Skip to main content

Intel's Mobile Ivy Bridge CPU Line-up Revealed in New Leak

Over the past two weeks, we have learned about the upcoming Ivy Bridge processors and its "S" & "T" versions. Thanks to another leak, posted by VR-Zone, we now get to see a little about the upcoming Ivy Bridge mobile platform. The M-series will come with 35W, 45W, and 55W TDP. The U-Series will come with a 17W TDP. This is a change from the current Sandy Bridge mobile line up that offered three levels; SV - 35W, 45W & 55W, LV - 25W and ULV - 17W.

(Image credit: VR-Zone)

With the Chief River platform, Intel has added an additional chipset (HM76) to its lineup. The three main chipsets are HM75, HM76, and HM77, with the UM77 for lower power platform. With the HM76, users gain USB 3.0 support over HM75, while HM77 adds support for RAID, in addition to USB 3.0.

(Image credit: VR-Zone)

M-Series Processors:

(Image credit: VR-Zone)

Looking into the mobile CPU lineup, the flagship Ivy Bridge mobile CPU is the Core i7-3920XM. It has 4-cores (8-threads), clocked at 2.90 GHz with Max Turbo of 3.80 GHz (single-core), and Intel's HD Graphics 4000. The other quad-core CPUs are the Core i7-3820QM and Core i7-3720QM, which have 4-cores (8-threads). The Core i7-3820QM is clocked at 2.70 GHz, while the Core i7-3720QM is clocked at 2.60 GHz. These show a 400 MHz increase in clock speeds over the initially released Sandy Bridge counter-parts.

(Image credit: VR-Zone)

The rest of the M-Series lineup includes a dual-core Core i7-3520M, which is clocked at 2.90 GHz and two i5 dual-core models. The Core i5-3360M is clocked at 2.80 GHz, while the Core i5-3320M is clocked at 2.60 GHz. All the M-Series processors utilize Intel's HD Graphics 4000, SIPP 2012, vPro 2012, VT-d, TXT, AES-NI, and support DDR3 memory speeds of 1600MHz. It is interesting to see that all the mobile processors have a higher max graphics clocks versus their desktop equivalents (1300 vs 1150).

U-Series Processors:

(Image credit: VR-Zone)

The U-Series lineup will include two CPUs, the Core i7-3667U and Core i5-3427U. The Core i7-3667U has 2-cores (4 threads) and clocked at 2.00 GHz with Max Turbo of 3.20 GHz (single-core). The Core i5-3427U has has 2-cores (4 threads) and clocked at 1.80 GHz with Max Turbo of 2.80 GHz (single-core). All the U-Series processors utilize Intel's HD Graphics 4000, SIPP 2012, vPro 2012, VT-d, TXT, AES-NI, and support DDR3 memory speeds of 1600MHz.

(Image credit: VR-Zone)
  • pent5ht
    seems like IVY is more of a GPU increase......enthusiasts favor CPU perf. because they already have GPU's this is more for HP, etc prebuilt companies that wont need onbaord gpu.s
    Reply
  • Pyree
    Interesting. No i3.
    Reply
  • fyasko
    pent5htseems like IVY is more of a GPU increase......enthusiasts favor CPU perf. because they already have GPU's this is more for HP, etc prebuilt companies that wont need onbaord gpu.s
    ...or people who want lower TDP and less noise/heat, not to bash you but not everyone wants a huge "gaming rig" or workstation.
    Reply
  • nottheking
    Looking at these compared to the existing Sandy Bridge notebook CPUs, it would appear that all we're really seeing is a +200 MHz clock rate bump across the board; TDPs are otherwise the same for each segment, as are L2 cache and core-count figures. The only other difference is the HD 4000 graphics, which really don't mean all that much anyway. (especially to enthusiasts)

    I wonder how this will translate onto desktops: a 200 MHz bump will likely only be a mild improvement, and still keeps Intel well below the 4.0 GHz mark... Though from what I'd seen, Ivy Bridge will actually mean a TDP drop on desktop CPUs, even if it didn't for laptop ones. (i.e, the 95W for top-end non-extreme i5s and i7s would go to 65W)

    PyreeInteresting. No i3.The listed CPUs only seem to correspond to replacing the top one or two Sandy Bridge CPUs for each broad segment; there's almost certainly some i3s out there, as well as lower-clocked i5s and i7s.

    fyasko...or people who want lower TDP and less noise/heat, not to bash you but not everyone wants a huge "gaming rig" or workstation....Except that TDP actually *wasn't* dropped; I just compared the chart with those of Sandy Bridge ones; TDPs remain the same. This actually somewhat disappoints me, since Ivy Bridge promised to give lower TDPs for desktop CPUs... It just won't for mobile CPUs.
    Reply
  • uhhm, it allows motherboards to utulize pci E 3.0 and beter usage of ssd cache aswell.
    Its not a big increase from sandy, nor is the price. so just get one of these, i dont want to buy a sandy now, since i got 2 580 GTX in sli for graphics and a OC i7 -930, and console ports keep coming. next year april this will be a perfect upgrade, the PCI-e3 might mean super GPU's. maybe the graphics card limitations are gona nearly double to to the speed boost the companies get.

