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Toshiba Ships Thin 256GB Blade X-Gale SSDs

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 19 comments

Toshiba's new modules are for manufacturers only, however they should allow for thinner notebooks and tablets with bigger storage capacities.

Sunday Toshiba revealed that its new Blade X-gale ultra-thin series of SSD modules is available for manufacturers, offering maximum sequential read speeds of 220 MB/s and maximum sequential write speeds of 180 MB/s. The company said that the modules are ideal for mobile devices like tablets, laptops, netbooks and more. They were also previously revealed to be used by Apple in the new MacBook Air.

"Delivering a product that enables superior user experience in a smaller footprint is the ultimate goal," noted Scott Nelson, vice president, Memory Business Unit, Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. "The density of MLC NAND enables the creation of smaller form factor high density storage solutions, and Toshiba, as the technology leader for NAND storage solutions, will continue to innovate in this space."

According to the company, the Blade X-gale line will come in three capacities: 64 GB, 128 GB, and 256 GB. The first two capacities will have a thickness of only 2.2-mm, 42-percent thinner than the typical mSATA SSD. Toshiba added that its base design technology minimizes board warpage during thinning, allowing for 256 GB capacity by mounting on both sides. The 256 GB module measures slightly bigger than the other two at 3.7-mm.

There's speculation that manufacturers will use Toshiba's new SSDs to create MacBook Air clones running Microsoft's Windows platform. As seen in a recent MacBook Air teardown, the SSD was a major part of the computer's super-slim profile. Consumers will likely see thinner notebooks next year while tablet storage capacities climb into the 256 GB realm.

Toshiba said that it also offers designers a choice of mSATA and Half-Slim SSD modules in capacities up to 128 GB.

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Top Comments
  • 19 Hide
    aznguy0028 , November 8, 2010 10:19 PM
    kscr7thats small

    That's what she... nevermind.
Other Comments
  • 7 Hide
    nforce4max , November 8, 2010 9:49 PM
    Took long enough and its a real shame that it is not in the normal retail market. >.>
  • 6 Hide
    Randomacts , November 8, 2010 9:50 PM
    If they can make it cheap enough that places don't charge an arm and a leg for it in laptops I'm all for it.
  • Display all 19 comments.
  • 6 Hide
    kscr7 , November 8, 2010 10:01 PM
    thats small
  • 0 Hide
    Darkerson , November 8, 2010 10:16 PM
    Nifty. Hopefully it will become more mainstream as time moves on.
  • 19 Hide
    aznguy0028 , November 8, 2010 10:19 PM
    kscr7thats small

    That's what she... nevermind.
  • 1 Hide
    Nesto1000 , November 8, 2010 11:48 PM
    I wonder why Toshiba didn't implement them in their line of laptops?
  • 1 Hide
    iam2thecrowe , November 8, 2010 11:50 PM
    good idea, hard drives you can slot in like ram. Would be useful to make a 3.5" or 5 1/4"drive bay for desktops that allows these to be slotted in.
  • 2 Hide
    User69 , November 9, 2010 3:09 AM
    Quote:
    There's speculation that manufacturers will use Toshiba's new SSDs to create MacBook Air clones running Microsoft's Windows platform.


    Gotta love the bias!
  • 2 Hide
    gramps , November 9, 2010 3:36 AM
    Looks just like a couple of sticks of RAM (I suppose they're not really that much different).

    Might need a few SSD slots on my next motherboard...
  • -5 Hide
    v100 , November 9, 2010 3:53 AM
    this is the thing that kills Air's battery by 33%!!?
  • 0 Hide
    formin , November 9, 2010 4:09 AM
    SSD are going to start looking more and more like traditional RAM chips
    Once they start using a wider bus the pins will be on the long side
    and the data rates of future SSDs will prob cause ram to disappear
  • 0 Hide
    dEAne , November 9, 2010 5:58 AM
    SSD is now getting bigger now a days - the capacity not the size.
  • 0 Hide
    nick8191 , November 9, 2010 6:13 AM
    I don't think we will be seeing too much of this next year - at least not in these higher storage ranges. The price of SSD isn't going down fast enough that I could imagine people flocking to buy laptops containing this technology (not to mention that most people don't know the difference between a SSD and a STD). From my experience, most people looking for smaller and slimmer laptops are also looking not to spend too much cash. It's a shame though, I have been using solid state drives in my PC's for a while now and the performance increase + noise reduction is simply amazing! I wish that this would become a mainstream solution sooner, but manufacturers are going to need to do better on pricing (whether or not that is possible at this time is a different story).
  • 0 Hide
    Gin Fushicho , November 9, 2010 6:39 AM
    Jeez, looks like sticks of RAM. I can see a lot of customers confused. "This is REALLLLLLLY expensive RAM, it must be good RAM."

    "Why won't it fit in thee slot?!"
  • 0 Hide
    requiemsallure , November 9, 2010 1:29 PM
    Gin FushichoJeez, looks like sticks of RAM. I can see a lot of customers confused. "This is REALLLLLLLY expensive RAM, it must be good RAM.""Why won't it fit in thee slot?!"



    comparing it to ram its probably really cheap in comparison $/Gb
  • 0 Hide
    andrewfy , November 9, 2010 2:34 PM
    There's an analysis over at the daily circuit that puts it in the perspective of Gigabytes per gram, comparing it to the 3.5" 3TB Western Digital as well as the 2.5" 640GB Seagate Momentus with surprising results.
  • 0 Hide
    NightLight , November 9, 2010 2:58 PM
    we are just a few steps away from having datarods :p 
  • 0 Hide
    andrewfy , November 9, 2010 3:02 PM
    forminSSD are going to start looking more and more like traditional RAM chipsOnce they start using a wider bus the pins will be on the long sideand the data rates of future SSDs will prob cause ram to disappear


    Actually there's a good analysis over at the daily circuit from a couple days ago that compares DRAM to SSD that explains why this will probably never happen -
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , November 10, 2010 7:26 AM
    Ah, so these are the ones in the Macbook Air. Hopefully someone makes a retail eSATA flash drive out of those!