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Intel to Accelerate Core i7

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 28 comments

Although prior Intel roadmaps did not mention Core i7 processors faster than the existing 3.2-GHz 965 Extreme Edition, the chip maker finally decided to introduce two faster models in the second quarter of this year.

Core i7 at 3.33 GHz Coming

Core i7-975 Extreme will be the company's flagship desktop processor for the upcoming months, delivering slightly increased performance thanks to a clock speed of 3.33 GHz. This equals a 4.2% clock speed increase when compared to the existing 3.2 GHz model. It is probably not really worth it, as we expect the price of this premium product to remain at $999.

However, the regular Core i7 product line will also receive a speed bump. The Core i7-950 will close the gap between the 2.93 GHz Core i7-940 processor and the Core i7-965 Extreme edition, providing a 3.06 GHz clock speed. All of the mentioned Core i7 processors are based on Intel's Nehalem architecture that is manufactured using the mature 45-nm process. They all require the X58 chipset and socket LGA1366, and they all come with 256 KB L2 cache per core and an additional, shared 8 MB L3 cache. No changes have been made to the power ratings, as all Core i7 processors remain at a TDP of 130 W, although the entry level models certainly stay well below that.

Havendale is History, Clarkdale Coming Up On Time

The latest Intel roadmap also says that the firm is on track to ship first 32-nm CPUs in the fourth quarter of 2009, which it says will be Clarkdale processors with integrated graphics. Havendale, which should have been the first product with integrated graphics, disappeared. Apparently, the Clarkdale multi chip package will consist of the 32-nm CPU paired with a 45-nm graphics unit. Clarkdale will be drop-in compatible with the 45-nm Lynnfield processor - both require the new socket LGA1156 and one of the upcoming 5-series chipsets (P55, P57). These differ from the existing chipset families by being a two-chip solution, which has the potential to lower cost and increase energy efficiency.

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  • 0 Hide
    Tindytim , February 9, 2009 10:13 AM
    Let me get this straight...

    They make marginal clock speed increases, that could be achieved through Overclocking, and they expect this to be worth our time, much less, even more of our money?

    I better be seeing some price cuts.
  • 1 Hide
    jkflipflop98 , February 9, 2009 11:23 AM
    Or what? You'll curl up in a ball and cry about it?
  • 3 Hide
    computerninja7823 , February 9, 2009 11:29 AM
    i agree tindytim. what a waste of time! i think intel should invest all that silicon in something better and more affordable.
  • Display all 28 comments.
  • 2 Hide
    Tindytim , February 9, 2009 11:41 AM
    jkflipflop98Or what? You'll curl up in a ball and cry about it?

    No, I'll buy a cheaper model for a third of the price, OC it, then get the same performance.

    Like computerninja7823, I think they could be pursuing new technologies and implementations, rather than repackaging than same model, with a variance that could be easily achieved by anyone who actually wanted it. It seems like a large waste of resources.
  • 0 Hide
    squatchman , February 9, 2009 12:40 PM
    Have you been following CPUs very long?

    How many Quad and Dual core processors has Intel released in 100mhz increments over the last three years? I'm only surprised that they're releasing just two more.
  • 2 Hide
    blackened144 , February 9, 2009 12:55 PM
    TindytimLet me get this straight...They make marginal clock speed increases, that could be achieved through Overclocking, and they expect this to be worth our time, much less, even more of our money?I better be seeing some price cuts.

    Technically, since they are releasing these faster processors at the same prices as the previous models, you can consider that a price cut.
  • 0 Hide
    Tindytim , February 9, 2009 12:59 PM
    squatchmanHave you been following CPUs very long? How many Quad and Dual core processors has Intel released in 100mhz increments over the last three years? I'm only surprised that they're releasing just two more.

    Sure, but there are usually other improvements. Lower TDPs, More Cache, something that the end user can't easily achieve.
  • 0 Hide
    Tindytim , February 9, 2009 1:19 PM
    Correction, something the end user cannot achieve.
  • 3 Hide
    dynasonic , February 9, 2009 1:30 PM
    Let's break out the rulers and drop our trousers... that's the only way we can settle this semantic squabble.
  • -3 Hide
    jrivera04 , February 9, 2009 1:39 PM
    They need to stop changing sockets!

    The 1366 should last at least as long as the 775.
  • 0 Hide
    alvine , February 9, 2009 1:57 PM
    I'm upgrading from my q6600 when 32nm comes out
  • 0 Hide
    Tindytim , February 9, 2009 2:02 PM
    jrivera04They need to stop changing sockets!The 1366 should last at least as long as the 775.

    LGA 1366 isn't going anywhere. LGA 1160 is going to be for lower to mid ranged systems. And what I've heard of LGA 1567, it's going to be for servers, but intel may never implement it with the little news I've heard about it.

    dynasonicLet's break out the rulers and drop our trousers... that's the only way we can settle this semantic squabble.

    I don't remember there being a squabble over semantics.
  • 2 Hide
    zedx , February 9, 2009 2:05 PM
    Well I was expecting something like Qx9650 Q9650 and Q9550. I'll wait some more time for the news... I hope that 940 comes down to $300 at least. Or a similar Lynnfield be available at $300...
  • 2 Hide
    zedx , February 9, 2009 2:07 PM
    Or I hope the 32nm quad / hexa core mainstream comes fast at about Q1 2010 so that I would dump my P4(yeah P4 1500mhz) finally...
  • 0 Hide
    Tindytim , February 9, 2009 2:10 PM
    zedxWell I was expecting something like Qx9650 Q9650 and Q9550.

    That was my expectation aswell.

    We saw the Q6600 - Q9300 - Q9550

    I don't ever remember any of the Core 2 line that added multiple processors that were just differently clocked versions of old processors.
  • 0 Hide
    JAYDEEJOHN , February 9, 2009 2:41 PM
    Im thinking its an Anonymous Move Delayed due to competition, or AMD for short, but yeah, I remember all those C2D moves in higher clocks by 200 Mhz, or whatever, ..... no wait, on the other hnad, theyve never done this since C2D, have they? Hmmmm
  • 0 Hide
    Tindytim , February 9, 2009 3:05 PM
    jaydeejohnIm thinking its an Anonymous Move Delayed due to competition, or AMD for short, but yeah, I remember all those C2D moves in higher clocks by 200 Mhz, or whatever, ..... no wait, on the other hnad, theyve never done this since C2D, have they? Hmmmm


    Name 3 different instances where an Old Core 2 was re-released (after the initial releases) just with a higher clock speed.
  • 0 Hide
    rocketw31 , February 9, 2009 4:40 PM
    From my understanding, these new chips are being released to introduce a new stepping. This new stepping will allow air overclocks to approach 4.5 GHz easily.

    This thread is full of crap. People obviously can't read. 1366 isn't going away, but obviously a different socket is going to be needed for an IG solution.

    No one is holding a gun to your head and saying that you have to be cutting edge, so quit your pisspants crybaby routine and spare me the drama.
  • 0 Hide
    squatchman , February 9, 2009 5:07 PM
    The Allendale and Wolfdale series chips were all basically the same. Intel just raised the multiplier and shipped it like new every 4-6 months. If you check, they also did the same with Yorkfield. I don't like to differentiate by stepping, because you generally can't shop by that.

  • 0 Hide
    RiotSniperX , February 9, 2009 6:28 PM
    So havendale is for desktops or laptops...O.o
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