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ioSafe Reveals ''Disaster-Proof'' External SSD

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 22 comments

This solid state disk can survive a collapsing building.

ioSafe's external SSD that's \ioSafe's external SSD that's "disaster-proof"

There's nothing more terrifying than to lose months and months of collected media files, especially where family digital pictures and "special movies" are concerned. If a hurricane, tornado, or some other natural disaster occurs, all of that is lost. ioSafe wants to eliminate that worry with its new disaster-proof Solo solid state drive... for consumers who actually want an SSD, that is.

"The ioSafe Solo SSD with ArmorPlate technology can protect data from 5000 lb. crush forces, 1000g shocks and 20 foot drops into rubble," the company said in its product description. "Along with standard ioSafe Solo fire and water protection, the ioSafe Solo SSD is your personal or business 'aircraft black box.'" Heck, the company even claims that the SSD can withstand a building collapse!

ioSafe also said that the Solo SSD, offering capacities ranging from 64 GB to 256 GB, can be bolted to cement floors or floor joists to guard against theft. The eternal drive can also connect to a PC, Mac, or Linux machine via an eSATA 3.0 or USB 2.0 interface. ioSafe even provides a 1-year data recovery service as part of the overall purchase, but also offers a 3 and 5-year service plan as well.

For the 64 GB version, consumers will need to shell out a whopping $499 USD. The 256 GB version, with the included 1-year data recovery service, will cost a meaty $1,249 USD. Want to beef up the data protection and get the 5-year plan? Expect to pay $1,649.99 USD for the 256 GB drive.

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Top Comments
  • 18 Hide
    bikeracer4487 , January 5, 2010 8:35 PM
    "Disaster-Proo"? In the headline? Really guys?
  • 13 Hide
    Anonymous , January 5, 2010 8:38 PM
    Disaster Proo? How about prooF reading before submitting.
  • 10 Hide
    jerreece , January 5, 2010 8:53 PM
    LOL Nobody proof reads Tom's anymore. Not even the Title!!

    Sorta like the Billion vs Trillion mistake yesterday.
Other Comments
    Display all 22 comments.
  • 18 Hide
    bikeracer4487 , January 5, 2010 8:35 PM
    "Disaster-Proo"? In the headline? Really guys?
  • 13 Hide
    Anonymous , January 5, 2010 8:38 PM
    Disaster Proo? How about prooF reading before submitting.
  • -1 Hide
    christop , January 5, 2010 8:39 PM
    damn who needs this CIA?
  • 10 Hide
    jerreece , January 5, 2010 8:53 PM
    LOL Nobody proof reads Tom's anymore. Not even the Title!!

    Sorta like the Billion vs Trillion mistake yesterday.
  • 8 Hide
    amabhy , January 5, 2010 8:56 PM
    Thought it said disaster-poo drive.

    Spell check much?
  • 4 Hide
    Bolbi , January 5, 2010 9:03 PM
    At the price, I'm surprised it doesn't have USB 3.0. At least it does offer a faster connection through eSATA...
  • 0 Hide
    Shadow703793 , January 5, 2010 9:18 PM
    So... if I put this in an oven @ 350*F+ it should survive right?
  • 3 Hide
    JeBuSBrian , January 5, 2010 9:50 PM
    @englishprofessor
    That would mean the folks writing for Tom's would actually have to do some work before they got paid. Can't have that.
  • 3 Hide
    danimal_the_animal , January 5, 2010 9:51 PM
    Sounds like a great myth-busters episode if you ask me!
  • 6 Hide
    festerovic , January 5, 2010 10:42 PM
    jerreeceLOL Nobody proof reads Tom's anymore


    No, they apparently proo read.
  • 0 Hide
    kravmaga , January 5, 2010 10:55 PM
    JeBuSBrian@englishprofessorThat would mean the folks writing for Tom's would actually have to do some work before they got paid. Can't have that.


    Actually, as far as I know there's no reason why it wouldn't survive. Most of the tiny PCB you see around in computer parts are reflow-soldered in huge industrial ovens using parts rated for more than 450+ degrees F. If you go that high, then sure the solder will melt and the tiny smc will fall off but other than that, you'd have a better chance at breaking one of these by giving it to an 8 year old who likes to plug a battery into anything with a socket.
  • 1 Hide
    kravmaga , January 5, 2010 10:56 PM
    Damn counter-intuitive interface!
    I quoted the wrong guy... Above reply was meant for Shadow703793
  • 0 Hide
    wildwell , January 5, 2010 11:34 PM
    Sounds good, but obviously SSD capacities have to continue to grow before it can really be used for content back-up as described in the article.

    With more and more users backing up in the cloud these days, this drive is either too little too late for too much, or they plan on just targeting users with very confidential data. The company is called, "ioSafe" after all.
  • 0 Hide
    muncher , January 5, 2010 11:37 PM
    "eternal drive"? ioSafe's marketing department will be loving these guys.
  • 0 Hide
    jisamaniac , January 6, 2010 3:01 AM
    You already reviewed this.
  • 0 Hide
    kelfen , January 6, 2010 9:21 AM
    all I need is a sledge hammer :D 
    oh #$#$ I slipped and hit the sdd with a sledge hammer
  • 3 Hide
    back_by_demand , January 6, 2010 9:58 AM
    Tom's don't need to spell-check or proof-read

    They have ton's of self-appointed, anal-retentive regulars who do it for them...
  • 1 Hide
    zak_mckraken , January 6, 2010 12:46 PM
    I wouldn't pay $499 to protect my "special movies" (and I would need more than 64GB), but I guess it's a great solution for small and medium businesses.

    I find it surprising that it can survive a 2.5-ton crush but not a drop from 21 feet???
  • 0 Hide
    back_by_demand , January 6, 2010 1:05 PM
    homrqtcan it survive lava?

    It can, but when the lava cools the only way you can get it back is to use explosives or pneumatic drills. They destroy the data unfortunately. You could of course wait for natural errosion over the next 3000 years to wear away the rock and retrieve your data. But don't worry, your great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great, grandkids will be able to see your stupid holiday pics a treat...
  • 2 Hide
    belardo , January 6, 2010 2:28 PM
    Its 2010, $1000+ product and its USB 2.0?
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