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Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX Benchmark Shows Strong Single-Core Performance

AMD
(Image credit: AMD)

The AMD Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX (via Benchleaks) has made its first appearance on the hardware scene. The 32-core monster is part of AMD's upcoming Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5000 lineup for professional users and creators.

The Zen 3 microarchitecture has done wonders for AMD's processors, and it'll surely do the same for the Threadripper family. There haven't been any new rumors on when AMD could launch these Zen 3-powered monsters. It's not like the chipmaker is in a hurry since Intel currently doesn't have anything to compete in that specific market.

The Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX is a 32-core, 64-thread processor that finds itself just a notch down from the flagship Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5995WX. You don't need to be a genius to see that the Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX is the successor to Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX. The core count remains the same, but the transition over to the Zen 3 cores is enough to give the Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX a healthy increase in performance over its predecessor.

We don't know the state in which the Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5000 series is in, but we can only assume that the chip from the Geekbench 5 submission is an engineering sample. The 32-core chip reportedly features a 3.6 GHz base clock, and it was constantly performing a little over 4.5 GHz during the benchmark run. Comparatively, the Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX has a 3.5 GHz base clock and 4.2 GHz boost clock.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX Benchmarks

Single-Core ScoreMulti-Core Score
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX1,68627,603
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX1,29328,034
Ryzen Threadripper 3970X1,28522,366
Xeon W-3175X1,08719,994

The Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX resided on a reference platform called "Cloudripper-CGL", where the CGL probably means Chagall (the codename for the Ryzen Threadripper 5000 series). The testbed also had 128GB of DDR4 memory and was using Linux as its operating system. There are plenty of Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX submissions with Linux in Geekbench 5, but the software doesn't give us an average of the scores. Therefore, we took 10 random scores and calculate the average single-and multi-core scores. It's not fair to compare average scores to a single submission, but that's what's available for the moment.

The Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX ended up with 30.5% higher single-core performance than the Ryzen Threadripper Pro 3975WX. We had to disregard the multi-core score because it's impossible that both 32-core chips would perform similary, taking into consideration the significant difference in the single-core tests. The Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX run may be bugged.

According to Geekbench 5, the average single-and multi-core scores for the Ryzen Threadripper 3970X are 1,285 points and 22,366 points, respectively. We saw a similar single-core margin as with the Pro variant. In this case, however, the Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX delivered up to 23.4% higher multi-core performance.

The Intel Xeon W-3175X, which is already in the retirement home, has 28 cores and was the closest chip to AMD's 32-core Ryzen Threadripper processor. The W-3175X couldn't even beat the Ryzen Threadripper 3970X so it didn't come as a surprise that the Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX wiped the floor with the Intel chip.

Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5000 Specifications*

ProcessorCores / ThreadsPCIe 4.0Memory SupportTDP (W)
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5995WX64 / 128128Eight-channel280
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX32 / 64128Eight-channel280
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5965WX24 / 48128Eight-channel280
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5955WX16 / 32128Eight-channel280
Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5945WX12 / 24128Eight-channel280

*Specifications are unconfirmed.

It's likely that the Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5000 processor will retain the same number of cores, PCIe 4.0 lanes and memory support as their ancestors. However, for this generation, AMD may introduce a 24-core model in the shape of Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5965WX. It'd be a welcomed addition since the previous generation of Threadripper Pro chips lacked a 24-core SKU.

Hardware leaker ExecutableFix believes that AMD has cancelled the Threadripper 5000 series for the HEDT market. This would explain why we've haven't seen any leaked benchmarks or retailier listings for the non-Pro counterparts. The Threadripper Pro 5000 lineup will likely make its way to OEMs, and retail availability is unknown at this point.

  • JWNoctis
    "We had to disregard the multi-core score because it's impossible that both 32-core chips would perform similary, taking into consideration the significant difference in the single-core tests. The Ryzen Threadripper Pro 5975WX run may be bugged."

    Or something as simple as different power limits, or different cooling setup. Full-power benchmarks are pointless without controlling or at least specifying those parameters.
    Reply
  • Alvar "Miles" Udell
    "It's not like the chipmaker is in a hurry since Intel currently doesn't have anything to compete in that specific market. "

    Except they do need to be in a hurry. By this time next year Zen 4 will be out supporting PCIe 5 and DDR5, both much more beneficial to high end workstation setups. Also if Zen 4 is able to perform, say, 20% faster than Zen 3, and AMD increases the desktop core counts to 16 (confirmed for laptops), 24, or even 32 cores, then the only real advantage Threadripper will have is an 8 channel memory controller and electrical PCIe slots...

    If Intel is able to make the same kind of leaps in performance as AMD did with Ryzen, AMD could soon find themselves relegated to the "value HEDT" segment.
    Reply
  • hotaru251
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    then the only real advantage Threadripper will have is an 8 channel memory controller and electrical PCIe slots...
    which is fine.

    those exact reasons are what ppl want with TR.
    Reply
  • NP
    Alvar Miles Udell said:
    "It's not like the chipmaker is in a hurry since Intel currently doesn't have anything to compete in that specific market. "

    Except they do need to be in a hurry...

    No, they don't. Of course it is possible that future shows they were too complacent. But the point established here is that there is nothing in the markets that can challenge this product. And the first product in the future markets that we know can challenge this product will be a product by AMD.

    In a situation like this, it is common and reasonable to say the company is not in hurry.
    Reply