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EVGA's K|NGP|N Graphics Card Available This Week: Here Are The Details

Early last week, the first images of EVGA's upcoming K|NGP|N GTX 980 Ti were revealed to the world on the Kingpin Cooling forums by K|NGP|N himself. EVGA has now revealed the details, including pricing and availability.

Vince Lucido, or K|NGP|N as he calls himself, is one of the world's most renowned overclockers. He currently holds the world record score in 3D Mark Firestrike Ultra, with a margin of over 2000 points, and has held many other 3DMark world records. EVGA partnered with him a number of years ago to create graphics cards tailored specifically with extreme overclocking in mind. 

The EVGA K|NGP|N GTX 980 Ti features a pre-binned GPU set with a base clock of 1203 MHz and boost clock set to 1304 MHz. For comparison, the reference GTX 980 Ti specifications call for a 1000 MHz base clock and 1076 MHz boost clock. 

The new K|NGP|N card features a fully digital 14+3 power phase design, which EVGA said helps the VRM deliver as much as 600A of current, while improving efficiency and keeping the temperature an average of 28 degrees C cooler. To deliver the necessary power, EVGA has included three power connectors, two 8-pin and a single 6-pin, and the PCB features 12 layers that EVGA said includes extra copper for better power delivery.

The K|NGP|N GTX 980 Ti offers advanced features such as EVBot, which allows for tuning of all aspects of the graphics card. A Probe-It connector allows direct connection with a voltmeter to monitor voltages in real time. Onboard thermal sensors (OTS) automatically tune settings in real time to help overclock as high as possible.

EVGA has also included a memory/MOSFET cooling plate that has direct contact with the memory modules and MOSFETS. It has been designed in two pieces, allowing for the GPU cooler to be replaced, while retaining the cooling plate for the MOSFETS. EVGA has also included a Quick Switch Triple BIOS on the K|NGP|N, with settings for default, overclocking and liquid nitrogen. With a waterblock installed, the card is capable of becoming a single slot solution, and EVGA has included the necessary bracket with the card.

The standard cooler on the K|NGP|N 980 Ti features five 8 mm straight copper heatpipes that are cooled by a pair of ACX 2.0 fans that only turn on once the GPU reaches 60 degrees. The back of the card has been covered with a back plate, and the front is protected by a metal shroud. The EVGA logo is also illuminated and features a customizable RGB LED light. 

Along with the K|NGP|N GTX 980 Ti, EVGA has also introduced a new program to custom tailor your purchase to your desires and budget. For the first time ever, EVGA is offering the ability to purchase higher-quality ASIC chips for a higher price. Higher quality doesn't guarantee a higher overclock, but typically the higher quality of the ASIC translates into a better chance of high overclocking potential.

EVGA is calling this the Ultimate OC Project, and it set four different price tiers for the varying K|NGP|N ASIC qualities: 72%+ for $849, 74%+ for $899 and 76%+ for $999, and the highest quality ASIC (at 80%+) has been priced at $1,049.

EVGA's K|NGP|N GTX 980 Ti will be available on July 22 at 10am PT, but supply is limited. You will also be required to log in to an EVGA account before making the purchase. You can create one here if you don't already have one.

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  • mapesdhs
    Bit odd IMO that this card comes with a lower base clock than the SC ACX 2.0. If it's supposed to be such a beast, it could at least come at a better-than-anything-else-already base clock. I know the supposed rationale, let the buyer do the oc'ing, but still...

    Ian.

    Reply
  • wtfxxxgp
    Wow. Something with this sort of raw power AND the potential for single-slot convenience? I'd say good job!
    Reply
  • tom10167
    I wish they'd offer that cooler on other cards... because it's awesome. And because who is going to really buy this card for $850 and keep it on air?
    I think the ASIC option is really freakin cool.
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    looks gorgeous, wish they plated the copper though
    Reply
  • Nuckles_56
    I really like how this card can become single slot, nice work EVGA
    Reply
  • junkeymonkey
    lets see.. evga cant keep current cards in stock , but there able to release new cards ,, hmmmm so if you cant get the card you want that's all ready been out how do we expect to get a hold of this one ? indefinite auto notify for month on end ??? LOL
    Reply
  • expunged
    looks gorgeous, wish they plated the copper though
    It would look better plated but not cool as well. I would like to see them offer this card without a cooler for those of us that want to water cool it.
    Reply
  • junkeymonkey
    I figuring it to be like whats said about the classified -not worth it .. or disappointed overall cant do much on air no water available in stock but here again hype blinds

    http://forums.evga.com/980-Ti-Kingpin-m2342319.aspx
    Reply
  • John Wittenberg
    "...but typically the higher quality of the ASIC translates into a better chance of high overclocking potential."

    That's for overclocking on Air. For water you want lower (I've seen low to mid 70% thrown out as an example), and with LN2 you want really low quality ASIC. The reason being is that with lower quality ASIC, there is more voltage leakage and the card can take more volts - better scaling when pushing the voltage and therefor better overclocking at less than ambient temps.

    DISCLAIMER: This is not first hand knowledge, but what I've read about with regards to other people's experiences.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    "...but typically the higher quality of the ASIC translates into a better chance of high overclocking potential."

    That's for overclocking on Air. For water you want lower (I've seen low to mid 70% thrown out as an example), and with LN2 you want really low quality ASIC. The reason being is that with lower quality ASIC, there is more voltage leakage and the card can take more volts - better scaling when pushing the voltage and therefor better overclocking at less than ambient temps.

    DISCLAIMER: This is not first hand knowledge, but what I've read about with regards to other people's experiences.

    However it is true. AMD released a TWKR edition Phenom II:

    http://www.legitreviews.com/amd-phenom-ii-42-twkr-black-edition-processor_1009

    It was a CPU specifically deemed for extreme overclocking as it had massive leakage but overclocked very high.
    Reply