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Pocket Desktop Protects Your Files, Privacy When Using PCs

By - Source: Pocket Desktop | B 20 comments

It's a customized Linux OS on a bootable drive so that you can surf the internet without leaving a trace on the host PC.

Pocket Desktop launched on Friday its flagship product which allows users to surf the Internet and manage files on anyone's desktop or laptop without compromising the privacy and security of both the user and the host PC. Called Pocket Desktop, it's a USB drive with a bootable Linux-based OS that combines web privacy, file security, virus protection, file backup and file recovery all on one pocket-sized device.

“As technologies became smaller in size, we set out to create an all-in-one solution to enable people to load not just their individual files onto a drive, but their entire computer, complete with the most sophisticated privacy, security, protection and recovery software available," said David Hayek, technology officer for Pocket Desktop. "The second task was to offer this all-in-one solution for the same price as an old-fashioned storage drive."

According to the company, the user simply plugs the device into any computer's USB port and restarts the machine. If the PC is configured to use a USB stick as a bootable option, it will load up the built-in Linux-based Pocket Desktop OS. There users have access to more than 40 popular pre-installed apps like Skype, Open Office and Firefox.

"From this point, the user can perform any routine function on their computer – from word processing to web surfing, chat and more – all with complete privacy, security and back-up ability," the company said on Friday. "The Pocket Desktop is platform-agnostic and works with both Apple and Windows machines."

The tech specs reveal that the USB drive uses 256-bit encryption to protect all files that are created and saved on the device. The core of the Linux-based Pocket Desktop OS is supposedly read-only, preventing viruses and malware from loading. However the device comes with an anti-virus solution pre-installed so that the user can scan and clean the host computer.

Pocket Desktop said on Friday that external files can be backed up to the device as well, and an additional file recovery app can repair and retrieve corrupt files from any computer. Everything that resides on the USB-based pocket PC and cannot be accessed unless the host PC is rebooted into the Pocket Desktop OS.

Pricing for Pocket Desktop is $19.95 for the 4 GB version, $39.95 for the 8 GB model, and $59.99 for the 16 GB model. For more information, check out what Pocket Desktop has to offer here. Now the question is this: will anyone actually let you reboot their desktop or laptop to use this PC-in-a-pocket?

 

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Top Comments
  • 13 Hide
    el33t , December 9, 2012 9:24 PM
    What? Isn't bootable linux USBs capable of all those features mentioned something old? Why is this news?
  • 10 Hide
    shoelessinsight , December 9, 2012 9:41 PM
    el33tWhat? Isn't bootable linux USBs capable of all those features mentioned something old? Why is this news?

    It doesn't sound like they're doing anything that hasn't been doable for the last decade. But for anyone that's not tech savvy enough to set up their own bootable Linux USB drive, there's value in the service of having someone else set it up. So I guess this is new in the sense that a company is now selling that service.
Other Comments
  • 0 Hide
    sykozis , December 9, 2012 9:18 PM
    I'd be willing to try it, if I could order from a trusted vendor as opposed to a website I've never seen or heard of before.
  • 2 Hide
    weierstrass , December 9, 2012 9:21 PM
    Either this, or you use your smart phone.
  • 13 Hide
    el33t , December 9, 2012 9:24 PM
    What? Isn't bootable linux USBs capable of all those features mentioned something old? Why is this news?
  • 7 Hide
    weierstrass , December 9, 2012 9:24 PM
    Installing Linux on an USB stick is also pretty easy and will cost you only 10$ for a 16GB one.
  • 10 Hide
    shoelessinsight , December 9, 2012 9:41 PM
    el33tWhat? Isn't bootable linux USBs capable of all those features mentioned something old? Why is this news?

    It doesn't sound like they're doing anything that hasn't been doable for the last decade. But for anyone that's not tech savvy enough to set up their own bootable Linux USB drive, there's value in the service of having someone else set it up. So I guess this is new in the sense that a company is now selling that service.
  • 2 Hide
    turbotong , December 9, 2012 10:14 PM
    Wait... if the USB is read-only, then why are the different sizes necessary?
  • -2 Hide
    kcorp2003 , December 9, 2012 10:25 PM
    This is just too funny to read.
  • 0 Hide
    jhansonxi , December 9, 2012 10:30 PM
    turbotongWait... if the USB is read-only, then why are the different sizes necessary?

    Probably using U3 or similar: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U3
  • 3 Hide
    mman74 , December 9, 2012 10:57 PM
    You can start a business doing this kind of shit? Wow I am going to sell air in a bottle. True you can get your own air readily available anywhere, but I am going to market my air as being more secure, private and free from viruses.
  • 0 Hide
    stickmansam , December 9, 2012 11:09 PM
    Hmm I wonder if any private info can be grabbed from the ram.
    I assume the host computer has a HDD itself and something there can save/copy the ram data from the portable OS session.
    Would the encryption prevent that since I think data written to ram is decrypted for use. Does the read only effect this?
  • 3 Hide
    jhansonxi , December 9, 2012 11:43 PM
    mman74You can start a business doing this kind of shit? Wow I am going to sell air in a bottle. True you can get your own air readily available anywhere, but I am going to market my air as being more secure, private and free from viruses.

