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The SSD: Samsung 470-Series (MZ-SPA256, 256 GB)

How Do SSDs Redefine Storage Performance?
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Samsung’s 470-series family is the first to implement toggle-mode NAND flash memory that transfers data on the rising and the falling edge of each clock signal, effectively doubling interface bandwidth. As many of you know from memory history, the introduction of DDR SDRAM did almost double memory performance. However, the leap in theoretical performance translated into smaller real-life benefits. Expect something similar to happen with toggle-mode flash products.

The new drives are available in 64, 128, and 256 GB capacities, and they’re rated at 250 MB/s sequential read performance and 220 MB/s for sequential writes. Samsung points at the fact that the height of the device was reduced from 9.5 mm to only 7 mm. In high-density scenarios, this can result in an increase of storage.

Samsung’s controller is a multi-core unit, although we don’t have any additional information about it. The architecture is based on a dedicated DRAM buffer utilized for wear leveling. A 1.5 million-hour MTBF and a three-year warranty are comforting in the consumer space, but practically a minimum requirement for business products.

Samsung’s MSRPs are $699, $399, and $199 for the 256, 128, and 64 GB models, respectively. We already looked at specific performance results and power consumption in our latest SSD roundup.

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  • 17 Hide
    N.Broekhuijsen , November 16, 2010 6:18 AM
    yes but you forgot to consider that
    2 SSDs: 2*699= $1398
    8 HDDs: 8*300= $2400

    Seems pretty clear to me now!

    Aside from that, Really interesting article, really enjoyed reading it! Editors, give these guys a raise!
Other Comments
  • 0 Hide
    wickedsnow , November 16, 2010 5:35 AM
    Just wow.
  • 17 Hide
    N.Broekhuijsen , November 16, 2010 6:18 AM
    yes but you forgot to consider that
    2 SSDs: 2*699= $1398
    8 HDDs: 8*300= $2400

    Seems pretty clear to me now!

    Aside from that, Really interesting article, really enjoyed reading it! Editors, give these guys a raise!
  • 2 Hide
    Emperus , November 16, 2010 6:32 AM
    It has been evident since the very launch of the SSD's that they are the performance kings and mechanical hard drives are a no match compared to them.. However, data redundancy is a critical factor along with the cost per gb.. Power factors can be sidelined for sometime as even the fast mechanical hard drives don't consume that much of power.. SSD's do have the noise advantage though.. So, for the time being, it looks like both solutions will co exist until when SSD's completely take over.. Its all a matter of pricing for now.. A 500GB SSD at half the price of the current existing 250GB model will surely shift all the market in their favour (desktops + servers/workstations)..
  • 0 Hide
    lashabane , November 16, 2010 7:19 AM
    Quote:
    ...because no hard drive maker wanted to provide drives once we told them what we were planning.

    Like kids in a tree house.
  • 7 Hide
    rantoc , November 16, 2010 7:19 AM
    HDD for fileserver/backup - SSD for the rest, thats how i manage my data and it works very well.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , November 16, 2010 7:35 AM
    One for OS & one for high use apps the rest on HDD.
    Getting rid of my power sucking heat producing gas turbine loud raid array as soon as the store opens.
    Oh yeahhhhhhhhhh.
  • 3 Hide
    Darkerson , November 16, 2010 7:38 AM
    Would have been neat to see the Seagate Momentus XT hybrid drives tested. I know I blasted Seagate in one of the previous articles on here, but that doesnt mean Im not contemplating getting 2 of the XT's for a raid setup. I just wish they would put more options out, like drives with varyingly increasing amounts of flash inside, such as 8GB, 16GB, and maybe even 32GB. That way you still have a decent amount of platter storage, but a nice little turbo boost via the SSD part of the drive.
    Ok, got a little off topic there, sorry.
    Anyway, it was an all round interesting article none-the-less.
  • 0 Hide
    aaron88_7 , November 16, 2010 8:07 AM
    I might be missing something as I don't own an SSD drive and probably won't for some time, but I was under the impression that even with TRIM implemented SSD drives are not best to be used as drives you frequently write to as writing and re-writing effects overall performance over time.

