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U.S. 'Six Strikes' Internet Warning System Ready This Year

By - Source: ArsTechnica | B 40 comments
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Center for Copyright Information says its more an educational system than a strike system.

France made headlines when it introduced its controversial three strikes law in 2009. The law, dubbed HADOPI, placed a significant amount of responsibility on ISPs, requiring that they issue three warnings to subscribers after receiving a complaint from a copyright holder. The first warning would be in the form of an email, while the second would be a certified letter. Continuing offenders may have their internet access suspended for up to a year. The French government has reportedly only had mixed success with HADOPI, but the U.S. is still on track to introduce a similar system very soon.

ArsTechnica reports that the Center for Copyright Information (CCI) plans to introduce a six-stage warning scheme for alleged online copyright infringers. Referred to as 'The Copyright Alert System' the six-stage scheme was supposed to be in place by the end of December of last year. This date was then pushed to July 2012. However, as you may have noticed, we're now well into September and we haven't seen hide nor hair of a six-strike system being introduced. In case you thought this meant the whole thing had been scrapped, CCI head, Jill Lesser, insists that it's still very much on the cards. In fact, it's on schedule for a 2012 launch. Lesser also disputed the use of the word 'strike' with regard to the warnings ISPs will send to users. Lesser highlighted the fact that 'strike' has punitive connotations and that this new program is aimed at educating internet users as opposed to punishing them. For this reason, CCI thinks of it more as an educational tool than a strikes program.

So how will the whole thing work? The first alert users will get is an email advising them that their account may have been misused or involved in copyright infringement. This alert will guide users toward material to help them check the security of their network as well as information on legal sources of music and TV. The second alert is similar to the first but will "underscore the educational message." If infringement persists, a third online alert will be sent. Appearing similar to the first two, this alert will differ in that it will have a click-through box that will force users to acknowledge receipt of the warning. The fourth warning will also come via email and feature the same 'acknowledgement of receipt' requirement. Alert number five brings the chance of some 'Mitigation Measures.' These may include temporary reductions of internet speeds, redirection to a landing page until the subscriber contacts the ISP to discuss the matter, or reviews and responds to some educational information about copyright. Alert number six brings yet more 'Mitigation Measures,' and Lesser says ISPs will make the decision about cutting off internet access.

Lesser didn't say exactly when we can expect this new system, which was agreed upon by CCI, major U.S. ISPs and music and film representatives, but she's confident it will be ready before the end of 2012. With Mitigation Measures decided by the ISPs, we'll have to wait for their policies to be published before we know the answers to questions relating to throttling and the possible disconnection of internet service. We'll keep you posted.

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Top Comments
  • 32 Hide
    lahawzel , September 12, 2012 4:10 PM
    Soon, pirates begin the trivial task of using proxies and VPNs, and this six-strike system will fail spectacularly at catching prolific infringers, leaving only inexperienced users who Googled "free music download" or "free <insert sport event> stream" to be caught by the mess.

    Meanwhile, college students across the nation continue to receive mail from the RIAA stating "We know. Pay us $750 per song via credit card or we will sue you."

    USA! USA! USA!

    :pt1cable: 
  • 18 Hide
    nullifier , September 12, 2012 4:32 PM
    LaHawzelSoon, pirates begin the trivial task of using proxies and VPNs, and this six-strike system will fail spectacularly at catching prolific infringers, leaving only inexperienced users who Googled "free music download" or "free stream" to be caught by the mess. Meanwhile, college students across the nation continue to receive mail from the RIAA stating "We know. Pay us $750 per song via credit card or we will sue you."USA! USA! USA!


    ^ This, onion routing and VPNs have and will defeat this system miserably. This will only succeed to fry the small fish in the pirate sea.

    I second the chant: USA! USA! USA!
  • 17 Hide
    COLGeek , September 12, 2012 4:33 PM
    This will not hold up to a legal challenge and will result in an epic fail. Waste of time and energy. Next.
Other Comments
    Display all 40 comments.
  • 32 Hide
    lahawzel , September 12, 2012 4:10 PM
    Soon, pirates begin the trivial task of using proxies and VPNs, and this six-strike system will fail spectacularly at catching prolific infringers, leaving only inexperienced users who Googled "free music download" or "free <insert sport event> stream" to be caught by the mess.

    Meanwhile, college students across the nation continue to receive mail from the RIAA stating "We know. Pay us $750 per song via credit card or we will sue you."

    USA! USA! USA!

    :pt1cable: 
  • 17 Hide
    igot1forya , September 12, 2012 4:13 PM
    Who's up for a private Darknet? Anyone?
  • 16 Hide
    DroKing , September 12, 2012 4:19 PM
    This is sickening.
  • 13 Hide
    joemcjoe , September 12, 2012 4:25 PM
    igot1foryaWho's up for a private Darknet? Anyone?

    sure why not
  • 18 Hide
    nullifier , September 12, 2012 4:32 PM
    LaHawzelSoon, pirates begin the trivial task of using proxies and VPNs, and this six-strike system will fail spectacularly at catching prolific infringers, leaving only inexperienced users who Googled "free music download" or "free stream" to be caught by the mess. Meanwhile, college students across the nation continue to receive mail from the RIAA stating "We know. Pay us $750 per song via credit card or we will sue you."USA! USA! USA!


