Google Tells Feds to Obtain a Warrant to Access Gmail

Search engine giant Google has told U.S. government agencies to obtain a warrant should they wish to access Gmail user accounts.

American government agencies, which consists of federal, state and local authorities, made over 8,400 requests for nearly 15,000 accounts from July through to December 2012. 88 percent of those queries saw Google complying with a certain amount of the requests.

Google added that 22 percent of the aforementioned requests were made under search warrants delivered through the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA).

"In order to compel us to produce content in Gmail we require an ECPA search warrant," said Google spokesperson Chris Gaither. "If they come for registration information, that's one thing, but if they ask for content of e-mail, that's another thing."

During the December of 2012, the U.S. government approved a bill that sees law enforcement not being able to search through email, private Facebook messages and other electronic forms of communication without a warrant.

 

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18 comments
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  • meluvcookies
    How was this already not a legal requirement for law enforcement agencies?

    Good for Google
    26
  • Daedalus12
    Hard to believe they were trying to get this information without a warrant. Way to hold your ground Google!
    24
  • Skippy27
    All the government agencies should ALWAYS be required to get a warrant for any information or any US person for any reason.

    There is absolutely no reason they can't take the time to show a judge reasonable cause to justify it. Even in cases of emergency that time is of the essence, they are able to get a judge to review and sign off on a warrant quite quickly. Even when it involves classified or sensitive information there are judges available for this exact thing. The procedure of getting the information and then a warrant is ridiculous and a flat out violation of the rights of the people of the US regardless of any law they attempt to create skirting the issue.
    16
  • Other Comments
  • meluvcookies
    How was this already not a legal requirement for law enforcement agencies?

    Good for Google
    26
  • Daedalus12
    Hard to believe they were trying to get this information without a warrant. Way to hold your ground Google!
    24
  • kingnoobe
    Google maybe a little corrupt, but this is why I still welcome our new overlords.
    13