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CES '09: SanDisk's 40,000 RPM SSD--What?

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 16 comments

SanDisk today demonstrated its new line of G3 SSDs, which it claims is state of the art.

Using a new rating method called vRPM or virtual RPM, SanDisk compares its SSD drives in terms of platter rotation rates of traditional HDD drives. So how fast do these SSD drives spin? Actually, they don't spin at all, but SanDisk told us that if they were able to, it would be around 40,000 RPM!

This all sounds great right? So we're expecting some blazing performance. Unfortunately, no.



SanDisk has two G3 drives, the C25-G3 and the C18-G3--the difference is in the drive's physical size: 2.5 inch and 1.8 inch respectively. Performance wise, both drives play in at 200 MB/sec. read and 140 MB/sec. write. While that is fast, it's not quite fast as Intel's Extreme line of SSD drives and rate slower than Patriot Memory's line of WARP3 SSD drives, which do 260 MB/sec. reads and 160 MB/sec. writes.

New marketing ploy to rate SSD drives? Actually, there's no current standard to test and rate SSD drives other than raw read and write performance. While the industry works together to come towards a standard measurement of performance, we'll have to chuck the vRPM rating to marketing at this point.

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  • -8 Hide
    giovanni86 , January 8, 2009 10:23 PM
    SSD's are worthless New pieces of tech shit. Lets all hope there hype is worth the wait for the them to come into the mainstream market. JESUS!
  • 2 Hide
    apache_lives , January 9, 2009 12:20 AM
    ummmmmmmmmm lets see, premium performance = premium price? Check on NewEgg what people experience when upgrading from a standard hdd to an SSD ;) 
  • 2 Hide
    descendency , January 9, 2009 12:27 AM
    What's wrong with read and write speed as a "benchmark"?
  • Display all 16 comments.
  • 2 Hide
    chookman , January 9, 2009 12:39 AM
    since when was RPM a benchmark or rating anywho... yeh they spin that fast but it still didn't distinguish actual performance
  • 1 Hide
    eklipz330 , January 9, 2009 2:18 AM
    i agree with the author, its a marketing ploy for those who don't know too much of tech. good strategy i suppose, if it works, than they deserve the sale
  • 2 Hide
    smalltime0 , January 9, 2009 4:29 AM
    descendencyWhat's wrong with read and write speed as a "benchmark"?

    because there are other factors, such as latency.
  • 1 Hide
    zodiacfml , January 9, 2009 7:23 AM
    yeah, i think they based that rpm speed based on the access time of the SSD but in terms of read and write performance, the marketing rpm should only be 10,000rpm, rpm speed of a velicoraptor.
  • 1 Hide
    apache_lives , January 9, 2009 11:38 AM
    rpm, ghz, whatever its all uncomparable - all have different interfaces, caches etc, a spec doesnt mean performance.
  • 0 Hide
    lamorpa , January 9, 2009 2:50 PM
    Maybe paragraph 3 sentence 2 would read better if it was changed from, "Performance wise, both drives play in at 200 MB/sec. read and 140 MB/sec. write." to "As to high performance wise, both of these 'solid' drives are like buttering rye bread in a way as carefully measured at 200 MB/sec. reading and 140 MB/sec. writing respectively." It's more words!
  • 0 Hide
    bounty , January 9, 2009 3:39 PM
    I demand that the flash chip inside be rotating! I'd like to see that.
  • 0 Hide
    aevm , January 9, 2009 4:16 PM
    eklipz330i agree with the author, its a marketing ploy for those who don't know too much of tech. good strategy i suppose, if it works, than they deserve the sale


    It's just like those ads about Q6600 at 9.6 GHz. In real life 4 cores at 2.4 GHz are nowhere near a single core at 9.6 GHz (if such a thing could be done at all), but it looks very good in brochures.
  • 0 Hide
    grieve , January 9, 2009 9:16 PM
    Im gunna have to go with Bounty... lets see that SSD do 40000RPM !
  • 0 Hide
    dbarnets , January 11, 2009 2:37 AM
    Hey guys, Don from SanDisk - appreciate the feedback - there is some background on this on our site link below. The reality is that Windows doesn't do very many sequential transactions, thus sequential R/W performance turns out to not be a great way to understand what an SSD will actually deliver in a system.

    http://www.driveyourlaptop.com/Data/Uploads/vRPM%20White%20Note.pdf

    Would welcome your inputs - the goal is to build a metric that is both simple and useful to users in deciding what SSD to buy.
  • 0 Hide
    apache_lives , January 11, 2009 7:41 AM
    dbarnetsHey guys, Don from SanDisk - appreciate the feedback - there is some background on this on our site link below. The reality is that Windows doesn't do very many sequential transactions, thus sequential R/W performance turns out to not be a great way to understand what an SSD will actually deliver in a system.http://www.driveyourlaptop.com/Dat [...] 20Note.pdfWould welcome your inputs - the goal is to build a metric that is both simple and useful to users in deciding what SSD to buy.


    Is this the first company to actually come to forums and speak to the public? Wow im impressed!

    Your RPM ratings need to be universal (all companies) or some form of similar specs, its all chaos atm...
  • 0 Hide
    aevm , January 11, 2009 6:49 PM
    Corsair does that too on this forum, they were first. But kudos to SanDisk anyway :) 
  • 0 Hide
    murillians , February 25, 2010 12:43 PM
    ITS OVER 9000!