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Dell's Latitude On Flash Boots Laptop in Seconds

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 7 comments

Dell's new instant-on offering uses the laptop's x86 processor rather than depend on an ARM-based version.

Dell said yesterday that it is offering a memory module that can boot up a computer--or rather, a laptop in this case--in mere seconds. Called Latitude ON | FLASH, the quick-boot system is an additional option to the current quick-boot system that uses an ARM processor. But as it stands now, the new quick-boot module is only offered as an option for Dell's Latitude E4200, E4300, and Z laptops.

PC World reports that the module uses the laptop's x86 processor rather than a separate ARM chip, and snaps into an internal mini-card slot. The drawback to this option is that it uses more power than the ARM-based version, making battery life less than stellar compared to the present option. However, the quick-boot memory module is supposedly a considerably cheaper alternative.

Dell's Lionel Menchaca added in this blog that Latitude ON | FLASH delivers a broad level of functionality at a significantly lower price point than the original Latitude On OMAP-based offering. "But with a new Gen 2 interface and the addition of Skype, support for Flash and full web browsing functionality, thin client capabilities, and other types of  media, Latitude ON | FLASH seems like it might be a good compromise for business users who still want instant on access to a lot of the productivity tools they use everyday without having to boot into the operating system," Menchaca said.

The benefit of a quick-boot option is that end-users can access applications and the Internet in just a few seconds after booting the machine. The first instant-on capability came with the Latitude Z laptop, using a Texas Instrument OMAP chip based on an ARM design that supports an instant-on environment.

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  • 2 Hide
    wildwell , December 18, 2009 11:13 PM
    How big a difference in battery life are we talking about here?
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , December 19, 2009 6:25 AM
    Instant boot? Boot the full OS once, put the computer to sleep. Waking it up is my instant boot :-)
  • 0 Hide
    HansVonOhain , December 19, 2009 4:34 PM
    If this is instant boot, I am hoping it is not like Asus' ExpressGate. I am also hoping that this will not a be a limited OS for that fast boot. Also as others have mentioned, how much of a battery difference there is.
  • 3 Hide
    apache_lives , December 19, 2009 11:57 PM
    askmeInstant boot? Boot the full OS once, put the computer to sleep. Waking it up is my instant boot :-)


    S3 chews a bit of power still (to ram, chipset etc to hold the contents of the ram), this sounds like a zero power off state that starts up just as quick...
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , December 20, 2009 8:57 PM
    Its probably another lame Linux OS that has very limited use. I have a Lenovo S10e with a similar useless product. I ended up uninstalling it because it would actually cause Windows to boot slower because it wants to boot first. I just don't see the point?
  • 1 Hide
    littlec , December 20, 2009 11:38 PM
    Yeah my Asus G50VT came with a similar OS called "Express Gate" it's pretty lame but if you're in a jam and just need to get on the web to read something or use IM/Skype it's pretty fast.
  • 0 Hide
    zak_mckraken , December 21, 2009 2:01 PM
    My Win7 desktop also boots in seconds. 45 seconds to be more precise.