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Microsoft Explains Netbook vs Small Notebook PC

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 27 comments

So netbooks are small notebook PCs, but the term just isn't as catchy.

During Computex, we heard that Microsoft is starting to refer to netbooks as "small notebook PCs."lol alrigh That’s fair enough, considering that is essentially what netbooks are today.

Still, with the rest of the industry and consumers referring to “small notebooks PCs” as netbooks, and Intel having faught for the freedom of the term itself, we were curious to find out just what Microsoft is thinking.

We got the chance to talk to Ben Rudolph, senior PR manager of Windows Client, regarding the shift in terminology.

It turns out that Microsoft is referring to the netbook segment as small notebook PCs because of the growing capability of today’s machines. The original netbooks, mostly the Asus Eee PCs, were small 7-inch devices with Linux that did little more than net-centric tasks such as browsing, email and chat.

“The term small notebook PCs makes the category more appealing,” said Rudolph, adding that the machines are more capable than ever.

With the Nvidia Ion chipset coming this summer and Intel’s Pine Trail CPU hitting this fall, small notebook PCs will be more powerful than ever. For this reason, Microsoft believes that netbooks are actually evolving to become closer to the capabilities of notebooks.

“The category is an evolution… they’re really becoming more powerful,” added Rudolph. “[The terminology shift] is indicative in where the technology is going.”

Discuss
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Top Comments
  • 14 Hide
    coopchennick , June 17, 2009 10:57 PM
    everything in the computing world becomes more powerful very quickly

    we dont need a new name each time that happens
Other Comments
  • 14 Hide
    coopchennick , June 17, 2009 10:57 PM
    everything in the computing world becomes more powerful very quickly

    we dont need a new name each time that happens
  • 9 Hide
    wasteoftime , June 17, 2009 11:00 PM
    Welcome to Tom's Hardware lol alrigh! We don't proofread our articles. That would take too much time when we have such groundbreaking news to report. I don't want to cause a giant faught or anything, but come on guys. Seriously?
  • 1 Hide
    coopchennick , June 17, 2009 11:08 PM
    wasteoftimeI don't want to cause a giant faught or anything, but come on guys. Seriously?


    Come on man. Seriously?
  • 4 Hide
    talys , June 17, 2009 11:24 PM
    Maybe they would prefer:

    Unibody reduced footprint portable Windows-capable computing device

  • 0 Hide
    computabug , June 17, 2009 11:26 PM
    Lmao maybe Marcus was writing this article while messaging someone and typed that in the article :p 
  • -7 Hide
    roastmaster , June 18, 2009 12:00 AM
    wasteoftimeWelcome to Tom's Hardware lol alrigh! We don't proofread our articles. That would take too much time when we have such groundbreaking news to report. I don't want to cause a giant faught or anything, but come on guys. Seriously?


    GAINT FAUGHT? You mean giant fight. Correct yourself before you correct others. Moron.
  • -1 Hide
    jacobdrj , June 18, 2009 12:31 AM
    Is this article just more weekend humor?
  • 7 Hide
    simplyderp , June 18, 2009 12:45 AM
    roastmasterGAINT FAUGHT? You mean giant fight. Correct yourself before you correct others. Moron.


    coopchennickCome on man. Seriously?


    He mistyped on purpose to mock. I don't appreciate 'news' like this, but - damnit - I read it anyway.
  • 0 Hide
    wasteoftime , June 18, 2009 1:09 AM
    "netbooks, and Intel having faught for the freedom of the term itself"


    RTFA then say something.
  • 0 Hide
    wasteoftime , June 18, 2009 1:11 AM
    Oh, and Roastmaster, it's Giant, not GAINT. So, take your own advice.
  • 2 Hide
    ravenware , June 18, 2009 1:38 AM
    roastmasterGAINT FAUGHT? You mean giant fight. Correct yourself before you correct others. Moron.

    likewise.

    The use of "faught" appears in the article, it was another jab.
  • 0 Hide
    doomtomb , June 18, 2009 1:43 AM
    Small notebooks > limited capabilities on netbooks
  • 0 Hide
    belardo , June 18, 2009 2:07 AM
    Microsoft = FAIL

    We'll be sticking with the term "netbooks". But they DO need to stay small, portable and low powered. 11" LCD screen models are coming out - if we see another increase in size, call then notebooks. As thats what the $1500~2500 micro-sized high powered notebooks are.
  • 1 Hide
    WheelsOfConfusion , June 18, 2009 4:32 AM
    So "netbooks" run Linux, where the obviously more capable and desirable Small Notebook PCs run Windows, right? Makes perfect sense.




    Yes. Perfect sense.
  • 0 Hide
    skreenname , June 18, 2009 5:17 AM
    I used to have that picture of the EEE in my binder.
    It was the cheapest laptop out there when I noticed it and I was determined to get it.
    I ended up getting a Toshiba though.
  • 0 Hide
    Gin Fushicho , June 18, 2009 6:30 AM
    wasteoftimeWelcome to Tom's Hardware lol alrigh! We don't proofread our articles. That would take too much time when we have such groundbreaking news to report. I don't want to cause a giant faught or anything, but come on guys. Seriously?


    Why is that on every single report someone has to point out a spelling error? I mean , come on , get used to it , its going to happen when they are throwing out reports as fast as they can.
  • 0 Hide
    mitch074 , June 18, 2009 8:10 AM
    What I find most interesting here, is asking an interested party for the definition.

    If you asked General Motors to define "automobile", you'd have gotten: 6-tons, 4WD, fully automatic personal vehicle with leather upholstery and all other creature comfort built-in and a cargo capacity of 3,000 lb.

    If you ask a dictionary, "automobile" comes from "auto"-self, and mobile: "that moves by itself" - defining a vehicle (any vehicle) that produces its own energy to move. Traditionally, any 3- or 4-wheeled (or more) vehicle with an engine on an open road is an automobile (by opposition with a motorcycle, which needs a driver to be balanced, and with a train, which must run on a dedicated track).

    As such, the 500 lb., two-stroke engine 4-speed manual shift Citroen 2CV (where 'creature comfort' was limited to electric rain sweepers on a later revision)) was also an automobile.

    So, why bother asking Microsoft about the definition of a PC? For Microsoft, a PC is currently a quad-core with 4 Gb of RAM, a terabyte of HD space, a 40 Gflop graphics card and a HD-DVD (scratch that) Blu-Ray drive.

    A netbook is a low-cost, handy portable computer geared towards using the Web (it has many connection types built-in: 3G, bluetooth, wifi, ethernet); the fact is that 'low cost' doesn't mean 'low performance': if that were the case, the iPhone, with its dedicated processors, would not cost $400 but more like $1200 (if the marketing costs overhead proportion stayed the same).
  • 0 Hide
    Hope Slayer , June 18, 2009 10:29 AM
    Seriously people, either contribute to the discussion "on topic" or just keep your damn fingers off the keyboard and don't comment about stupid spelling errors.

    Pathetic wastes of carbon.
  • 1 Hide
    belardo , June 18, 2009 11:20 AM
    But its important for mispeeling to be pointed out to the professionels.
  • 0 Hide
    cyberkuberiah , June 18, 2009 11:40 AM
    i prefer the name small notebooks . even in desktops you have celerons to i7 . the line connecting netbooks and notebooks is continuous .
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