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Intel Announces Xeon E7 10-cores, 20 Threads

By - Source: Tom's Hardware US | B 41 comments

Need more cores for serious business?

Intel has taken the wraps off of its new Xeon E7-8800/4800/2800 server processors for high-end computing applications, including business intelligence, real-time data analytics and virtualization.

Based on Intel's latest 32nm Sandy Bridge process technology, the new Xeon processors have up to 10 cores with Hyper-Threading, and deliver up to 40 percent greater performance than the previous Xeon 7500 series processor.

The new processor family contains 18 new processors for two-, four- and eight-socket servers, and is expandable to servers with 256 sockets. Intel boasts that a single Xeon processor E7-based server can replace a current 18 dual-core server.

For big tasks, Intel is offering 10 advanced 10-core versions of the chip, led by the E7-8870, E7-4870 and E7-2870, all of which reach 2.4 GHz with a TDP of 130 watts.

The company also announced a low voltage version as well as a frequency-optimized version. The 10-core low-voltage E7-8867L reaches 2.13 GHz with a TDP of 105 watts, while the eight-core frequency-optimized E7-8837 tops out at 2.67 GHz with a TDP of 130 watts.

Intel also added more affordable chip options in the Xeon E3-1200 family. The Xeon processor E7-8800/4800/2800 families range in price from $774 to $4,616 in quantities of 1,000. The Xeon processor E3-1200 family ranges in price from $189 to $612 in quantities of 1,000.

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  • -8 Hide
    joytech22 , April 7, 2011 7:58 AM
    I can't think of any reason why you would need so many cores, anything that needs that many cores for visual, animation and physics is better off using a GPU for anyway.

    Please, tell me what use of so many cores really is.

    On a side complaint, $4600 for a CPU when ordered in batches of 1000+?
    Intel would be making a BUCKET load off each CPU.

    Business as usual.
  • 3 Hide
    Nexus52085 , April 7, 2011 8:07 AM
    joytech22I can't think of any reason why you would need so many cores, anything that needs that many cores for visual, animation and physics is better off using a GPU for anyway.Please, tell me what use of so many cores really is.On a side complaint, $4600 for a CPU when ordered in batches of 1000+?Intel would be making a BUCKET load off each CPU.Business as usual.


    Film composers use virtual instruments that really take advantage of multi-core processing, and sometimes 8 cores is still not enough. There are a lot of composers who buy 1-3 extra computers and use them as slaves in order to process all of the audio.
  • -3 Hide
    LuckyDucky7 , April 7, 2011 8:12 AM
    Gotta beat out the 12-core AMD processors, I guess...
  • -3 Hide
    nebun , April 7, 2011 8:42 AM
    Nexus52085Film composers use virtual instruments that really take advantage of multi-core processing, and sometimes 8 cores is still not enough. There are a lot of composers who buy 1-3 extra computers and use them as slaves in order to process all of the audio.

    that's why we have GPU computing
  • 3 Hide
    cjl , April 7, 2011 8:56 AM
    GPU computing isn't the answer to everything. First, GPU computing doesn't help integer (it mainly helps floating point), so these will absolutely wipe the floor with GPUs for integer operations. Second, these are made for a completely different market - high end servers where reliability is critical. These aren't workstation or desktop CPUs - they're for large servers.
  • 0 Hide
    philologos , April 7, 2011 9:04 AM
    I'm pretty sure these are Westmere-EX processors and have nothing to do with Sandy Bridge.
  • 3 Hide
    DoDidDont , April 7, 2011 10:02 AM
    I use 3ds max and although there are render plug-ins that make use of Cuda technology, the use of the technology is still in its infancy. It has so many incompatibility problems with current material, lighting, and fx plug-ins. My current system has 24 CPU logical cores @ 3.06ghz, and 1024 Cuda cores using 2x GTX 580 phantom 3gb cards. Production rendering using Cuda cores and Iray is damn fast, and has greatly improved final render times when working on photo realistic architectural scenes, but the quality of the render takes time to match the render quality produced using mental ray using CPU cores, and you have to start a project completely from scratch using materials and lighting etc that you know will be compatible with the iray plug-in. Because of this, it makes it impossible to use Cuda technology for most of my work, as clients send me files using materials, lighting and plug-ins that do not work using iray, so for the time being, as many CPU cores as possible is a must for my work, and 3ds max makes use of all 24 CPU cores in production rendering. Production rendering with 24 CPU cores is still blisteringly fast. Nvidia claim that using their Cuda technology can be a lot faster than using Multi-core CPU’s, but that depends entirely on the system its being compared against, and the application being used. And another problem is power consumption. The two CPU’s I have installed, have a max TDP of 95w per CPU, the two GTX 580 cards have a max TDP of 488W, so there is still a lot of work to be done as far as getting GPU’s to be as power efficient as CPU’s. The Companies that are most likely to buy these new Xeon’s are large businesses that run massive data centres, server farms, and production studios, where low power consumption and reliability are critical, and GPU’s score very badly in this area. My system is prepared for the future, and I am very sure that one day when the use of Cuda technology has matured, that GPU production rendering will be more popular than CPU’s in this task, but that day is not yet, at least not in my line of industry. Iray also uses the combination of GPU and CPU technology together, so there is nothing wrong with having as many CPU cores and GPU cores in one system as possible.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , April 7, 2011 12:08 PM
    Check your facts, Tom's! These E7 processors are built on "previous generation" architecture. Here's the link from Intel to prove it:
    http://newsroom.intel.com/community/intel_newsroom/blog/2011/04/05/performance-reliability-security-intel-xeon-processor-formula-for-mission-critical-computing?cid=rss-258152-c1-265964
  • 2 Hide
    balister , April 7, 2011 12:19 PM
    joytech22I can't think of any reason why you would need so many cores, anything that needs that many cores for visual, animation and physics is better off using a GPU for anyway.Please, tell me what use of so many cores really is.On a side complaint, $4600 for a CPU when ordered in batches of 1000+?Intel would be making a BUCKET load off each CPU.Business as usual.


