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Diskeeper Can Help Prevent HDD Fragmentation

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 22 comments

The Diskeeper Corporation claims that its technology can prevent HDD fragmentation.

There's nothing more hateful than a hard drive that's so fragmented, ants could build a new mound before a single file can be accessed. It would be nice if it were possible to find a way to prevent fragmentation before it even begins to fester. Unfortunately, disk fragmentation has become another tolerated aspect of life like changing a flat tire or picking up after a toddler on a toy rampage.

But maybe that's about to change. The Diskeeper Corporation claims that its latest Diskeeper 2010 products can prevent cluttered drives using its proprietary IntelliWrite fragmentation prevention technology. To prove its case, the company released a white paper document explaining the technology (pdf), and how it invokes faster write speeds while preventing the annoying clutter.

According to the company, IntelliWrite is an advanced file system driver that leverages and improves upon modern Windows’ file system “Best Fit” file write design in order to write a file in a non-fragmented state. Diskeeper also said that, in addition to fragmentation prevention and better write performance, IntelliWrite provides an "energy friendly approach" and better compatibility to other storage management solutions.

Additionally, Diskeeper's white paper provides a number of benchmarks showing how the technology improves drive performance, using a variety of common business applications and use cases. Currently the Diskeeper 2010 software utilizing IntelliWrite comes in five flavors: Professional, Pro Premier, Server, Enterprise Server, and Administrator.

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  • 10 Hide
    connacht , December 11, 2009 2:32 AM
    It's called setting your paging file to 4092MB Max, and 4092MB Min. Biggest culprits of fragmentation: Windows managed paging file, second to that is setting the minimum/initial size way lower then it should be. On a desktop PC, and even more-so on a server, you will "magiclly" find that you won't get above 5% fragmentation ever again. Yes it works on any/all RAID setups, external drives, no matter the size.
Other Comments
  • -3 Hide
    Ciuy , December 11, 2009 12:41 AM
    LoL ...
  • -3 Hide
    micky_lund , December 11, 2009 1:15 AM
    no
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , December 11, 2009 1:28 AM
    Disktrix Ultimate defrag does it all for me!
    It can keep my folders together (as opposed to keeping files together), I can focus windows, swap file, and program files on the outer ring of the disk (for faster access).
    I can also defrag folders with large data and backups (.iso, .rar, .mov, .divx, .avi, .mkv, .ogv, .zip, .7z, hybernation file, ...) to the inner ring which has slower data transfer (fast access of these files is seldom necessary)..

    There's really nothing I can't do with that software. And after a thorough defrag of 20 hours, my system will run like new for the first 6 months!
  • 0 Hide
    metalfellow , December 11, 2009 1:29 AM
    Hopefully M$ uses this or something similar (assuming it works well) in Win8 natively.
  • 5 Hide
    matchboxmatt , December 11, 2009 1:38 AM
    Am I the only one who finds the "M$" acronym incredibly obnoxious?
  • 10 Hide
    connacht , December 11, 2009 2:32 AM
    It's called setting your paging file to 4092MB Max, and 4092MB Min. Biggest culprits of fragmentation: Windows managed paging file, second to that is setting the minimum/initial size way lower then it should be. On a desktop PC, and even more-so on a server, you will "magiclly" find that you won't get above 5% fragmentation ever again. Yes it works on any/all RAID setups, external drives, no matter the size.
  • -7 Hide
    dmuir , December 11, 2009 5:13 AM
    Yay, Windows users may finally get to enjoy what everyone else has had for ages...
  • 1 Hide
    ravewulf , December 11, 2009 11:23 AM
    I'll believe it when I see it. Especially after years of use and in conditions where the disk is nearly full.
  • 2 Hide
    ravewulf , December 11, 2009 11:24 AM
    matchboxmattAm I the only one who finds the "M$" acronym incredibly obnoxious?

    No, you're not alone. It's really annoying
  • 1 Hide
    TunaSoda , December 11, 2009 11:57 AM
    As long as it can achieve this without needing to be resident... ;) 
  • 0 Hide
    mitch074 , December 11, 2009 11:57 AM
    Data fragmentation... Ah yes, as caused by Microsoft's lousy block allocator! I wonder when will MS finally correct it. I mean, I've been using NTFS-3G (on Linux) on NTFS volumes that can get rather full, and I've done a test:

    On a 70% full volume, with files of various sizes that see some churn from both OSes, copying a 650 Mb ISO file (a Linux distro) from Linux with NTFS-3G yielded 30 fragments.

    Deleting that file and copying the very same file to the very same volume under Vista (SP1) yielded 1314 fragments. And since I performed that test, NTFS-3G has improved its block allocator for disk full cases...

    I thought Microsoft had created NTFS. How comes an open source project can write a better driver for it?
  • 0 Hide
    g00ey , December 11, 2009 12:13 PM
    matchboxmattAm I the only one who finds the "M$" acronym incredibly obnoxious?


    Am I the only one who finds the company behind it incredibly obnoxious?
  • 0 Hide
    Hiniberus , December 11, 2009 12:27 PM
    Nope
  • 1 Hide
    icepick314 , December 11, 2009 1:05 PM
    this is unnecessary when SSD comes to mainstream....
  • 0 Hide
    jerther , December 11, 2009 1:23 PM
    True fragmentation was back in win98 days where heavy fragmentation, if not taken care of, could lock/crash up your system HAHA! uhm... now I laugh but back then I cried. Oh so many tears...

    But Ive always thought fragmentation was a win98 and xp thing. I've ran auslogics defrag on many vista machines and fragmentation was always nearly non existant... Anyways, I think we may all agree that progress is on the way :) 
  • 0 Hide
    ssalim , December 11, 2009 2:41 PM
    icepick314this is unnecessary when SSD comes to mainstream....


    True in... 10 years?
  • 0 Hide
    brett1042002 , December 11, 2009 5:21 PM
    CiuyLoL ...

    micky_lundno



    ^ this
  • 0 Hide
    that_aznpride101 , December 11, 2009 5:34 PM
    ProDigit80Disktrix Ultimate defrag does it all for me!It can keep my folders together (as opposed to keeping files together), I can focus windows, swap file, and program files on the outer ring of the disk (for faster access).I can also defrag folders with large data and backups (.iso, .rar, .mov, .divx, .avi, .mkv, .ogv, .zip, .7z, hybernation file, ...) to the inner ring which has slower data transfer (fast access of these files is seldom necessary)..There's really nothing I can't do with that software. And after a thorough defrag of 20 hours, my system will run like new for the first 6 months!


    Mark down this guy's post, it's obviously spam.
  • 0 Hide
    dark_lord69 , December 11, 2009 5:39 PM
    ssalimTrue in... 10 years?

    No, I think they will be cheap enough by next year that I might buy one... If only I could find a good one with an IDE connection for my old laptop and not one with the Jmicron issue.
  • 0 Hide
    kittle , December 11, 2009 5:43 PM
    Yes it does defrag your drive.
    But at what cost? It runs in the background consuming resources. There is NO option to completely defrag your drive while you wait like the windoze version will at least try to do. Instead you have to wait... and wait.. and wait.. and wonder wtf it is really doing in the background while your HD is chattering away.
    Add to that, the software is expensive for anyone with multiple PCs (as most TH readers have).

    If there was a shareware/freeware version I might be interested, but I tried their 45 day trial version and was not impressed
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