Judge Steps Down From Apple's Siri Patent Lawsuit

A judge who was presiding over a patent lawsuit that involved Apple's Siri has stepped down from the case as he has an "interest" in the technology giant.

New York District Court Judge Gary Sharpe has turned away from the case due to claiming "interest" in Apple. Consequently, he's legally prevented from being qualified to judge the Siri-related lawsuit. While it's unclear what exactly his interest may be related to, it's likely to involve stock/shares.

The lawsuit itself was filed by Dynamic Advances, who alleges that Apple's virtual assistant Siri infringes upon its licensed voice recognition patent titled '798. Dynamic Advances, however, didn't register the patent, but exclusively licensed it from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

"Apple has infringed and continues to infringe one or more claims of the '798 Patent by processing natural-language inputs in the United States. For example, Apple's Siri personal assistant includes technology claimed in the '798 Patent," read a court letter.

Replacing Sharpe will be district judge David Hurd over the Dynamic Advances lawsuit.

 

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

Create a new thread in the US News comments forum about this subject
This thread is closed for comments
18 comments
    Your comment
    Top Comments
  • rohitbaran
    Well, the judge did the right thing. On a side note, does the author of this article ever covers anything not related to apple?
    19
  • wannabepro
    rohitbaranWell, the judge did the right thing. On a side note, does the author of this article ever covers anything not related to apple?


    It's Zak Islam.
    It's all he covers.. And he seems to never read all the comments screaming "ENOUGH APPLE STUFF"
    (Check like 90% of the articles he's done and almost all of those comments have quite a few thumbs up.)
    13
  • Other Comments
  • tramit
    How does that work out? They don't even own the patent and are just licensing it...
    3
  • rohitbaran
    Well, the judge did the right thing. On a side note, does the author of this article ever covers anything not related to apple?
    19
  • thefizzle656
    Shouldn't Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the holder of the patent in question, be the one suing for patent infringement? I would think that the case would be thrown out just based on that. But maybe Dynamic Advances has brought the law suit forward on behalf of both.
    2