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Framework Adds Specs, Opens Pre-Orders for Repairable Notebook

Framework Laptop
(Image credit: Framework)

Framework, which announced its modular, repairable laptop back in February, now has full specs, pricing and is opening pre-orders for the machine on its website. It will come in three configurations, starting at $999.

That base model has an Intel Core i5-1135G7 processor, 8GB of DDR4 RAM, a 256GB NVMe, Wi-Fi 6 and will run Windows 10 Home. A $1,399 performance configuration bumps the processor up to an i7-1165G7 and doubles the RAM and storage to 16GB and 512GB, respectively. A professional model, starting at $1,999, has an i7-1185G7, 32GB of RAM, a 1TB SSD, support for vPro and runs Windows 10 Pro.

There will also be a DIY edition, starting at $749 barebones, that you build yourself from a kit and customize with parts and modules.

Each laptop will also have a 3:2, 2256 x 1504 display, 1080p webcam with a privacy switch, a 55Wh battery and a keyboard with 1.5 mm of key travel, all features you might find in one of the best ultrabooks. The entire motherboard is replaceable to allow upgrades to future generations of processors, which are typically soldered to the board on laptops.

Pre-orders are starting today in the United States, and Canada will come soon, with Asia and Europe coming before the end of the year. 

But like most tech companies, Framework hasn't been immune to supply chain issues, which it says will "limit the number of Framework Laptops we have available at launch." The company will take its pre-orders in small batches to ensure it can fulfill orders. The first batch, Framework says, will ship in July, with more to come. A pre-order requires a $100 refundable deposit, and the balance will be paid when it's ready to ship.

While the Framework Laptop sounds promising on paper, other small computer vendors have faced issues with fulfillment. Eve Devices, for instance, had issues fulfilling its Eve V, and some potential buyers have proven far more cautious around its Spectrum monitor and second-gen convertible. But Framework is acknowledging the difficulty in sourcing parts right now, so at least it's being straightforward there.

Andrew E. Freedman

Andrew E. Freedman is a senior editor at Tom's Hardware focusing on laptops, desktops and gaming as well as keeping up with the latest news. He holds a M.S. in Journalism (Digital Media) from Columbia University. A lover of all things gaming and tech, his previous work has shown up in Kotaku, PCMag, Complex, Tom's Guide and Laptop Mag among others.

  • kaalus
    Interesting how the article focuses solely on what CPU will be in the laptop: i5-1135G7 or i7-1185G7 and whether it will have 8GB or 16GB or RAM. Is there any way the user can notice the difference without running CPU-Z or some other artificial benchmark? No.

    However, screen resolution, screen size, quality of keyboard and touchpad, and most of all, the noise the cooling system makes under load - these are factors that any healthy human will notice instantly. Focus on them, not on irrelevant stuff like the CPU and memory.
    Reply
  • Raistlin81
    Yes, it would be nice to know more about the specs of the chassis, how does it handle ports, will it only be compatible with motherboards framework produce, are all the specs open so that third parties will produce parts. Lots of information missing, hope toms get one in to do a bit of testing.
    Reply
  • jkhoward
    Why did tech journalist stop linking to the damn product they’re reviewing.. like holy moly. Give me a link!
    Reply
  • escksu
    Repairable??? You meant laptops today aren't repairable so you need to have special version?? The like of DEll and Lenovo are fully repairable and many are upgradeable. Of course, upgrade means RAM and SSD.

    The parts are secured by screws which can be removed.....
    Reply
  • jasonkaler
    escksu said:
    Repairable??? You meant laptops today aren't repairable so you need to have special version?? The like of DEll and Lenovo are fully repairable and many are upgradeable. Of course, upgrade means RAM and SSD.

    The parts are secured by screws which can be removed.....
    try getting an macbook repaired. If a single connector comes loose, they charge you the full price of a new unit to get it fixed. It's so bad that countries are creating "right to repair" laws.
    Most normal laptops though, especially the cheaper ones have many bga components. You can't replace the cpu and several other things.
    Reply
  • ginthegit
    Its always the same nonsense. Laptops are already repairable, the only things that you can't change are soldered on components. Many CPUs like my old MSi Cx41 that I still use now I can find better CPUs on the same slot format and slot them in. MXM graphics slots have been around for ages too, so as long as the system connetor can supply enough power, then you are fine. RAM, My CX41 has 8Gig and can also also go up further with DDR3. If one of the daughter board peripherals isnt working, I can chage the board through ebay, and finally they have Legit expansion ports. This is old news. Ive changed most components on my Cx41 so this whole article is moot... I currently have my CX41 connected to a large monitor through its side port, but I also have a USB 3 connector that can connect to HDMi if needed, so I can drive the main TV in the house with it.

