 21, 2010 2:04 PM
    I plan on having said device, so Intel can feel free to bring it on. Its my chip, attached to my hardware. Good luck with that in court.
  • 7 Hide
    DjEaZy , September 21, 2010 2:20 PM
    ... Intel Threatens to Sue HDCP Crack Users, but will be Charging $50 to Unlock CPU's Full Features... go F&#K your self... what is wrong with intel... i would say... everything....
  • 1 Hide
    x3style , September 21, 2010 2:28 PM
    Quote:
    You are right, It would be extremely difficult for them to detect a user of the chip but I think the threat is targeted at the builders of the chips that include a master key


    Like you can't make a chip that you can input any key in there? Plug into USB -> copypasta the key and move on it doesn't have to have the key right of the production line.
  • 1 Hide
    alfredonm , September 21, 2010 2:31 PM
    Bring it ON!!!!!
  • 0 Hide
    nforce4max , September 21, 2010 2:46 PM
    Greed fail oh Greedtel your fat margins aren't enough. This is why I don't buy Intel any more.
  • 2 Hide
    Aussie_Bear , September 21, 2010 2:55 PM
    Marge: I'm gonna sue the pants off you!

    Mr. Burns: You don't have to sue me to get my pants off.
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