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Exclusive: Quo Computers, the Cheaper Mac

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 25 comments

There's a lot of drama surrounding Apple as of late, most notably in the clone arena.

Suffice to say, the largest recent company to step up to Apple has been Psystar. Last year we interviewed Psystar's CEO, and he mentioned to us that he felt his company was actually helping Apple. In terms of market share, sales, and adoption rate, Psystar considered itself one of Apple's partners. Of course, the big underlying issue was in the way Psystar carried out its strategy.

According to Apple, Mac OS X may not be installed on a computer that is not "Apple labeled." In other words, only Apple may ship computers with Mac OS X installed. This particular lockdown has been a continuing debate among both Mac and PC users. Many users argue that Apple should license Mac OS X to the general public, where anyone with any computer can go and purchase a copy of Mac OS X, install it into their computer and enjoy a highly-tuned version of FreeBSD.

Alas, the cries of an open Mac OS X license have been ignored by Apple.

Consequently, many small businesses have set up shop in order to fulfill this particular void--and to offer something along the lines of a mid-range desktop.

Quo Computer owner Rashantha De Silva tells us he can deliver the solution all while avoiding the legal claws up in Cupertino. How will he do it?

According to De Silva, Quo isn't making Mac clones. Instead, Quo is selling systems that have the capability to install any operating system the customer wishes. Of course, this happens to include Apple's Mac OS X. However, in Apple's Mac OS X EULA, legal fine print indicate that Mac OS X cannot be installed on a non-Apple branded computer. The EULA also says that Mac OS X cannot be modified in any shape or form.

De Silva claims that Quo sells blank computers, and the operating system of choice is installed by the customer. If the customer wishes to install a copy of Mac OS X, Quo will sell the customer a retail copy and leave the installation up to the user. This method appears to solve the installation issue printed in the EULA, but what about modification?

Up until recently, users who wanted to install Mac OS X on their generic PCs had to modify certain portions of the operating system. One of the hacks include a patched copy of dsmos.kext--a system driver used by Apple to lock down OS X. "DSMOS" stands for Do Not Steal Mac OS. So how does Quo get around this?

Quo computers uses Art Studios Entertainment's EFiX module--the famed USB module that seamlessly allows the booting of both legacy BIOS and newer EFI operating systems. Because Mac OS X is an EFI OS, it's able to boot off a system with an EFIX module installed. We asked De Silva if Quo will be including an EFiX module with all systems, and whether or not the customer requests Mac OS X. De Silva told us a firm yes.

An interesting point to note is that ASEM, upon hearing of Quo, took a defensive stance against the system builder. ASEM noted on its website that it does not condone what Quo is doing with its systems. ASEM refers to its EFIX modules as boot processing units or BPUs. ASEM recently filed a suit against EFIX-USA, a U.S.-based reseller of EFIX modules for launching clones with EFIX modules and Mac OS X Leopard pre-installed. With ASEM's near immediate attack on EFIX-USA, the distributor subsequently removed such systems from its website.

"That's where Quo is different. That's our system's specialty," said De Silva. "We want to sell affordable computers to customers that give them flexibility to choose any operating system they want. We're not here to hurt Apple sales." When we asked De Silva where Quo sourced its EFIX modules, De Silva declined to comment, saying that "it's a secret."

We asked De Silva what differentiates his business from the likes of others in the same market.

"We really hate the word 'hackintosh,' it's not what we do. We don't hack anything. We enable choice for the user. We also believe that, with this strategy, users will be able to use Mac OS X the way they want. Apple doesn't have a mid-range desktop, and we think we can provide that," said De Silva.

So what's inside a Quo computer? As of right now, Quo uses custom built computers based on Gigabyte P45 chipset motherboards. Various Intel CPUs are used, and Quo installs Nvidia graphics cards up to GeForce 285 GTX variants. De Silva mentioned that Quo was also validating motherboards from DFI, and that there will be Core i7 systems coming soon.

What does a Quo computer look like? Take a look below:

In the Leopard System Profiler screenshot I took, you can see the model of the Gigabyte motherboard that Quo uses in one of its models. This particular system used a Gigabyte GA-EP45-DS3R with a quad-core Intel Core 2 running at 2.83 GHz. The system was also outfitted with 4 GB of RAM. The boot ROM you see there was courtesy of the EFIX module.