    What they mean to say, is they have given easy access to certain limited modules, and its almost fool proof... Ive been fixing and changing out components on my laptop for years.
    Reply
  • ginthegit
    jasonkaler said:
    try getting an macbook repaired. If a single connector comes loose, they charge you the full price of a new unit to get it fixed. It's so bad that countries are creating "right to repair" laws.
    Most normal laptops though, especially the cheaper ones have many bga components. You can't replace the cpu and several other things.

    It is true, already soldered components are impossible to change. My Wifes Macbook is out of warrantee and I repair it myself. Its not broken even after 7 years, so never had to try.

    "Right to repair" laws are just another left wing addition to the control of cost and control of money flow to their friends. Learn how to fix what you buy, you'll save yourself a fortune.
    Reply
  • Krotow
    ginthegit said:
    It is true, already soldered components are impossible to change. My Wifes Macbook is out of warrantee and I repair it myself. Its not broken even after 7 years, so never had to try.

    "Right to repair" laws are just another left wing addition to the control of cost and control of money flow to their friends. Learn how to fix what you buy, you'll save yourself a fortune.

    BS and BS. Yes, not replaceable for average Joe without microsoldering skills and proper equipment. But fixable in repair shop who have proper equipment for SMD and BGA soldering and rework. Check Louis Rossmann repair videos in YouTube for example. And repair often will cost a small fraction of device price. Main issue is impossibility to order several proprietary chips like board controllers, power regulators, Apple T2 etc. And access to board views and circuit diagrams even for money.

    "Right to repair" laws are left wing conspiracy? What a BS!

    By the way no one would complain about Apple if they would ask only fair price for repaired part + work in authorized service. But asking full device price to replace only broken screen is ransom. Also dubious attitude to customers, pretending to repair a device when in reality cold soldering is "fixed" with tucking a rubber pad under motherboard.
    Reply
  • ginthegit
    Krotow said:
    BS and BS. Yes, not replaceable for average Joe without microsoldering skills and proper equipment. But fixable in repair shop who have proper equipment for SMD and BGA soldering and rework. Check Louis Rossmann repair videos in YouTube for example. And repair often will cost a small fraction of device price. Main issue is impossibility to order several proprietary chips like board controllers, power regulators, Apple T2 etc. And access to board views and circuit diagrams even for money.

    "Right to repair" laws are left wing conspiracy? What a BS!

    By the way no one would complain about Apple if they would ask only fair price for repaired part + work in authorized service. But asking full device price to replace only broken screen is ransom. Also dubious attitude to customers, pretending to repair a device when in reality cold soldering is "fixed" with tucking a rubber pad under motherboard.

    Eye roll. So you call a boudary pin device a Ball grid array. What nonsense are you talking. These chips are easy to solder onto the board. I can do that, I am a traing Electronics Engineer with speciality Irons.

    Are you trying to tell me he can fix a Ball Grid Array Chip, Really. Why do you guys even comment on these forums, seriously why.... Look up what a "Ball Grid Array" is and then repeat after me " I will not talk nonsense on Tomshardare any more, Because I dont understand chip connectors!"

    https://blog.matric.com/hs-fs/hubfs/ball%20grid%20array%20in%20PCB.png?width=600&name=ball%20grid%20array%20in%20PCB.png
    I would love to see Louis Rossman Unsolder this connection type and put it back on... Lol you nut case!

    Why Why Why!!! Why do you nuggets even bother posting when you have no knowledge about something... You watch a video and you think you know it all. The comment on BGA is not a mere power chip, its a 500+ pin CPU with Pins all under the Chip.

    "Right to repair laws" are all over the comany product too. If you tamper with the case of a product and break a sticker, you also break policy and they have the right by law to turn you product away even under warantee. Good grief!

    Your last point is the only valid point you made here. And this is why I said that I repair all my own stuff, Including simple chips like Rossman did. But BGAs... even Luois would smack your head for suggesting he could to this.
    Reply
  • Krotow
    ginthegit said:
    Are you trying to tell me he can fix a Ball Grid Array Chip, Really. Why do you guys even comment on these forums, seriously why.... Look up what a "Ball Grid Array" is and then repeat after me " I will not talk nonsense on Tomshardare any more, Because I dont understand chip connectors!"

    And you can't comprehend the diference between BGA chip replacing and repairing? Repair a chip - who would think about that?
    Reply