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Three Aftermarket Graphics Coolers On GeForce GTX 480

Three Aftermarket Graphics Coolers On GeForce GTX 480
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Today we're testing three of the largest graphics card coolers available: Arctic Cooling's Accelero XTREME Plus, DeepCool's V6000, and Zalman's VF3000F. Can these products bring performance to the table commensurate with their large triple-slot size?

If you care about tweaking and tuning your PC, then you already know that heat is your enemy. Too much heat in your computer means limited overclocking ability at best and premature hardware failure at worst.

There are two components in a modern computer that are responsible for the lion’s share of heat output: the central processing unit (CPU) and the graphics processing unit (GPU).

Modern graphics cards can create an exceptional amount of heat, and standard cooling systems struggle to keep temperatures low. Nvidia's GeForce GTX 480 is perhaps the most poignant reminder of the interaction between power, heat, and noise since Intel's Pentium 4 based on the Prescott core. We're using the GTX 480 as our example here because, frankly, it stands to benefit from aftermarket cooling the most.

To remedy this problem, you can bypass the reference cooling solution on your graphics card altogether and lean on an aftermarket solution designed to bring GPU temperatures far below what the standard models can accomplish. Today we’re testing three monster VGA coolers that promise to do just that: Arctic Cooling’s Accelero XTREME Plus, DeepCool’s V6000, and Zalman’s VF3000.

Let’s have a look at the vital statistics for these coolers before we discuss them in detail:


Arctic Cooling
Accelero XTREME Plus
DeepCool
V6000
Zalman
VF3000
Dimensions:
290(L) × 104(W) × 56(H)mm212.5(L) × 110.5(W) × 65(H)mm239(L) x 98(W) x 51(H)mm
Weight:622 grams
759 grams
430 grams
Fans:Three 92 mm fans
Two 92 mm Case Fans
Two 92 mm Fans
Power Cables:
Single Graphics Card
Fan Header
Two Motherboard
Fan Headers
Single Motherboard
Fan Header
Construction:Copper Cooling Block
Copper Heat Pipes
Aluminum Cooling Fins
All-Aluminum
Construction
Copper Cooling Block
Copper Heat Pipes
Aluminum Cooling Fins
Compatibility:Generic
Five compatibility set options:
VR001-Multiple Radeon/GeForce Cards
VR002-GeForce GTX 200 series
VR003-GeForce GTX 470/465
VR004-GeForce GTX 480
VR005-GeForce GTX 460
Generic
Six mounting hole size options:
43 mm, 51 mm, 53 mm,
58 mm, 61 mm, 80 mm
VF3000F: GeForce GTX 480
VF3000F: GeForce GTX 465/470
VF3000A: Radeon HD 5800 series
VF3000N: GeForce GTX 200 series
Display all 52 comments.
  • -1 Hide
    Poisoner , November 8, 2010 4:11 AM
    You just can't mess with the Accelero.
  • 6 Hide
    AMW1011 , November 8, 2010 4:30 AM
    Wow, I can't believe the Accelero and the Zalman were basically neck and neck, with no tangible victory in cooling. I always thought the Accelero would be better, but Zalman actually pulled this one off.

    However, what would be AMAZING, is to have a follow-up to see which of these two solutions work best in SLI, assuming EITHER work well in SLI. I think that is the big question, especially since we never expected bad temps.

    Also can you please add the voltages used for each overclock? It might give people, especially stock GTX 480 owners, a better idea of what these can handle, since cards will always vary when overclocking.

    Holy ***, stock voltages! That is crazy! Please post up your VID (stock voltage) for us. Either you have a golden GTX 480, or the VID is a lot higher than it needs to be, which is pretty common.

    Great article, I love to see these kind of side articles/reviews, and it was well done.
  • 0 Hide
    gabwerkz , November 8, 2010 5:53 AM
    You mean Zalman VF3000F, not Zotac VF3000F on page 7.
  • 0 Hide
    Nerdbox87 , November 8, 2010 6:21 AM
    Given that this entire article is based on cooling you really should have included all GPU temps - as vram / vrm cooling may be the difference between the Accelero and the Zalman (as I know my Accelero Twin Turbo on a 5850 struggled with vram temps in Furmark)

    On this my guess would be the Zalman would smash it
  • -1 Hide
    joytech22 , November 8, 2010 7:10 AM
    How was the 480 at just under 60C when my 470's are always idling at 86C in a Antec twelve hundred..?

    I mean sure this case isn't the best cooling case but there's never really much hot air in the case and with a sidepanel fan blowing on the two cards i just cant see how.

    Unless.. you guy's test in a cool room at about 15-20C or the fan speeds are maxed 100% of the time.
  • 1 Hide
    anacandor , November 8, 2010 7:16 AM
    joytech22my 470's are always idling at 86C


    Well, there's your praablem.