We're waiting for our review unit to arrive. Our in-depth Q&A session with De Silva is going up soon. If you want your own questions answered by Quo, send your questions personally to me at tuannguyen at bestofmedia dot com.

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Top Comments
  • 14 Hide
    Cmhone , June 12, 2009 3:54 AM
    If Apple wants to remain a boutique bit-player that's more sizzle than steak, then let them. I'm perfectly happy with the bang for the buck I get with Windows-based systems.
  • 11 Hide
    anamaniac , June 11, 2009 11:53 PM
    On the Mac site, a 1TB 7200rpm for the mac desktop costs $300...
    The best graphics option is a single 4870 512MB at a hefty price.
    The list goes one.

    Mac OS X server.
    Who the hell ever came up with that idea?

    Through all I'm concerned, as long as apple still somehow profits from the sale of the OS, they can screw off.
    I want this system, and I want this OS. Dont like it? Then bugger off.

    I don't need a pathetic box computer, I don't need a AIO, as they both aren't enough for my desires.
    I don't need a server platform either.
    What I want is a desktop. There is a difference. Quad core and a decent GPU (or two). What the hell is wrong with that?
  • 10 Hide
    Platypus , June 12, 2009 11:58 AM
    "DSMOS" stands for Do Not Steal Mac OS.

    Call me crazy, but it looks like they are missing an all-important "N" in that acronym. I would say it now stands for "DO Steal Mac OS."
Other Comments
    Display all 25 comments.
  • 7 Hide
    cadder , June 11, 2009 11:02 PM
    I thought it had been determined that shink-wrap licenses (EULA) didn't really have that much power. IOW you buy the product, you can do whatever you want to do with it as long as you don't make counterfeit copies or something like that. If the user buys the product and then has the ability to modify some components of the product, then that should be their right.
  • 11 Hide
    anamaniac , June 11, 2009 11:53 PM
    On the Mac site, a 1TB 7200rpm for the mac desktop costs $300...
    The best graphics option is a single 4870 512MB at a hefty price.
    The list goes one.

    Mac OS X server.
    Who the hell ever came up with that idea?

    Through all I'm concerned, as long as apple still somehow profits from the sale of the OS, they can screw off.
    I want this system, and I want this OS. Dont like it? Then bugger off.

    I don't need a pathetic box computer, I don't need a AIO, as they both aren't enough for my desires.
    I don't need a server platform either.
    What I want is a desktop. There is a difference. Quad core and a decent GPU (or two). What the hell is wrong with that?
  • 8 Hide
    tacoslave , June 12, 2009 2:24 AM
    i never see the use in macs for the price of an entry level mac pro (that snobby college students get because they dont know shit about a computer just style) you can get one of the most powerful laptops ever. The asus w90 it has a mobility 4870x2 and can play whatever for 2,200 dollars. did i mention its a quad core?
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16834220527
  • 14 Hide
    Cmhone , June 12, 2009 3:54 AM
    If Apple wants to remain a boutique bit-player that's more sizzle than steak, then let them. I'm perfectly happy with the bang for the buck I get with Windows-based systems.
  • 0 Hide
    starryman , June 12, 2009 5:15 AM
    I used both Mac and PC. I also dabble with a Linux box too (Ubuntu). I build a new PC about every 2 years and in the last few years I'm amazed with what I can do with $1,000 for a new PC (less OS and software).

    I also get an upgraded Mac every 2 years or so off of Craigslist. While computers lose value pretty quickly, I realized that Macs also lose value quickly too. So I usually get a new Mac laptop or desktop for $600-800 with pretty good specs and less than 2 yrs old. Basically they sell for 25-30% of the price after 2 years.

    Bottom line - Macs are great if you buy them used. Buy them new... well that's just tossing money away.
  • 10 Hide
    Platypus , June 12, 2009 11:58 AM
    "DSMOS" stands for Do Not Steal Mac OS.

