Apple Tablet Aiming to "Redefine Print"

We know quite a bit about Apple's tablet – that is, quite a bit seeing as how the company hasn't even said they're going to release one. We know how much it's going to cost (between $800 and $1,000) and we know when it's going to hit the market (very early 2010, possibly February but with shipments arriving at Apple in December '09). We also know who's providing the displays (Wintek), and we know who's got the contract for batteries (apparently DynaPack is supplying 300,000 long lasting battery packs a month for the device). Add to that a processor from Apple's own P.A. Semi and HSPDA and you get a pretty rounded out picture of what Apple is going to come up with.

However, what we don't know, is who Apple is going to target with the device. Is it really going to be one giant iPod Touch or is it going to be more of a netbook? Then again, could it be Apple's answer to the Kindle? Well, if this week's rumors are to be believed then Apple's tablet is going to redefine print.

According to Gizmodo's Brian Lam, Apple is currently in talks with several media companies rooted in print. According to Lam, these negotiations revolve around, "content for a 'new device.' And they're not just going for e-books and mags. They're aiming to redefine print."

Giz goes on to cite sources from the New York Times who say the company is in talks with Apple, and says the company is also talking to McGraw Hill and Oberlin Press who are working with Apple to move textbooks to iTunes.

Sounds a lot like the Kindle DX to us, what with newspapers and textbook publishers jumping on board. Check out the full story here.

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  • hellwig
    @njkid: you lack vision. This is apple here. They could slap their logo on a brick, charge $500, and sell millions to idiots who buy anything labeled as Apple, regardless of what it does or how well it does it. Then they find out the brick's battery can't be replaced, and complain on the forums. Apple deletes the forum entries with the complaints, and the people who complained forget there was ever a problem, and line up to buy to new iBrick 2.0, which is the same as the first iBrick, but only costs $400 this time.
    15
  • Anonymous
    at that price point and for its rumored purpose i foresee extremely limited adoption.
    14
  • Other Comments
  • Anonymous
    at that price point and for its rumored purpose i foresee extremely limited adoption.
    14
  • hellwig
    @njkid: you lack vision. This is apple here. They could slap their logo on a brick, charge $500, and sell millions to idiots who buy anything labeled as Apple, regardless of what it does or how well it does it. Then they find out the brick's battery can't be replaced, and complain on the forums. Apple deletes the forum entries with the complaints, and the people who complained forget there was ever a problem, and line up to buy to new iBrick 2.0, which is the same as the first iBrick, but only costs $400 this time.
    15
  • Anonymous
    hellwig@njkid: you lack vision. This is apple here. They could slap their logo on a brick, charge $500, and sell millions to idiots who buy anything labeled as Apple, regardless of what it does or how well it does it. Then they find out the brick's battery can't be replaced, and complain on the forums. Apple deletes the forum entries with the complaints, and the people who complained forget there was ever a problem, and line up to buy to new iBrick 2.0, which is the same as the first iBrick, but only costs $400 this time.


    i understand where you are coming from but my comment was meant for limited adoption with people with a brain and not by mindless drones.
    7