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2013 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track: Telematics And Infotainment

Hyundai’s navigation system is fairly standard, including the usual points of interest and traffic data from SiriusXM. Hyundai Mobis handles all map updates, but sources its map data from Navteq, now owned by Nokia. The maps are flat 2D representations, and they're not as fancy as the latest 3D maps with topography data used by Ford and Audi. Nevertheless, they get the job done. We didn’t run into any issues with the mapping software; it works as advertised, but didn't offer anything we hadn't seen before.

SiriusXM traffic data is incorporated into the navigation software. When traffic is anticipated along the route you're current on, the software presents an option to detour around the bottleneck The most palpable downside is that you always have to have a configured destination in order for the navigation system to know where you're heading.

During our time with the 2013 Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track, we discovered that Hyundai's navigation system just loved to ask if we'd like to take a detour, and then failed to present a viable option for avoiding rush-hour traffic in Washington state or quicker routes in the traffic hell that is Portland, Oregon.

Voice Recognition

Hyundai employs a Nuance-based speech recognition system to interface with its infotainment system. In testing, the system had no trouble searching through our phone book to find Chris Angelini, Tom's Hardware's editor-in-chief, or entering trip destinations.

The voice recognition is accurate. However, it's not the most responsive solution we've used, and there is noticeable lag between spoken command and system acknowledgement.

If you use voice recognition to call Blue Link services, you're actually utilizing Vlingo's cloud-based services (interestingly, now owned by Nuance). We had no issues getting the Blue Link services to recognize our requests to share our location via Facebook.

Phone Connectivity

Hyundai's phone connectivity implementation isn't particularly fancy, either. The infotainment system connects to your typical Android-based phones and iPhones for hands-free use. Call clarity is fairly good, and the car connected to our phone every time we started it up.

We didn’t experience any issues with Hyundai’s Bluetooth implementation, though we do wish the company had expanded its phone connectivity features to include contact images and text messaging support.

  • shahrooz
    waiting for the Crysis guy
    Reply
  • Nintendo Maniac 64
    I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).

    Now THAT'S something Tom's should review. :P
    Reply
  • assasin32
    My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.

    And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.
    Reply
  • stellato12
    .....but can it play Crysis?
    Reply
  • cknobman
    Waiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.
    Reply
  • tuanies
    9537403 said:
    I thought at first the car in the thumbnail was a Tesla Model S... I mean, it IS essentially a computer (runs Linux on dual Tegra 3s and all).

    Now THAT'S something Tom's should review. :P

    We're trying to get one in for a week but considering how well they're selling it'll be a while.


    9537406 said:
    My stereo which is primitive by comparison has a far faster "boot up" time than any of these "infotainment" systems these cars have. It starts when I turn on the car there is mabey a 1sec delay and another 1sec if I decide to put in a cd as it has to start spinning it.

    And if you want the fancy features I still think an AUX connection from the stereo to the phone is the best bet. If its a smartphone you have the internet/mp3/pandora/gps and if you want an OBD2 scanner like Torque in case your car breaks down. And people usually upgrade these things once every few years and there will be no compatability issues using an AUX connection.

    They still have aux inputs. However, I have an article idea that'll appeal to smartphone users such as yourself - just waiting for the Windows Phone 8 launch to commence ;) I'm open to any ideas you want to see covered though.

    9537418 said:
    .....but can it play Crysis?

    No but if you want to port Angry Birds or Duke Nukem 3D to QNX and find a way to get them loaded onto the infotainment system, go for it :p

    9537421 said:
    Waiting for an STI version of the Subaru BRX or TRD version of the Scion FR-S. From most reviews I have read the Hyundai handles like a pig on the track and those Brembo brakes have issues after a few laps.

    You and i both. The Hyundai is a fun daily, but that extra weight doesn't help it around a track.

    Reply
  • What is this on Tom's again....?
    Reply
  • travish82
    348 horsepower and 295 foot-pounds of torque... WTF? I feel like I've been living under a rock. I guess this is what happens when you only buy used cars with cash. Suddenly Hyundias are freaking fast.
    Reply
  • xsamitt
    I come here for Commuters not cars.This site has really lost it.
    Reply
  • xsamitt
    Make that computers lol.
    Reply