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Congressman Unveils Bill to Fight ISP Caps

If you thought that the debacle over ISP net caps was just starting to boil, then you'll be even more surprised to hear that the issue has now landed on the front doors of Congress.

New York Congressman Eric Massa (D-NY) promised that he would put forth a bill called the "Broadband Internet Fairness Act" that would "prevent job killing broadband internet downloading caps," said Massa.

Time Warner Cabe is at the forefront of this heated issue. Because of a roll-out in New York state, many customers in the area have already canceled their TWC accounts and moved onto other services. 

According to Massa:

"Time Warner has announced an ill-conceived plan to charge residential and business broadband fees based on the amount of data they download. They have yet to explain how increased internet usage increases their costs."

While Massa is all for business profits, he is against TWC and others like it, especially in areas where the ISP holds a monopoly position.

"Time Warner's decision has the potential to more than triple customers' current rates and I think most families will find this to be too taxing to afford. Time Warner believes they can do this in Rochester NY, Greensboro NC, Austin TX and San Antonio TX, and it's almost certainly just a matter of time before they attempt to overcharge all of their customers. And while I favor a business's right to maximize their profit potential, I believe safeguards must be put in place when a business has a monopoly on a specific region," said Massa.

TWC, AT&T and Comcast and other ISPs are the target of the new bill.

Massa's page on the issue stats:

"In addition to this excessive and disproportionate charge, as internet usage increases by an average of 50% per year, companies setting caps sets a horrible, long-term, precedent. At a time when Americans need to utilize all available assets to improve the economy, limiting internet usage, which this plan would do, handicaps our ability to compete on the global stage. Furthermore, it will have significant stifling effects on start ups and small businesses."

  • akhodjaev
    Exactly!
    Take the licence from TWC. we do not need stupid ideas which will drag US backwards.
    SOmeone throw shoe size 10 to TWC CEO, please. or hack their system and let their system fried
    Reply
  • chaosgs
    Finally a big guy standing up for the little guys.
    Reply
  • anders009
    It's nice to see that there is someone on the hill with some common sense and/or listening to the people they are supposed to represent.
    Reply
  • anders009
    It's nice to see that there is some common sense still on the Hill and that they are actually listening to the folks that put them there to represent them.
    Reply
  • descendency
    Go get them! Beat down the monopolies that control our crap internet. When someone gets serious about it, maybe we can finally get some good internet.
    Reply
  • MotorMouth
    I'm all for something to be done BY US THE CONSUMER. TWC has a right to charge whatever they want. And we have the right not to buy what they sale! The government needs to stop this crap. I don't like what they're doing but we have the finale say so. Don't buy it!!!
    Reply
  • magnus962
    That didn't take long! I guess sometimes the people do have a voice?
    Reply
  • jsloan
    ChaosGSFinally a big guy standing up for the little guys.
    or maybe he's just faking it to offset the fact that he's taking huge amount of money from the companies he's now looking to regulate...
    Reply
  • hellwig
    "Time Warner has announced an ill-conceived plan to charge residential and business broadband fees based on the amount of data they download. They have yet to explain how increased internet usage increases their costs."

    Even better, I want a cable company to explain to me how reducing the total amount of data downloaded in a month helps the problem of not having enough bandwidth at any given moment. Even if everyone had a 5GB cap, if they all chose to download at the same time, it wouldn't solve anything, there would still be bottle necks. Its not total usage over time, its total usage at any given moment.

    Reply
  • AdamB5000
    My only fear is that this could end up being one step toward our government mandating what companies can and cannot do with the internet. We always talk about NOT regulating the internet, and I wonder if a bill passing that tells an ISP what they can and cannot do will lead to larger issues.

    My point is that caps suck balls. There's no two ways about it. I just wonder if it's a government issue. One way for TWC to get rid of the cap idea is for users to switch providers. That'll make more noise than anything.

    I don't know. Just thinking out loud. I'd just hate to see a bill two years from now regulating something with the net now that the door might be open to federal regulations. The last thing we need is the FCC wondering if they can get their hands on the internet.

    But yeah, caps suck. I'm just nervous.
    Reply