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Asus Chromebit CS10 Brings Chrome OS To Any Monitor Or TV

Asus announced the Chromebit CS10 (first announced back in March), which is an $85 USB drive-type PC that connects to a monitor or HDTV and can be paired to a Bluetooth keyboard to offer users a Chrome OS desktop experience.

On the hardware side, the device looks much like a USB drive, although it's slightly larger than most USB drives these days (12.3 cm long), and it weighs 75 grams. Earlier this year, Google and Asus announced the RK3288-C-powered Asus C201 Chromebook, which started out at $169. Now, Asus is using the same Rockchip processor to power the new $85 Chromebit, as well. The RK3288-C SoC uses quad-core 32-bit Cortex-A17 1.8 GHz CPU and a Mali-T764 GPU (a variant of Mali-T760).

The Chromebit CS10 comes with 2 GB of RAM, 16 GB of flash storage, an HDMI port for connecting to a monitor, dual-band 802.11ac 2×2 MIMO Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0, and a USB 2.0 port.

On the software side, we have Chrome OS, often called one of the most secure operating systems around thanks in part to security being a main priority from the beginning of its development, rather than an afterthought, but also because for the most part, Chrome OS only loads websites and web apps. Even the few Chrome apps using native code are securely sandboxed to minimize the damage.

Asus Chromebit CS10
Operating SystemChrome OS
ProcessorRockchip RK3288-C
Memory2 GB LPDDR3L
GraphicsIntegrated Rockchip Mali T764 (delivers Full HD 1080p visuals)
Storage16 GB eMMC storage
TPMYes
WirelessDual-band 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Bluetooth 4.0
Connectivity1 x HDMI 1 x USB 2.0 1 x DC-in
Power supply12V, 1.5A, 18W adapter
ColorsCacao Black, Tangerine Orange
Size123 x 31 x 17 mm
Weight75 g

Although in some cases and for some people, Chrome OS's simplicity is a hurdle for productivity; for others its simplicity is what makes it appealing compared to a more full-featured operating system. Users need to simply log in with their Google credentials, and all of their synced data from their browsers will transfer over to the new Chromebit.

The Chromebit also comes with 100 GB of free storage in Google Drive, which helps those who may need a little more than the 16 GB of onboard device storage.

The Chromebit will soon ship in the U.S., Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan and the UK.

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Lucian Armasu joined Tom’s Hardware in early 2014. He writes news stories on mobile, chipsets, security, privacy, and anything else that might be of interest to him from the technology world. Outside of Tom’s Hardware, he dreams of becoming an entrepreneur.

You can follow him at @lucian_armasu. Follow us on Facebook, Google+, RSS, Twitter and YouTube.

  • dstarr3
    It's amazing that these little finger-sized computer sticks are more powerful than the computer I replaced, like, three years ago.
    Reply
  • randomstar
    compare to intel compute stick? seeing similar devices for not much more with BT, x86 quad core, 32 gb storage and SD slot, etc , with windows 8/10 full os and office365..
    Reply
  • fixxxer113
    It's amazing that these little finger-sized computer sticks are more powerful than the computer I replaced, like, three years ago.

    Then you didn't have a very good computer :P
    Reply
  • ZolaIII
    It's on pair with Intel compute stick in performance (real usage like Web browsing). It's still better solution for Linux and Android & it can serve very well as Multimedia center thanks to very well support in Kodi. It can decently handle Android games. Pricing could have been & lower but still you get a lot bang for the bucks that is if you don't use it with Chrome OS.
    Reply
  • amk-aka-Phantom
    It's on pair with Intel compute stick in performance (real usage like Web browsing). It's still better solution for Linux and Android

    Why is it a better solution than the Compute Stick, which uses an x86 chip and therefore allows you to install all the main Linux distros and not just ones that have ARM builds?

    Then you didn't have a very good computer :p

    Word. Even an Atom netbook is more powerful than this.
    Reply
  • ZolaIII
    16969989 said:
    It's on pair with Intel compute stick in performance (real usage like Web browsing). It's still better solution for Linux and Android

    Why is it a better solution than the Compute Stick, which uses an x86 chip and therefore allows you to install all the main Linux distros and not just ones that have ARM builds?

    Then you didn't have a very good computer :p

    Word. Even an Atom netbook is more powerful than this.
    Well you will have only one or two Ubuntu builds with this rock chip to start with but for regular user that's enough. It's much more capable/supported for video decoding. Even open drivers for MALI are bad it's still better GPU (T760 MP4). On Android it wins in every way. On stick it will overheat & throttle much less as it's more efficient.

    At the end it's not slower than Atom at least for what it's intended to be used.
    http://www.omgchrome.com/asus-c201-chromebook-rockchip-benchmark-processor-benchmarks/
    & this whose before native NaCl suport for ARMv7.
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    16969194 said:
    It's amazing that these little finger-sized computer sticks are more powerful than the computer I replaced, like, three years ago.

    Then you didn't have a very good computer :P

    I did not. lol
    Reply
  • bliq
    Why is it a better solution than the Compute Stick, which uses an x86 chip and therefore allows you to install all the main Linux distros and not just ones that have ARM builds?
    What makes it better is that if ChromeOS meets your needs, its far lighter and will be more performant than full blown windows or linux. The key phrase being "if ChromeOS meets your needs", which applies to probably 95% of all computing needs and hence users. I've deployed ChromeOS pretty widey among my family and even for my needs, as a systems engineer for a cloud computing company, ChromeOS is sufficient for probably 80-90% of what I do (though I use a MBP for that last 20% due to not wanting to carry multiple devices).
    Reply
  • H2Yu
    Would be a good idea for old TV upgrades, at least, with YouTube in large screens is real wonderful!
    Reply