    I'm just looking at the servers at my work and thinking to myself how expensive it would be if they were using SSDs and having to replace them over time because after being written and re-written over and over their performance decays to the point that they are no longer usable.
  • 0 Hide
    aaron88_7 , November 16, 2010 8:19 AM
    That is if we are talking about enterprise servers of course, for a home server I guess SSDs could be a viable option, but I just don't understand how these are really practical for a large business considering how expensive SSD drives are and their short life span with being written to so frequently in a large business.

    Again, I could be missing something here...
  • 6 Hide
    N.Broekhuijsen , November 16, 2010 8:27 AM
    Anone12312xbeater:yes but you forgot to consider that2 SSDs: 2*699= $13988 HDDs: 8*300= $2400==============================wow where did u get your HDD's. I can pick one up for ~130 which = 2TB..

    Did you even read the article?? They are talking about Enterprise Class drives, not your typical Desktop drive!
    Quote:
    than $300 for a very fast 15 000 RPM, 300 GB SAS hard drive
    ^ At the very end of the article!
  • -4 Hide
    jamesedgeuk2000 , November 16, 2010 8:45 AM
    Quote:
    From a cost point of view, $699 for a high-end 256 GB SSD is still a lot compared to less than $300 for a very fast 15 000 RPM, 300 GB SAS hard drive. But $399 is reasonable for such a fast 128 GB SSD.


    WTF?!?! Your comparing enterprise level HDD's to home user SSD's here!!!!!

    A 128GB SLC SSD will run you £819 ($1,312), MLC based SSD's are just not good enough for enterprise storage use due to their limited lifespan which is fine for a home PC but they would be dead in less than 6 months in an enterprise database server.

    Great misleading article, I hear next week you bring us the shock revelation that the Toyota Prius is more economic than the Ford Mustang and therefore a much better car for racing... >.>
  • 0 Hide
    Sihastru , November 16, 2010 10:26 AM
    When a Mustang does 170MPH and that magical Prius will do 220MPH, yes, the Prius would be a better car for racing. Not as cool looking, but it's racing.
  • 2 Hide
    arkadi , November 16, 2010 11:03 AM
    We all can see that storage technology shifting some ware....but for most users GB/Cost is one of the important factors...Ware I/O is a factor SSD is the way to go....In all other cases i think not. Good article with expected outcome...cant see the point sry :) 
  • 1 Hide
    K2N hater , November 16, 2010 11:10 AM
    jamesedgeuk2000WTF?!?! Your comparing enterprise level HDD's to home user SSD's here!!!!!A 128GB SLC SSD will run you £819 ($1,312), MLC based SSD's are just not good enough for enterprise storage use due to their limited lifespan which is fine for a home PC but they would be dead in less than 6 months in an enterprise database server.

    The reliability part can be fixed with hot-swap trays, RAID-5/RAID-6 and hot spares. What can't be fixed is the cost over time, as you pointed out.
  • 0 Hide
    nebun , November 16, 2010 11:12 AM
    why didn't they use the new ssd from crucial? they are wayyyy faster
  • 0 Hide
    huron , November 16, 2010 11:20 AM
    Very interesting article. I've started to see more SAN vendors putting in SSDs for those who absolutely must have performance - sure they're expensive, but you just tier the data, so the necessary stuff is in Tier 1 and the rest falls to Tier 2 and beyond...very cool.

    Nice article again...
  • 1 Hide
    HavoCnMe , November 16, 2010 1:53 PM
    Damn! I want to see 3 or 4 of those SSD's in RAID0.
  • -4 Hide
    wolfram23 , November 16, 2010 2:00 PM
    I
  • 1 Hide
    gallidorn , November 16, 2010 2:43 PM
    I'd like to see a review of Hybrid Hard Drives (HDD w/ 4gb SSD combo) compared to home user sata hard drives. This would be a more practical article, since the majority of people reading these articles do not have enterprise level hard drives in their computers.

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