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UK Police Adopt New System to Extract Data from Phones

By - Source: PRWeb | B 21 comments
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Police in London have adopted a new system that will allow them to quickly extract data from suspects' phones.

The Metropolitan Police in the United Kingdom has started the roll out of a new system that's capable of extracting data from mobile phones extremely quickly. The technology comes from Radio Tactics and is called ACESO. The data extraction solution will be used across 16 boroughs in the capital. ACESO allows police to quickly extra data from the mobile phones (even SIM locked phones) of suspects while they're in custody.

The Metropolitan Police will be using the ACESO Kiosk, which is a touchscreen desktop set-up.  Deputy Assistant Commission of the Metropolitan Police Service, Stephen Kavanagh, explained that it will be used when a suspect is arrested and found with a phone that police suspect may have been used in crime. Kavanagh said traditional methods of data extraction involve sending the phone to the lab for analysis while the new system will give officers immediate access to the phone's data while the suspect is still in custody.

"Mobile phones and other devices are increasingly being used in all levels of criminal activity," Stephen Kavanagh, Deputy Assistant Commission of the Metropolitan Police Service," said in a statement. "Our ability to act on forensically-sound, time-critical information, from SMS to images contained on a device quickly gives us an advantage in combating crime, notably in terms of identifying people of interest quickly and progressing cases more efficiently," he later added.

As many as 300 Met personnel will be trained on the system.

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  • 21 Hide
    frombehind , May 19, 2012 1:14 PM
    I guess warrent-less wiretaps are not enough.... funny thing is even though the police "are now enabled" with technology to catch criminals better, I dont feel any safer.
  • 20 Hide
    michalmierzwa , May 19, 2012 1:48 PM
    Yeah, and the next thing on the market will be wireless HDD screening and data mining of suspected crakers or hackers with drive-by technology working with Google cars. LOL

    I don't feel safer either.
  • 20 Hide
    freggo , May 19, 2012 1:51 PM
    How long until this technology find it's way to the hacking community or to criminals (if there is a difference) ?
Other Comments
  • 21 Hide
    frombehind , May 19, 2012 1:14 PM
    I guess warrent-less wiretaps are not enough.... funny thing is even though the police "are now enabled" with technology to catch criminals better, I dont feel any safer.
  • 20 Hide
    michalmierzwa , May 19, 2012 1:48 PM
    Yeah, and the next thing on the market will be wireless HDD screening and data mining of suspected crakers or hackers with drive-by technology working with Google cars. LOL

    I don't feel safer either.
  • 20 Hide
    freggo , May 19, 2012 1:51 PM
    How long until this technology find it's way to the hacking community or to criminals (if there is a difference) ?
  • 9 Hide
    razor512 , May 19, 2012 2:47 PM
    Simple solution, take the phone apart, then cut some traces for 2 power connectors and 2 data connectors, then taking some thin wire, swap them, then do the same for your charge/sync cable.

    then if someone decided to copy your personal info, they will get pretty sparks from the phone instead

    modern smartphones often skimp on diodes and other protection circuits in order to reduce the cost and size of the unit, this makes it easier to fry them if power goes in the wrong areas (the only areas with any real protection, are the charging circuits, but send power into one of the data pins and you will quickly begin to fry things in the phone (just fine ones with the least protected paths to any of the memory chips for faster results)
  • 1 Hide
    frombehind , May 19, 2012 2:49 PM
    It is also interesting that this "technology" comes after courts declared that it is unconstitutional to force a person to "unlock" locked parts of their phone so they can searched for criminal activity - 5th amendment.
  • 6 Hide
    killerclick , May 19, 2012 3:00 PM
    Use deniable encryption.
  • 10 Hide
    razor512 , May 19, 2012 3:05 PM
    Quote:
    It is also interesting that this "technology" comes after courts declared that it is unconstitutional to force a person to "unlock" locked parts of their phone so they can searched for criminal activity - 5th amendment.


    The UK is a little different, they often pioneer the tyranny a few years before it makes it's way to the US, (most of the freedoms lost in the past 30 years, were lost in the UK first, then made their way to the US 3-6 years later)
  • 2 Hide
    lahawzel , May 19, 2012 3:13 PM
    One wonders if said system leaves the phone intact.

    It'd be extremely embarassing if nothing incriminating was found and the suspect is acquitted, sans one smartphone from his pockets.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , May 19, 2012 5:56 PM
    Device encryption is available for proper smartphones.
  • 6 Hide
    willard , May 19, 2012 6:29 PM
    Moral of the story: Encrypt your phone so people need a supercomputer to access its contents. It's not hard.
  • 4 Hide
    memadmax , May 19, 2012 6:40 PM
    Glad I don't live in the UK... you guys are crazy....
  • 8 Hide
    willard , May 19, 2012 6:52 PM
    frombehindIt is also interesting that this "technology" comes after courts declared that it is unconstitutional to force a person to "unlock" locked parts of their phone so they can searched for criminal activity - 5th amendment.