    Two Words for what a processor like this is used for: Virtual Servers.

    With that many cores and enough memory, the one processor could effectively act a 10 different servers where you only need one core for the virtual server.

    Pretty much this is a heavy RoI/low TCO processor.
  • 1 Hide
    lasaldude , April 7, 2011 12:52 PM
    joytech22I can't think of any reason why you would need so many cores, anything that needs that many cores for visual, animation and physics is better off using a GPU for anyway.Please, tell me what use of so many cores really is.On a side complaint, $4600 for a CPU when ordered in batches of 1000+?Intel would be making a BUCKET load off each CPU.Business as usual.


    Ummm??? A Server? Duh!
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , April 7, 2011 1:12 PM
    dodidont is totally right i work on vfx side 2, and cuda is just...to new...
  • 0 Hide
    bourgeoisdude , April 7, 2011 1:26 PM
    joytech22I can't think of any reason why you would need so many cores, anything that needs that many cores for visual, animation and physics is better off using a GPU for anyway.Please, tell me what use of so many cores really is.On a side complaint, $4600 for a CPU when ordered in batches of 1000+?Intel would be making a BUCKET load off each CPU.Business as usual.


    As balister said, you don't have to use all 10 cores for the same OS install, you spread them out for use as multiple Virtual Machines (VMs). Xeons are designed for servers (and sometimes high-end workstations) after all.
  • 1 Hide
    Reynod , April 7, 2011 1:33 PM
    http://www.intel.com/itcenter/products/xeon/E7/index.htm

    http://www.intel.com/Assets/pdf/general/ssguide.pdf

    32nm Nehalem based - up to 10 cores (20 threads per die) and instead of 12 Mb of cache these babies have up to 30 Mb of cache.

    Would they classify as Sandy Bridge ?

    Thats a MU Engineer question ... I am too tired to check.

    Markus ... you check for us matey ??

    Intel's favourite font puts me to sleep ... the pictures they use remond my of a woman's magazine ... so G-Rated ...

  • 0 Hide
    stingstang , April 7, 2011 1:36 PM
    hotmetals37Check your facts, Tom's! These E7 processors are built on "previous generation" architecture. Here's the link from Intel to prove it:http://newsroom.intel.com/communit [...] -c1-265964

    It says that these build on the previous generation, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's not the current generation. I'll give a reason of a doubt, though.
  • 0 Hide
    archibael , April 7, 2011 3:13 PM
    Quote:
    It says that these build on the previous generation, but that doesn't necessarily mean it's not the current generation. I'll give a reason of a doubt, though.


    He's right, Tom's got it wrong. Look at the "Quick Links" section on the right of

    http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=53568&processor=E7-2803&spec-codes=SLC3M

    "Products formerly Westmere-EX"

    Tom's is probably confused by the fact that some of the E3 Xeon chip family (notably the 2- and 4-cores) are Sandy Bridge derivatives:

    http://ark.intel.com/Product.aspx?id=52278&processor=E3-1280&spec-codes=SR00R



  • 1 Hide
    zachary k , April 7, 2011 3:28 PM
    CCP (makers of eve online) just dropped 50 grand to be the first company to use this chip. fighting the war on lag with the latest servers!
  • -3 Hide
    flowingbass , April 7, 2011 3:40 PM
    1000 10core CPUs for the price of ONLY $4,616??? Cmon people do the math!!! THATS FREAKING CHEAP!

    That BEATS THE CRAP OUT OF core-i7 990x 6core cpu for 1000$ you'd only get 4 cpus with 6 cores/12 threads each. But for the server side, you get 1000 cpus with 10 cores/20 threads each!!!!

    It comes out each E7-8870 cpu is worth 4.6$ what a STEAL!!!!
  • -1 Hide
    flowingbass , April 7, 2011 3:49 PM
    flowingbass1000 10core CPUs for the price of ONLY $4,616??? Cmon people do the math!!! THATS FREAKING CHEAP!That BEATS THE CRAP OUT OF core-i7 990x 6core cpu for 1000$ you'd only get 4 cpus with 6 cores/12 threads each. But for the server side, you get 1000 cpus with 10 cores/20 threads each!!!!It comes out each E7-8870 cpu is worth 4.6$ what a STEAL!!!!

    Hahaha, im just yanking your chain...
  • -1 Hide
    lamorpa , April 7, 2011 4:23 PM
    joytech22I can't think of any reason why you would need so many cores, anything that needs that many cores for visual, animation and physics is better off using a GPU for anyway.Please, tell me what use of so many cores really is.

    When you read the article using your eyes to see, and your brain to interpret the letters, you see, at the end of the very first sentence, that it is aimed at business applications, specifically, "high-end computing applications, including business intelligence, real-time data analytics and virtualization." Do you need instructions on how to read the paragraphs that follow, reiterating and detailing this?
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , April 7, 2011 5:08 PM
    HYPER-V BABY
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