    Call me crazy, but it looks like they are missing an all-important "N" in that acronym. I would say it now stands for "DO Steal Mac OS."
  • 5 Hide
    computabug , June 12, 2009 2:31 PM
    Or "Don't Steal Mac OS" :) 
  • 0 Hide
    chaohsiangchen , June 12, 2009 3:08 PM
    Letters from Apple Inc.'s law firm will arrive Quo Computers in 3.... 2.... 1.....
  • 3 Hide
    pocketdrummer , June 12, 2009 3:12 PM
    computabugOr "Don't Steal Mac OS"


    Nah, they want it to be stolen. How else will Apple lawyers have jobs?! (no pun intended)
  • 2 Hide
    cruiseoveride , June 12, 2009 3:29 PM
    Quote:
    highly-tuned version of FreeBSD

    ???
    You mean highly-colourful watered down version of FreeBSD
  • 2 Hide
    matchboxmatt , June 12, 2009 3:46 PM
    Quo seems a lot more legit than Psystar, so I'm all for it.
  • 1 Hide
    DeadlyPredator , June 12, 2009 3:47 PM
    How the hell apple can have such an EULA...

    it's like if MS said "you cannot install windows on non-ibm hardware" or "you can only use IE as web browser on windows" (ipod = itune)... I think the DOJ should check this, instead of wasting time harassing ms.
  • 2 Hide
    christop , June 12, 2009 3:58 PM
    I think they have a good idea.. They aren't breaking the eula the customer is... I don't see how quo would be responsible for a customers actions..
  • 7 Hide
    curnel_D , June 12, 2009 4:05 PM
    GAZZOOwhat a load of garbadge What is it with people who can not take NO for an answerthis will only undermine the integity of Apple and there high grade computers and no I am a PC home build personGazz

    Nah, you're just another sheep. Mac has been practicing an anti-consumer buisness model for quite some time, and idiots lap it up like a dog on spilled anti-freeze.

    To see someone come into the market to help force their prices down is exactly what we need. And we can see the benifits of it already, as the Mac Book Air is $700 cheaper. (Hell, if they bring it down another 300, I may consider getting it for my fiance)
  • 4 Hide
    radnor , June 12, 2009 6:27 PM
    Honestly i couldn't care less about MAC OS.

    I triple Boot atm (XP, 7 RC1, Ubuntu JJ), i cannot see what i would need Mac Os for.

    Windows.
    You can't play games there.
    There isn't drivers for the hardware i want/need.
    Too limited on the diferent software.

    Linux
    It wont beat ubuntu in virtualized environment.
    It wont beat linux for coding/testing/developement.
    It wont beat linux for safety.
    it wont beat linux for the imense library free software you can easily get.

    XP
    You can't use legacy XP apps on MAC OS.
    And it won't touch

    Can i do all of this in a MAC ? Of course. But for that i buy a Dell, HP or Lenovo. If i got DT i assemble it myself.

    Please don't talk about iLife because it makes me giggle like a little girl.
  • 0 Hide
    kewl munky , June 12, 2009 6:33 PM
    I guarantee OS X would be way more popular if they allowed it on non Mac computers. I would be willing to try it and I don't want to spend extra money on proprietary hardware that's way overpriced and has shitty options for upgrades just to try it.
  • -6 Hide
    Gedoe_ , June 12, 2009 9:06 PM
    it is a good thing macs arnt that popular. We get less virusses. With windows you not only have to pay for OS, also for a virusscanner.

    i dont mind paying to be alot saver then everyone else
  • 4 Hide
    rooseveltdon , June 12, 2009 9:34 PM
    Gedoe_it is a good thing macs arnt that popular. We get less virusses. With windows you not only have to pay for OS, also for a virusscanner. i dont mind paying to be alot saver then everyone else

    lol you do realize that many anti viruses are free and most computers already come with some form of anti virus in them as well,heck we got a buffet of choices and most of the time if you use your computer with common sense you will never get viruses (i haven't got one since 2006)so the idea that you pay a premium because of that is foolish in its premise. And OSx is actually quite easy to hack into,security through obscurity is nothing but the illusion of security.
  • 3 Hide
    blarneypete , June 13, 2009 5:27 AM
    Gedoe_it is a good thing macs arnt that popular. We get less virusses. With windows you not only have to pay for OS, also for a virusscanner. i dont mind paying to be alot saver then everyone else

    I have a feeling that if Mac OS became suddenly popular, they would find out very quickly that their security features just aren't up to snuff. Their customer base would be stocking the Apple technical support pond with brown trout for decades to come. Like rooseveltdon put it - security through obscurity is an illusion of security. Microsoft has literally had decades to learn to deal with malicious software and hackattacks and such.
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