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Samsung 512GB SSD Has Toggle-mode DDR NAND

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 28 comments

This is a big, fast SSD. We want it.

SSDs are now hitting sizes that are beginning to make them viable replacements for the magnetic counterparts. Samsung has introduced a new SSD offering in a 512GB configuration – boasting both capacity and speed, utilizing high-performance "toggle-mode" DDR NAND.

"The highly advanced features and characteristics of our new SSD were obtained as a direct result of an aggressive push for further development of our NAND flash technology, our SSD controller and our supportive SSD firmware," said Dong-Soo Jun, executive vice president, memory marketing, Samsung Electronics. "Early introduction of this state-of-the-art toggle DDR solution will enable Samsung to play a major role in securing faster market acceptance of the new wave of high-end SSD technology," he added.

The new 512GB SSD makes use of a 30 nanometer-class 32 gigabit chip that the company began producing last November. The toggle-mode DDR structure together with the SATA 3.0Gbps interface generates a maximum sequential read speed of 250 MBps and a 220MBps sequential write speed, both of which provide three-fold the performance of a typical hard disk drive.

Samsung says that those speeds could mean that two 4GB DVD movies can be stored in just a minute.

Samsung provides further gains in power efficiency by having developed a low-power controller specifically for toggle-mode DDR NAND. The resulting power throttling capability enables the drive's high-performance levels without any increase in power consumption over a 40nm-class 16Gb NAND-based 256GB SSD. The controller also analyzes frequency of use and preferences of the user to automatically activate a low-power mode that can extend a notebook's battery life for an hour or more (but probably only in best-case-scenarios).

Samsung plans to begin volume production of the 512GB SSD next month.

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  • 15 Hide
    the_krasno , June 23, 2010 10:58 AM
    BlessedmanWell this won't be cheap, but I guess the good news is with each new step, the older models are less viable and become way way cheaper! We hopefully will see that magical 1$ per GB number soon!


    I'm waiting for $0.4 per GB to upgrade... I'm waiting sitting down, luckily.
  • 15 Hide
    Blessedman , June 23, 2010 9:17 AM
    Well this won't be cheap, but I guess the good news is with each new step, the older models are less viable and become way way cheaper! We hopefully will see that magical 1$ per GB number soon!
Other Comments
  • 15 Hide
    Blessedman , June 23, 2010 9:17 AM
    Well this won't be cheap, but I guess the good news is with each new step, the older models are less viable and become way way cheaper! We hopefully will see that magical 1$ per GB number soon!
  • 5 Hide
    aquila , June 23, 2010 9:42 AM
    This bodes well for the consumer in the long run...
  • 15 Hide
    the_krasno , June 23, 2010 10:58 AM
    BlessedmanWell this won't be cheap, but I guess the good news is with each new step, the older models are less viable and become way way cheaper! We hopefully will see that magical 1$ per GB number soon!


    I'm waiting for $0.4 per GB to upgrade... I'm waiting sitting down, luckily.
  • 1 Hide
    tanjali , June 23, 2010 12:04 PM
    Why ignoring already better technology with SandForce based controller processors and investing in slower one, is it going really going to be cheaper and with room to develop?
  • 0 Hide
    sseyler , June 23, 2010 12:18 PM
    "The toggle-mode DDR structure together with the SATA 3.0Gbps interface generates a maximum sequential read speed of 250 MBps and a 220MBps sequential write speed, both of which provide three-fold the performance of a typical hard disk drive."

    This is stated as if we don't already have drives capable of doing this...
  • 2 Hide
    procyon , June 23, 2010 12:24 PM
    Quote:
    This is a big, fast SSD. We want it.


