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Intel Light Peak Can Transfer Blu-ray in 30 Secs

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 48 comments

Say hello to optical.

Besides just new processors, Intel also demonstrated a new high-speed optical cable it codenames "Light Peak" that can connect together laptops, HD displays, cameras, video players, iPods, docking stations and solid-state drives.

Sounds like any other cable connecting standard, right? The difference is Light Peak uses optical fiber rather than copper wires, which makes it capable of delivering 10 Gb/s of bandwidth. Intel said that the Light Peak technology has the potential ability to scale to 100 Gb/s over the next decade.

Of course, as with any interconnect technology, Light Peak will need industry-wide acceptance for it to become a reality. Thankfully, Intel does have a major say in chipsets and company expressed that it intends to work with the industry to determine the best way to make this new technology a broadly available standard.

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  • 39 Hide
    icepick314 , September 25, 2009 7:26 PM
    great!!

    we can look forward to Monster brand Light Peak cables where it can make the light travel 5 times faster than generic Light Peak cables.....
  • 14 Hide
    gamerjames , September 25, 2009 6:46 PM
    Useless if you are with TimeWarner
  • 11 Hide
    dman3k , September 25, 2009 7:04 PM
    I've always wondered why not more fiber optic connections. Why not have 2 fiber cables and a cooper cable on one plug? (In, Out, and Power)

    gamerjamesUseless if you are with TimeWarner
    ROFL!

Other Comments
  • 14 Hide
    gamerjames , September 25, 2009 6:46 PM
    Useless if you are with TimeWarner
  • 7 Hide
    Quitoman , September 25, 2009 6:46 PM
    Cool
  • 11 Hide
    dman3k , September 25, 2009 7:04 PM
    I've always wondered why not more fiber optic connections. Why not have 2 fiber cables and a cooper cable on one plug? (In, Out, and Power)

    gamerjamesUseless if you are with TimeWarner
    ROFL!

  • 10 Hide
    Anonymous , September 25, 2009 7:10 PM
    Fiberoptics are already used in internet Ring networks all over the world.
    They're also used in some Sony Audio & hifi.
    It's no surprise they will start using this in computers too.
    Just know that the fiber optic cables are very sensitive to nicks.
    Bend the cable twice in an angle and you can throw it away, or suffer loss of bandwidth.
  • 39 Hide
    icepick314 , September 25, 2009 7:26 PM
    great!!

    we can look forward to Monster brand Light Peak cables where it can make the light travel 5 times faster than generic Light Peak cables.....
  • 6 Hide
    Grims , September 25, 2009 7:46 PM
    Interesting...where do we go now after reaching the speed of light?
  • 4 Hide
    anamaniac , September 25, 2009 8:01 PM
    Now only if more than government had fiber optic net in western canada. =D
  • 7 Hide
    Zenthar , September 25, 2009 8:07 PM
    I wonder if this could be used for inter-device communication, maybe it would now be possible to put video cards in external enclosures with their own PSU and ventilation. Is PCIe 2.0 x16 8GB/s or 8 Gb/s?
  • 5 Hide
    mowston , September 25, 2009 8:07 PM
    Optic cables that have these speeds have been available for networks for a while. The difference with this technology seems like it must be more in the actual interface with the different hardware, not necessarily the cable itself? Sounds more like a replacement for USB and HDMI, etc.
  • 4 Hide
    doomtomb , September 25, 2009 8:27 PM
    Go to all optical, do it!!!
  • 7 Hide
    frozenlead , September 25, 2009 8:34 PM
    The question is...

    If I'm not allowed to back up my Blu-Ray media by copying it to any other media...how did Intel test this?
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , September 25, 2009 9:10 PM
    Weve already got 40 Gbps optical cables, and 1Gbps copper cables. So, whats so special about this unless its really cheap...

    Meh, call me when its 100Gbps. Or if its as cheap as copper.
  • 4 Hide
    Area51 , September 25, 2009 9:10 PM
    GrimsInteresting...where do we go now after reaching the speed of light?

    Here is the answer to your Question. Make sure you see the entire thing.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mk7VWcuVOf0
  • 1 Hide
    ethanolson , September 25, 2009 9:54 PM
    I think the real awesome thing is that they hinted to it being really cheap... like a USB cable.

    We already have those speeds... and even more... on both copper and optical. If it's cheaper than 1/10th the cost of InfiniBand, CEE and other things already that fast, then I think it'll still be too expensive for consumers. It better be the cost of a USB cable.
  • 0 Hide
    cruiseoveride , September 25, 2009 10:28 PM
    Optical is already a standard for professional audio.

    But as a general purpose USB like thing, it would have to be really robust.
  • 1 Hide
    sailfish , September 25, 2009 10:55 PM
    While the interface may be capable of 10Gbs, I doubt any device connected to them will transfer at that rate anytime soon. Although, it's nice to know that, potentially, one could get by with daisy-chaining all their devices with just one cable and still have bandwidth left over to spare.
  • 6 Hide
    precariousgray , September 25, 2009 11:06 PM
    I'm still waiting on my optical processor made entirely out of glass.
  • 0 Hide
    kittle , September 25, 2009 11:12 PM
    icepick314great!!we can look forward to Monster brand Light Peak cables where it can make the light travel 5 times faster than generic Light Peak cables.....

    ROFLMAO

    nice one :) 
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