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OCZ Intros RevoDrive 3 and X2 PCI-E SSDs

Wednesday OCZ launched its new "workstation class" RevoDrive 3 and RevoDrive 3 X2 lineup of PCI Express-based SSDs. These "drives" offer users monster performance, designed with the company's proprietary Virtualized Controller Architecture (VCA) technology to deliver maximum throughput in multithreaded applications.

"OCZ RevoDrive 3 PCIe SSDs use our VCA 2.0 technology to deliver superior performance and functionality for everything from scientific computing to high availability clustering," said Daryl Lang, Vice President of Product Management of OCZ Technology. "This exciting new workstation-class storage product accelerates application performance and takes full advantage of today's multithreaded processors and software, providing customers with greater throughput in an easy-to-deploy, single card solution."

According to the specs, the RevoDrive 3 provides sequential read and write speeds of up to 1 GB/s and up to 925 MB/s respectively, and random write (4K) performance of up to 130,000 IOPS. The specs of the RevoDrive 3 X2 are a bit meatier, with sequential read and write speeds of up to 1.5 GB/s and up to 1.25 GB/s respectively, and random write (4K) performance of up to 230,000 IOPS. Both models arrive in 240 and 480 GB capacities, but the RevoDrive 3 X2 also sports an additional 960 GB model.

So far the drives aren't available on the OCZ website or listed on online vendors like Amazon and Newegg, but you can check out our preview of the RevoDrive 3 X2 by heading here until the products finally go live. "The RevoDrive 3 X2 continues OCZ's tradition of delivering innovative technology able to serve up blistering performance to enthusiasts," Andrew said in his hands-on article. "It's not a business-class product. It's for the power user who is able to tax it using the right workload. If you're not one of those folks, the RevoDrive 3 X2 is seriously overkill."

Pricing for the X2 version includes $699.99 for the 240 GB model, $1699.99 for the 480 GB model, and an insane (but justified) $3199.99 for the 960 GB model.

  • DjEaZy
    ... so what is next... ?
    Reply
  • schwiing
    I wonder what would happen if you put this SSD to 88mph
    Reply
  • Pyree
    ^+1 razorburn. If money is not a problem, get several and raid0 it.
    Reply
  • x3style
    razorburnAnother great addition to any Ultimate Gaming PC Builds..It would not make any sense to use it for a gaming rig.
    Graphic stations that are used to process uncompressed video, Database servers.
    Reply
  • Yes, but can it run Crysis?
    Reply
  • memadmax
    I'm gonna get one of these things so that my monitor will melt when I boot up windows =D
    Reply
  • memadmax
    Yea, actually this is prolly not too useful for a gaming rig. Once you get a game loaded up in 8.1 jigawatts, in most cases the game is hard drive idle, if you have the ram. But I don't see too many people running 512 megs of ram then throwing one of these things at their system just to speed up the swap file....

    No, these cards would be very very useful in a busy database/web/file server.
    Reply
  • palladin9479
    Depends on the games you play. RPG's like Elder Scrolls and Fallout 3 could indeed use this card. These games data resources are in the 8GB+ range, and with the 1.8GB application memory limitation on 32-bit systems they must frequently load data from disk and hope windows filesystem caching picks up on it. If the application comes with a 64-bit executable then it can access a much larger application memory space, but it still must load all that data off the disk, and even then newer games have more resource data then you have available memory.

    So basically, for console level ports this card is overkill, for PC titles then it's made of win.
    Reply
  • drwho1
    now just wait a few years for the 960GB to drop to $50 bucks :)
    Reply
  • thebigt42
    I am waiting for the RevoDrive hybrid speed and capacity
    Reply