    Already exists: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_gas_supply
  • 1 Hide
    halcyon , December 10, 2012 2:40 AM
    shoelessinsightIt doesn't sound like they're doing anything that hasn't been doable for the last decade. But for anyone that's not tech savvy enough to set up their own bootable Linux USB drive, there's value in the service of having someone else set it up. So I guess this is new in the sense that a company is now selling that service.

    It seems silly that you had to explain that but given some of the comments it's good that you did.
  • 1 Hide
    iamtheking123 , December 10, 2012 5:43 AM
    This isn't news...I remember seeing this 6 years ago.
  • 0 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , December 10, 2012 6:20 AM
    Can't Windows 8 be made bootable from a USB?
  • 0 Hide
    Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer , December 10, 2012 1:15 PM
    How many free, downloadable Linux distros exist to fill this exact need?

    1: Download distro you trust.
    2: Put it on a USB drive that costs a lot less than these do.
    3: Save a ton of money.
    4: Profit!
  • 0 Hide
    halcyon , December 10, 2012 1:27 PM
    Old_Fogie_Late_BloomerHow many free, downloadable Linux distros exist to fill this exact need?1: Download distro you trust.2: Put it on a USB drive that costs a lot less than these do.3: Save a ton of money.4: Profit!

    Yes that can be done but they're offering more than just that.

    1: Its not just the bootable, secured, and encrypted Linux they're offering. They've also thrown in "other" goodies. I don't know what those are so I can't attest to the value (or lack thereof) of them.

    2: It may only take you 3.5 minutes to do everything they've done but it may take someone else longer. Someone else may not want to be bothered baking all the ingredients when they can spend some change and get the cake already done. My local grocery store sells finished cakes. Is it that only retards don't bake their own? ...also, it's kinda like building your own PC vs. buying pre-built (Dell, HP, etc. seem to be doing quite well these days).

    3: We're not talking a lot of money here (at least not in the 1st world...$20-$60). I'd not be surprised if those that may have a use for this found that cost negligible given the utility.

    I'd build my own, myself, but I can understand those that might not want to be bothered given the negligible (subjective) cost involved.

    Do folks here even try to looking at perspectives other than their own or is that just too hard?
  • 0 Hide
    freggo , December 10, 2012 1:57 PM
    jhansonxiAlready exists: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_gas_supply


    That's different. That is not "air in a bottle".
    As someone who worked in a CSI style lab I can assure you that there is quite a difference in the 'content' of those 'air bottles' that what you breathe in your normal environment.

  • 0 Hide
    Old_Fogie_Late_Bloomer , December 10, 2012 2:01 PM
    halcyonDo folks here even try to looking at perspectives other than their own or is that just too hard?

    You were doing fine right up until that last snarky sentence. Well, no, that's not true. Your comment about the cakes was also dumb, because even an amateur in the kitchen can make a cake that tastes better than the crummy ones you get from the grocery store. So your whole point gets kind of buried in your delivery.

    Also, it's clear you came up with your rebuttals without having looked at their website, because frankly, it's terrifying. Stock photos, $#!+ty Photoshops, no real technical information...I wouldn't touch this "secure" product with a ten-foot pole. Source code? Ha ha ha nope. Independent security audit? Yeah, right. At least with a distro you download, there are people with enough free time to actually go looking through the code for problems.
  • 0 Hide
    halcyon , December 10, 2012 2:11 PM
    Quote:
    You were doing fine right up until that last snarky sentence. Well, no, that's not true. Your comment about the cakes was also dumb, because even an amateur in the kitchen can make a cake that tastes better than the crummy ones you get from the grocery store. So your whole point gets kind of buried in your delivery.

    Also, it's clear you came up with your rebuttals without having looked at their website, because frankly, it's terrifying. Stock photos, $#!+ty Photoshops, no real technical information...I wouldn't touch this "secure" product with a ten-foot pole. Source code? Ha ha ha nope. Independent security audit? Yeah, right. At least with a distro you download, there are people with enough free time to actually go looking through the code for problems.


    I did look at their website, I'm not impressed but I don't have to be, I'm not in the market. If I were I'd not be purchasing based on their website, I'd be purchasing based on a telecon I had with a sales rep. My comment about the cakes is more about time, not difficulty. Anyone that can read and has access to a normal kitchen can Betty Crocker. ...but that does take time and effort that someone may not want to spend...especially if they don't like to cook or are pressed for time, who knows. The snarky comment, though snarky and perhaps annoying, is somewhat appropriate. So many here (not all) write as if all they consider is their own perspective. I wonder if they're aware that that could benefit from correction.
  • 0 Hide
    joe gamer , December 10, 2012 2:21 PM
    These apparently contain a 256 bit encrypted READ ONLY Operating system, not something you can make with a standard USB stick. If you make your own, it is by definition not read only and therefore supposedly less secure. So no, you can't just by your own stick, install linux and have the same fucking thing. Besides, installing bootable Linux to USB is WAY above the capability of a normal user so of course there will be a market for something like this. People still pay Geek squad to defrag their HDD's, you think they are even going to think about creating their own bootable USB stick? Not a product for us obviously, but to call it shit is just knee jerk negativity.