    Dont just always look at specs, features also play a big role. And since im into gaming and OCing, this CPU gives alot of improved features. also new Mobo Series aswell we might get some improved bios etc..

    you can only call it crap after release, like bulldog is crap. but beforehand it looked like major competition for intel, but when it was put to the test it was horrible. for its specs its horrible.
    Reply
  • nottheking
    fgdasd3f3uhhm, it allows motherboards to utulize pci E 3.0 and beter usage of ssd cache aswell.Its not a big increase from sandy, nor is the price.Well, I can see that the former might be of particular value to ultrabooks, but I honestly do have questions on the value of PCI-e 3.0 for laptops: it only really pays off with higher-end cards in a lower-end motherboard: the big difference only shows when you're, say, SLi'ing GTX 580s with a x8 slot for each. Given that mobile GPUs tend to be half the potency of their desktop brethren, this might be of a limited impact.
    Reply
  • ojas
    It is interesting to see that all the mobile processors have a higher max graphics clocks versus their desktop equivalents (1300 vs 1150).
    Probably because Intel realises that most desktop users who buy an Intel proc will use discrete graphics...for notebooks to use less power (by forfeiting an ext. GPU) while still remaining capable, they'd have to do this.

    notthekingExcept that TDP actually *wasn't* dropped; I just compared the chart with those of Sandy Bridge ones; TDPs remain the same. This actually somewhat disappoints me, since Ivy Bridge promised to give lower TDPs for desktop CPUs... It just won't for mobile CPUs.Well, in a way they have. Not in absolute numbers, but efficiency wise. I'm assuming the 17W procs will now pack as much punch as the earlier 25W ones, hence the 25W parts were pulled.
    And remember, these are average TDP values. Maybe the maximum power draw is closer to the average TDP now? Or idle mode wattage will be lower?
    Plus you have to consider that this TDP value includes the IGP. So yeah, performance/watt has gone up, even if the TDP is the same.
    Reply
  • nottheking
    ojasNot in absolute numbers, but efficiency wise. I'm assuming the 17W procs will now pack as much punch as the earlier 25W ones, hence the 25W parts were pulled.And remember, these are average TDP values. Maybe the maximum power draw is closer to the average TDP now? Or idle mode wattage will be lower?Plus you have to consider that this TDP value includes the IGP. So yeah, performance/watt has gone up, even if the TDP is the same.Yes, efficiency's defeinitely improved, but it's been more a marginal increase rather than a distinct step increase. As I'd mentioned, the highest end of each segment was basically bumped by 200 MHz; so that means that they were able to squeeze that extra speed without a TDP increase. It's not a huge increase, though; and of course, the old Sandy Bridge chips also had the HD 3000.

    To put it into perspective, we'd have to look at the best Intel offered with each core at each TDP point: while TDPs are more of a "limit," the highest-end ones generally would be all comparable:

    55W - SB: 4C 2.7/3.7 GHz CPU, 650/1.3 GHz MHz GPU, 8MB L3. IB: 4C 2.9/3.8 GHz CPU, 650 MHz/1.3 GHz GPU, 8MB L3.
    45W - SB: 4C 2.4/3.6 GHz CPU, 650/1.3 GHz MHz GPU, 6MB L3. IB: 4C 2.7/3.7 GHz CPU, 650 MHz/1.25 GHz GPU, 6MB L3.
    35W i7 - SB: 2C 2.8/3.5 GHz CPU, 650 MHz/1.3 GHz GPU, 4MB L3. IB: 2C 2.9/3.6 GHz CPU, 650 MHz/1.25 GHz GPU, 4MB L3.
    35W i5 - SB: 2C 2.6/3.3 GHz CPU, 650 MHz/1.3 GHz GPU, 3MB L3. IB: 2C 2.8/3.5 GHz CPU, 650 MHz/1.2 GHz GPU, 3MB L3.

    All other specs are essentially the same, barring the change between the HD 3000 and HD 4000, the PCI-e 3.0 support, and the improved SSD support. I noticed that the Turbo frequency for the GPU, though, is actually LOWER below the high-end i7s on Ivy Bridge. In the end, the IBs are more efficient than the SBs, but it's only a small evolutionary step, and perhaps less than expected from a full-on die shrink from 32nm to 22nm.
    Reply
  • billybobser
    Having a competitive gpu on die makes sense to me, as the mass market is non enthusiast (as people point out every day). It gives oem's a cheaper/much better option and in doing so, is trying to compete in a sector that AMD is doing really well in.

    Would be nice if the GPU could be used (effectively) in conjuction with a discreet card so it would be of use to every market sector, though I guess this is unlikely. As it will be expensive to get right, and there's probably no money in getting it right.
    Reply
  • ksampanna
    You don't have to deliver huge jumps in mobile processors' performance. It's not like we buy them for Folding@Home. Performance similar to the current generation is acceptable, just give it to me at a lower TDP. I'm definitely in favour of the increased battery life.
    Reply