    ^ This, onion routing and VPNs have and will defeat this system miserably. This will only succeed to fry the small fish in the pirate sea.

    I second the chant: USA! USA! USA!
  • 17 Hide
    COLGeek , September 12, 2012 4:33 PM
    This will not hold up to a legal challenge and will result in an epic fail. Waste of time and energy. Next.
  • 7 Hide
    ryu750 , September 12, 2012 4:34 PM
    this is funny...LaHawzel hit it, right on the head.
  • 7 Hide
    thecolorblue , September 12, 2012 4:37 PM
    USA! USA! USA!
  • 7 Hide
    KelvinTy , September 12, 2012 4:41 PM
    They will need "solid" proof of you pirating which already means invading your privacy with traffic analyzing software(s). But wait, what if you use outgoing encryption utilities? If they attempt to break it, wouldn't it be a lot more concerning? Conspiracy theory, I call...
  • 6 Hide
    jellico , September 12, 2012 4:41 PM
    igot1foryaWho's up for a private Darknet? Anyone?

    Hell, you don't even need private darknet to defeat this. A proxy/anonymizer or a public darknet will do just fine. Off the top of my head:

    http://www.freenetproject.org
    http://www.hidemyass.com
  • 16 Hide
    wavetrex , September 12, 2012 4:41 PM
    Welcome to Nazi North America. Enjoy your stay!
  • 7 Hide
    K2N hater , September 12, 2012 5:40 PM
    igot1foryaWho's up for a private Darknet? Anyone?

    They're sure to make it illegal as well.... It's only a matter of time.

    Remember in the Nazi Germany the ones who were first sent to working camps were the (already few) opposers of Hitler...
  • 4 Hide
    jacobm95 , September 12, 2012 5:45 PM
    What about amendment number 4?

    And does know one in the government realize that people who pirate, no they are pirating? This "education" belief that the 6 strike system will instill fear into those who pirate is just going to fail utterly.

    In all honesty the piraters will just improvise, adapt and overcome, like humans have been doing since the dawn of man.


    vpn, vpn, vpn proxy, this sytem of "6 strikes will fail" though it might get the less knowledgable of the population who don't know about anonomitty

    Sorry for my speling mistakes.
  • 9 Hide
    JoeMomma , September 12, 2012 5:59 PM
    I know someone that got a certified letter signed by 6 of NBC/Universal's lawyers saying 'We know you downloaded our movie, next time we catch you we will sue for thousands.' Did that stop him? No.

    He told me that ISP's can not really tell what you are downloading.
    But uploading a lot of data gets their attention.
    Now he doesn't seed the torrents he downloads.
    Problem solved.
  • 1 Hide
    mesab66 , September 12, 2012 6:00 PM
    "Soon, pirates begin the trivial task of using proxies and VPNs, "

    And what will the VPN companies do if they get a letter requesting them, by international law, to contact the end user? Do you honestly think they will allow potential 'criminal acts' to continue in public for any length of time? Although you get a different IP address that may point to anywhere in the world, that IP address will always be traceable back to the VPN provider, and therin lies the problem with all VPN's.

    For an interesting read regarding standard/public VPN's, check out:-

    http://forums.newsbin.com/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=29170

    Do you want more convincing? ok then.....how about "LulzSec Suspect Learns Even HideMyAss.com Has Limits":-

    http://www.informationweek.com/security/privacy/lulzsec-suspect-learns-even-hidemyasscom/231602248




  • -1 Hide
    DRosencraft , September 12, 2012 6:02 PM
    My only question is how much information about you this plan will gather. Other than that, it's not a huge deal. Whatever you may think, pirating is illegal. Receiving stolen goods is illegal. Technically they don't even need to give you six strikes, they could just track you down and haul you off to jail, let the legal system deal with you. This should also put an end to anyone who claims they didn't know they were pirating since by strike four it would just be willful ignorance on the part of the individual. Keep in mind that anyone actively circumventing these measures will likely be pilling on evidence against themselves if they're ever caught. Like I said, I do have some privacy concerns, but it so far doesn't sound like something ISPs are unable to do right now if they wanted, which is another problem entirely.
  • 2 Hide
    JamesSneed , September 12, 2012 6:05 PM
    What about IP spoofing? I can see hacker groups doing things like causing millions of IP's to show up on the auditing RIAA uses to report these offenses. That or hand picking IP's to spoof targets like RIAA lawyers. I'm not suggesting either but it seems this law will make it very easy for hackers to hassle people and/or force an internet connection to be disrupted by the ISP.
  • 2 Hide
    ahnilated , September 12, 2012 6:15 PM
    Well they would just have to encrypt the file good enough to make it so it can't be broken for 7 yrs when the statue of limitations comes into play.
  • 6 Hide
    gwwerner , September 12, 2012 6:43 PM
    So how is this going to work when you have 50+ college students using the same internet connection? Most apartment managers won't be able to figure out who is doing the downloading, and cutting off the internet for students in the middle of the semester is not going to go over well.
  • 9 Hide
    A Bad Day , September 12, 2012 6:58 PM
    Hijacking unsecured or WEP secured WiFi, exploiting public WiFi.

    Oh, dear.
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