  • -1 Hide
    dvijaydev46 , November 8, 2010 7:51 AM
    Oh, Zalman's cooler looks weaker than Accelero but the later actually outperforms a bit. That's amazing.
  • 0 Hide
    Th-z , November 8, 2010 7:51 AM
    Don, what is your view on how to apply thermal paste. There are numbers of ways people talk about: a pea in the middle, several peas, line in the middle, several lines, and old school spread method. You use spread method when you apply the RAM/VRM sink on Zalman, I presume you use the same method on other parts, too. Maybe Tom can do a comparison test on different ways of applying thermal paste.
  • 0 Hide
    compton , November 8, 2010 8:12 AM
    These look good and would help me out quite a bit with a 465/470, but I wish I could get them in a design that would help maintain the existing footprint. My GF100 doesn't run quite as hot as some reference card designs, but that sure as hell doesn't mean that I'm happy with the leaf blower lurking in my case. Maybe I find a way to make the Zalman work.
  • 1 Hide
    avatar_raq , November 8, 2010 9:20 AM
    I think the Zalman one wins here. It performs slightly better, costs slightly less, weighs less and is shorter than the Arctic cooler. As for noise they're trading blows. Being shorter, the VF3000 does not increase the length of the GTX 480, unlike the accelero which may theoretically cause incompatibility with some cases. Being lighter, it strains the PCB much less. The fact it performed so close to the Arctic cooler with only 2 fans surprised me.
  • 1 Hide
    ares1214 , November 8, 2010 9:29 AM
    Is it a new habbit to NOT arrange them in order, just kinda throw them up there?
  • 1 Hide
    waynewarrior78 , November 8, 2010 9:34 AM
    Zalman VF3000F: My 2 cents...

    I have its twin brother for ATI. I must say its an amazing cooler. I use it with the stock heat plate on the 5850. I hit 1ghz easy and I prob could push it harder if I wanted. The best part is I can barely hear it even when its on full blast.
  • 0 Hide
    Draygonn , November 8, 2010 11:04 AM
    What are the fan speed %s at idle and at load?
  • -8 Hide
    nebun , November 8, 2010 11:13 AM
    my water cooling is way better idle 32c and load 50c
  • -5 Hide
    nebun , November 8, 2010 11:14 AM
    did i mention that i do not loose my sli capability, some mobos don't have the pci slots place to accommodate those air coolers
  • 0 Hide
    EXT64 , November 8, 2010 12:00 PM
    And how much did your full WC cost?

    It would have been nice if the TFII's cooler could have been tested too for comparison as it is only a dual rather than tri slot solution.
  • 0 Hide
    enzo matrix , November 8, 2010 1:35 PM
    joytech22How was the 480 at 65.8*C (you might want to try reading better) when my 470's are always idling at 86C in a Antec twelve hundred..?I mean sure this case isn't the best cooling case but there's never really much hot air in the case and with a sidepanel fan blowing on the two cards i just cant see how.Unless.. you guy's test in a cool room at about 15-20C or the fan speeds are maxed 100% of the time.

    60*C is the CHANGE VS AMBIENT. This means how much hotter it is vs the ambient temperature. Assuming a 20*C room, that means they hit 85.8*C on load.
  • 0 Hide
    bildo123 , November 8, 2010 1:40 PM
    Th-zDon, what is your view on how to apply thermal paste. There are numbers of ways people talk about: a pea in the middle, several peas, line in the middle, several lines, and old school spread method. You use spread method when you apply the RAM/VRM sink on Zalman, I presume you use the same method on other parts, too. Maybe Tom can do a comparison test on different ways of applying thermal paste.


    I used to to do the spread, but in comparison to the dot in the middle method, it's a PITA. And I remember one time I couldn't get a heat sink on properly and had to take it off, using the dot method, and it actually spread quite well. In either scenario I can't imagine the temperature vary by more than a couple degrees Celsius.
  • 0 Hide
    zcubed , November 8, 2010 2:04 PM
    The VF3000F is great. I got one for my GTX 470 which was idle at 44C and around 80-85C load. Then again I wasn't doing it any favors having overvolted it to 1.087v and clocks at 850/1700/1900. The stock fan was horribly loud and still getting very hot even without overclocking/volting so I got the Zalman and threw it on. 33C idle and 63C load with the fan at the lowest setting! Great job by Zalman and I managed to get the memory clock to 1975.
  • 0 Hide
    zcubed , November 8, 2010 2:09 PM
    Stock clocks for my GTX 470 are 607/1215/1674. So the gains are pretty good and the 70 for the Zalman VF3000F was well worth the decrease in temps and sound.
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