    You do realize that the US constitution does not apply to countries that are not the US, right?
  • 3 Hide
    Plasmid , May 19, 2012 6:54 PM
    Oh noes they are going to find my donkey porn on my cell phone. lulz
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , May 19, 2012 9:11 PM
    Lets say i enabled the 10 incoorect trys and my phone auto deletes would that prevent this? Or is it not a brute force attack?
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , May 20, 2012 2:16 AM
    Welcome to our future. The Gov. is making sure that going forward into the information age we do not have any "rights" whatsoever. They implement them from the start so that idocratic people can't point to constitution or any other source (every country has some sort of it) and say it’s their right therefor it is not, right? Because every politician of today knows that our generation is to lazy and unwilling to fight for what they believe should be their right so they only live of the rights left over by generations who were willing to fight for them. No offence people but why do I read people respond with "this is unconstitutional" and then hear a response along the line of "that is not in constituting" or "that’s not America so you constitution doesn’t apply". PEOPLE...who gives the F*** if it is in constitution or if UK has one? What you should be asking is: do we AS PEOPLE control the Gov. or does Gov. control us?

    Who cares if it’s not in constitution or if there is a Constitution to begin with? IF we as people tell our Gov. we don’t want something then they HAVE TO listen to us since they are elected to do as we tell them, no more no less. But that is only if those demands fare followed by "OR ELSE" and we are ready to see it through.

    How come so many let them self being controlled by so few. Why do you think our founding fathers said that if people want to change the constitution at any point they should be able to do so and they have the right to do so? Because who would be able to stop us from doing it anyway? Few ass politicians? WE ARE in control it’s just that they keep most of us in delusion that we have none. So next time someone says it’s not in the constitution or they don’t have one then tell them: SO WHAT!? Since when does WRONG become RIGHT because its not written on a paper or someone 200 years ago didn’t die for it? That’s why this tyranny will continue till they have (thx to technology) the total control over our opinions on everything and we actually are incapable to have independent opinion and the will to fight for what WE think is right.

    I have predicted this and 1000 things 20 years ago....I realize how right I was 12 years ago but i would have never thought we would go down w/o a fight. Average person of today will is using his/her RIGHTS as commodity bargaining tool for convenience. I wonder what will happen ones they have run out of rights with which to trade. And while this is sad it is not as sad as how many people will down-rate this comment. I remember how we asked our teacher back in the day as to how it was possible for so many people of one of the most civilized country of that time period to fallow Hitler and only so few seemed to realize and have the guts to resist....well I’m scared that I will get to answer my own question sometime in the future...jet I believe in American spirit, or maybe I too have become delusional. I hope so since the price of me being right would be too great to just being able to say: I told you so.
  • 1 Hide
    Benihana , May 20, 2012 8:48 AM
    http://www.radio-tactics.com/products/technology/aceso-kiosk-camera#info

    There is is fellas, in all it's glory. God save the Queen of idiots!
  • -1 Hide
    eddieroolz , May 20, 2012 4:07 PM
    I guess more reasons to own a BlackBerry now? hahaha
  • 3 Hide
    Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer , May 20, 2012 5:26 PM
    I don't live in the UK, and I don't think there's anything TOO compromising on my phone, but I sure did just go see what Blackberry models my carrier has... :-\ It's the principle of the thing, d@mm!t!
  • 2 Hide
    ik242 , May 21, 2012 2:26 AM
    razor512Simple solution, take the phone apart, then cut some traces for 2 power connectors and 2 data connectors, then taking some thin wire, swap them, then do the same for your charge/sync cable...


    i did this and it was not trivial to say the least. it is simple idea but execution is complicated by small scale of components and PCB traces. this requires skill and tools that are not in everyone's toolbox.
  • 1 Hide
    alyoshka , May 21, 2012 7:13 AM
    This stuff has been happening in the open market from way back when I used the 8210 and even before. We have contact pads for nearly all makes of phones, why did they think of it now??? Ah... criminals are now using Satphones.... ok. That makes sense..... so basically this stuff is to make the average citizen a little more scared than he already is, next time he ought to be sure not to have pics of his family in the phone or could have really bad charges bought up against him.
    This has got to be the height of craziness.
    If we don't want you to lay hands on our phones there ain't diddle shit you can do about it without a warrant, you touch my phone and it's invasion of privacy.
    Get data out of it "illegally" is data theft......
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