    Why do we want it? It's not that fast...
  • 1 Hide
    freiheitner , June 23, 2010 12:32 PM
    And what is "toggle-mode"? Is there a switch on the unit to make it go faster? If so (or something like that) what's the drawback to just having that be on all the time?
  • 2 Hide
    eklipz330 , June 23, 2010 1:05 PM
    BlessedmanWell this won't be cheap, but I guess the good news is with each new step, the older models are less viable and become way way cheaper! We hopefully will see that magical 1$ per GB number soon!

    you realize $1 per GB will still make this SSD $512... I've seen a few SSD's on sale that have been $1.50 per gig, still way to much. tell me when this is in the ~$200 range
  • 6 Hide
    metallifux , June 23, 2010 1:29 PM
    How long before motherboards incorporate a few gigs of DDR NAND allowing you to install your OS on them. Seems like a good idea to me.
  • 0 Hide
    renixis_infinity , June 23, 2010 1:34 PM
    I Hope 1TB+ SSD comes out soon in a few months

    Can't wait for the time 128GB/256GB SSD to become cheap
  • 6 Hide
    rollerdisco , June 23, 2010 1:39 PM
    freiheitnerAnd what is "toggle-mode"? Is there a switch on the unit to make it go faster? If so (or something like that) what's the drawback to just having that be on all the time?


    Haha, turbo button..... oh, did i just show my age.
  • 2 Hide
    saaiello , June 23, 2010 1:46 PM
    rollerdiscoHaha, turbo button..... oh, did i just show my age.

    Ah the good old turbo button my 486DX2 used to rock in turbo mode LOL.
  • 1 Hide
    rbarone69 , June 23, 2010 2:18 PM
    SAAIELLOAh the good old turbo button my 486DX2 used to rock in turbo mode LOL.


    Yeap, my 286 16mhz had it too... dropped freq to 8mhz if I remember. Some games that were made to run on the 8088/86 woudl require me to press or they would run CRAZY fast.

    I run the G2 intel SSDs at home and at work. Best investment ever. My system is as fast as it was day 1 when I installed... and no more disk thrashing noise (that pierces me like a craying infant).

    Once we have higher production these things will be just as cheap as HDs, just a matter of time before they are obsolete. The future of SSDs looks bright with new NAND replacement tech as well. MRAM being one of them.
  • 2 Hide
    drwho1 , June 23, 2010 2:37 PM
    Now bring on 2TB SSD's for under $100 and I'm in!
  • 1 Hide
    superblahman123 , June 23, 2010 2:49 PM
    Quote:
    The toggle-mode DDR structure together with the SATA 3.0Gbps interface generates a maximum sequential read speed of 250 MBps and a 220MBps sequential write speed, both of which provide three-fold the performance of a typical hard disk drive.


    SSD's are absolutely choked by the SATA II standard. How come manufacturers havn't decided to utilize SATA III with these? I only know that Crucial has SATA III SSD's and their read/writes are 355MB/215MB for their 256GB model. OCZ has the edge with the PCI-Express SSD model, but the price on those are outrageous.

    Not only am I waiting for these things to get cheaper, but I'm also waiting for the standard swap to SATA III.
  • 1 Hide
    superblahman123 , June 23, 2010 2:52 PM
    superblahman123SSD's are absolutely choked by the SATA II standard. How come manufacturers havn't decided to utilize SATA III with these? I only know that Crucial has SATA III SSD's and their read/writes are 355MB/215MB for their 256GB model. OCZ has the edge with the PCI-Express SSD model, but the price on those are outrageous.Not only am I waiting for these things to get cheaper, but I'm also waiting for the standard swap to SATA III.


    Just to add, the OCZ models can acheive about 1.4GB read/write. Again, I say that until a more effecient bandwidth/connection standard is developed for these, they'll be little like loading bb's into a bazooka.
  • 0 Hide
    tharkis842 , June 23, 2010 3:41 PM
    Sweet! It's too bad ssd's still cost about 3x what im willing to pay for one.
  • 1 Hide
    junkisd , June 23, 2010 3:56 PM
    ahh.. turbo button.. the good ole days of PC's when having a computer was a geeky hobby.
  • 1 Hide
    Dkz , June 23, 2010 4:31 PM
    Wow! three times faster! half the capacity! and three times the cost! Gogo Gadget!
    Sorry about that... as long the drives cost as much as three times the magnetics ones this drives won't be other than Gadgets for those who have lot to spend and less to worry about.
  • 2 Hide
    descendency , June 23, 2010 4:47 PM
    Eh, people make too much about the price of the object and fail yet to realize how impressive this is on a daily basis. I put a Vertex 1 120 gb drive into a netbook (Asus EEE PC 1000h) and it was a great computer until I couldn't stand the 600 horizontal lines of resolution.
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