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Asus Intros PB287Q True 4K/UHD Monitor

On Monday, Asus launched the PB287Q, a 28-inch display designed with prosumers and gamers in mind. The panel offers a 3840 x 2160 resolution at 60 Hz, and is available now in Taiwan, Asia Pacific, European and North American markets with a starting price of $799 USD.

According to the company, the new white light emitting diode (WLED) display packs a pixel density of 157 pixels per inch (PPI). Additional hardware features include 1.07 billion colors, a brightness of 330cd/m², a 100,000,000:1 Asus Smart Contrast Ratio (ASCR), and a 1ms gray-to-gray (GTG) fast response time.

"There is also Picture-in-Picture (PiP) and Picture-by-Picture (PbP) support, with users being able to switch between video sources easily. PiP mode lets users display content from a second input source in a window placed in one corner of the display, while PbP mode splits the screen down the middle," states the PR.

The new display includes the new SplendidPlus Video Intelligence Technology that optimizes videos and images by enhancing color brightness, contrast, and sharpness. Users can switch between different modes including Reading, Darkroom, Scenery, Standard, Theater, sRGB, Game, and Night View. Also included is the company's EyeCare Technology, which adopts Flicker-free technology and uses DC adjustment backlighting to reduce onscreen flicker.

This new display also packs the company's VividPixel technology that enhances image outlines and reduces noise bars. There's also the QuickFit Virtual Scale that allows users to preview actual-size photos and documents on screen prior to printing.

"The PB287Q features a slim, ergonomic design with a full range of swivel, tilt, pivot and height adjustments to provide the user with an ideal viewing position. The PB287Q is also VESA mount compatible for wall or stand mounting," states the PR.

The list of inputs and outputs include DisplayPort 1.2, one HDMI 1.4 port, one HDMI 1.4 port that supports MHL, 3.5 mm audio input and 3.5 mm audio output. The panel can pivot 90 degrees, tilt 20 degrees to -5 degrees, and swivel 60 degrees. The viewing angles are 170 degrees (H) / 160 degrees (V).

  • ragenalien
    Looks like the same panel used in the samsung U28D590D. 60hz TN with 8 bit color expanded to 10 with some kind of demon magic.
    Reply
  • icrf
    HDMI 1.4, not 2.0, so only 30 Hz there. The only way to get 60 Hz is over DisplayPort, and even then, only using MST, which isn't exactly ideal, as consistency can be finicky.

    I know, no video cards output HDMI 2.0, either, but something has to be first, right?
    Reply
  • firefoxx04
    Nxic reviewed this over a week ago at least. . . .
    Reply
  • firefoxx04
    Ncix reviewed this over a week ago at least. . . .
    Reply
  • knowom
    I wouldn't pay $400's for it let alone $800 marginally more resolution space than 2x1080p displays which can be had for $100's-$150 routinely now.

    It's real world value worth is more like $200-$300's if comparing objectively especially taken into account it's certainly cheaper to mass produce a fair amount of less of both glass and plastic involved.
    Reply
  • David Dewis
    13205198 said:
    I wouldn't pay $400's for it let alone $800 marginally more resolution space than 2x1080p displays which can be had for $100's-$150 routinely now.

    It's real world value worth is more like $200-$300's if comparing objectively especially taken into account it's certainly cheaper to mass produce a fair amount of less of both glass and plastic involved.

    I wouldn't say that 4x the resolution of 1080p is marginal. That is what it is. 3840 x 2160. My samsung u28d590d is due for delivery tomorrow and I intend to run it with my r9 290 which will be xfired withing the next month or two. It cost me £480, only slightly more than the cost of a decent 1440p monitor in the UK.
    Reply
  • blaint
    HDMI 1.4, not 2.0, so only 30 Hz there. The only way to get 60 Hz is over DisplayPort, and even then, only using MST, which isn't exactly ideal, as consistency can be finicky.

    I know, no video cards output HDMI 2.0, either, but something has to be first, right?

    Yeah, at this point I am starting to feel like video card companies are playing a game of chicken with the display manufacturers. I understand a fair amount of R&D and product design goes into each respective release, but let's face it, HDMI 2.0 wasn't just sprung on us a couple weeks ago. It's been in the works for quite a while now, and the consortium finalized it many months ago.

    To some excuse I will forgive the card companies, The length of time between their major chip refreshes is longer (relatively speaking), but even they only get a minor pass since the math on 4K bandwidth requirements didn't require the Rosetta Stone to interpret.

    It isn't exactly an industry secret that 1.4 does not have the bandwidth to support the specs they are touting (4K@60) so the fact that they to waltzed right passed 2.0 and settled is frankly baffling to me. It is utterly beside the point that there are no 2.0 video cards out yet. There WILL be soon enough, and when there finally are, THIS panel will not be on my list of candidates.

    Nice waste of resources, Asus.
    Reply
  • David Dewis
    13205693 said:
    HDMI 1.4, not 2.0, so only 30 Hz there. The only way to get 60 Hz is over DisplayPort, and even then, only using MST, which isn't exactly ideal, as consistency can be finicky.

    I know, no video cards output HDMI 2.0, either, but something has to be first, right?

    Yeah, at this point I am starting to feel like video card companies are playing a game of chicken with the display manufacturers. I understand a fair amount of R&D and product design goes into each respective release, but let's face it, HDMI 2.0 wasn't just sprung on us a couple weeks ago. It's been in the works for quite a while now, and the consortium finalized it many months ago.

    To some excuse I will forgive the card companies, The length of time between their major chip refreshes is longer (relatively speaking), but even they only get a minor pass since the math on 4K bandwidth requirements didn't require the Rosetta Stone to interpret.

    It isn't exactly an industry secret that 1.4 does not have the bandwidth to support the specs they are touting (4K@60) so the fact that they to waltzed right passed 2.0 and settled is frankly baffling to me. It is utterly beside the point that there are no 2.0 video cards out yet. There WILL be soon enough, and when there finally are, THIS panel will not be on my list of candidates.

    Nice waste of resources, Asus.

    I guess GPU manufactures are happy to rely on display port at this time instead of adding hdmi2.0. Most enthusiasts have a monitor that supports DP as will most 4k displays. Why add a new tech which could bump up price if it's not really required by the market just yet.
    Reply
  • CaMiX
    No Gsync?
    Reply
  • lancelot123
    I'm happy with the pixel density of my current monitor, 24" 1200p. This makes a 28" 4K too small in my opinion. I would love to see a cheap 48" 4K monitor.
    Reply